Planning + creating a new w-lan for prof. use (in a company)

November 29, 2012 at 01:14:49
Specs: Windows XP
Hello together,

I live in Germany and I'm a beginner in w-lan planning and installing, but now I got the order to improve an existing wireless network or - if it's not possible - to create a complete new one.

The w-lan is for use in a company's grounds.

The big problem I have is that I haven't got the necessary knowhow to plan and install/configure a w-lan.

The company already has a wireless network, but it's not working perfectly.
There are areas on the company grounds where the network can't be used because of w-lan dead zones.

There are three such zones where the network can't be used.

Look - these are the facts about the whole company grounds:
Complete area: 300 x 300 meters.
There are two big hangars (each 100 x 100 x 8 meters, no concrete walls).

What is the network used for:
There is a intranet webserver (windows + apache) on which a php application is running.
The company's staff has smart phones (which are already bought !) to use the intranet web application.
The installed web browser is opera mobile.

Look: The application works fine. Really.
Everything is ok - except these three zones where the wireless lan doesn't work.

Now it need help and advice what to do.

At the moment there are a w-lan router and an access point which are installed, but obviously they haven't enough power.

How could I solve the dead zone problem?

Is anybody there who can give me advice?

Thanks in advance and have a nice weekend.

Max


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#1
November 29, 2012 at 05:59:52
There are wireless boosters to improve distance but 300 meters is quite big. You might be better off having your ISP provider add a second or 3rd line to other sections of the property.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
November 29, 2012 at 07:46:20
My best recommendation for you at this point would be to hire a qualified, experienced professional with good credentials and references to do this for you.

The only other alternative is for you to take the time you need to learn enough to do the job yourself. Which while not impossible, is time consuming.

What I can tell you offhand is, you won't be able to do this with basic SOHO (small office/home office) level equipment. You're going to have to spend a bit of money to make this work.

Your buildings should be interconnected with fiber optic cabling so they can all share one physical network to which you could add Access Points both inside, and outside the building. If that isn't the case, or isn't possible or cost effective, then guapo's idea is also a good one.

Baring that, you're going to want to start researching equipment. You know how much area you need to cover. Now you need to find equipment that can be interconnected wirelessly that is strong enough to bridge the distances.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
November 29, 2012 at 08:56:33
Just remember before you get yourself in too deep that if what you recommend does not achieve the company objectives you can be sued.

This is real and no BS. Thread carefully.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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Related Solutions

#4
November 29, 2012 at 10:24:38
I'm with Curt. If you don't know what you are doing (and if you did you wouldn't be asking here) then hire someone who does. If it's a business this is not a game. Don't rely on advice from a bunch of strangers on the Internet. You can't get any redress from us if we're wrong.

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#5
November 29, 2012 at 17:03:20
I wouldn't worry about a law suit. Adding one or more lines, from the provider, is my recommendation, if management doesn't want, to install fiber optic cables, between buildings.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#6
November 30, 2012 at 09:06:30
I take it Guapo you have never worked as a contractor. :-) There is always a customer that will sue you. Especially if you cost them money and what it was spent on doesn't deliver. This isn't a "help your neighbor setup their wifi router" type job.

Being a neophyte maxheffner should not be encourgaged to try to do this on his own at all. First issue is we only have his perception and he's getting advice based on that. Remember that word neophyte? He doesn't even know what to look for. How about design? You going to have someone design your network when they have never done so? I think not.

This is bad all the way around.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
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#7
November 30, 2012 at 12:00:40
Who said that he was a contractor? I thought that he was an employee & yes, I worked as a contractor, for a small mortgage company. If I were you, I wouldn't announce that you have been sued. It might give you a bad name.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#8
November 30, 2012 at 13:48:30
LOL. I have never been sued. Not when I was a construction contractor nor when I was a IT contractor. Not sure how you were able to read that in my post of "There is always a customer that will sue you." That's a lifetime observation.

But then I might have read too much into "I got the order" as being a contract.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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#9
November 30, 2012 at 17:14:27
That's what I was thinking. "I got an order" can be an employee or a contractor talking. I really thought that the OP was an employee, In either case, I stand by my original response. Have the ISP install 1 or 2 more lines. It's simple & it will work. If it doesn't work, there is really not enough damage for a law suit. It can be reversed as fast as it was implemented.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#10
November 30, 2012 at 17:22:29
ISP installing lines isn't the issue. Its expanding the wifi coverage area which is usually just a matter of either upgrading the existing AP's to commercial versions or adding AP's into the uncovered areas.

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#11
November 30, 2012 at 17:51:46
I know what you are saying but it's my personal opinion that 300 meters is way to big to do that by adding APs. Of course, you can debate that until the end of time. Dividing the grounds into separate but connected networks would guarantee better results.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#12
December 1, 2012 at 03:18:58
Hi friends,

now it's time to answer some questions, I know .... :-)
Sorry that I haven't answered them until now.

My employer is an IT service organisation and I'm the software developer who created the php web application for our customer company.

Look, this is the situation:
My boss planned, installed and configured the existing w-lan.
I developed the intranet application for our customer's staff.

Because of the steady connection problems I visited our customer and checked the w-lan availability on the customer's grounds.
I also talked with the staff. Some of the contributors told me where the w-lan dead zones are.

I checked the w-lan availability on the whole customer's grounds.
I got one of the smart phones to help the contributors working with my intranet application.

After that - at the end of the day - I knew the contributors were right.
Now I know where the w-lan dead zones are and I told it to my boss.
He got the order (from our customer's manager) to find a solution for the problem.

So my is boss is exactly the person who has to solve the problem.

But - as we say in Germany - "I don't want to die as a fool ...".
So I want to to acquire knowledge to understand the reasons (why the w-lan doesn't work how it should work).

I know I'm not an expert and I never would buy and install equipment without asking my boss, of course :-)

The only things I want:

- Understanding why there are problems concerning the network.
- Collecting ideas to solve the problems.

Is this ok? As we say in Germany - "I don't want to die as a fool ...".

Thanks for your input.
Have a nice weekend.

Max


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#13
December 18, 2012 at 03:24:06
I would advice Extended Service Set (ESS) meaning introduction of more wireless Routers preferably the Gigabytes type with a very high mps count at places where there is need, maintaining the SSID on all Routers and configuring all other Wireless Routers to function like a wireless Switch.

ILLUSTRATION:
Run Ethernet cables from the first installed Wireless Router with resources shared over the network and plug them all to the first installed wireless Router's Ethernet ports, then run a wall fitting trunking cables in their trunking pipe to areas of need and then connect cables to respective newly installed wireless routers(Gigabytes) Ethernet ports and power then configure each of then all with the same IP convention as on the first installed wireless Router with maximum security in place(depend on organisation's request), the same SSID through out.

NOTE: There is no need to change the first installed wireless router even if its not of Gigabyte type. More so, you should try to maintain Routers from the same manufacturer to avoid inter-operational issues soon or later.


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