open ports

Dell Inspiron 1545 notebook
February 21, 2010 at 11:22:56
Specs: Windows 7
iam trying to open my secure web disk but i cant because ports 2078 (ssl) and ports 2077 are blocked ive tryed the firewall i think its my router how do i unblock these ports on my router

See More: open ports

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#1
February 21, 2010 at 12:18:16
You need to explain a bit more what you mean by your secure web disk. Is this a local disk or a remote disk.

Ports only need be opened for incoming connections. They have no effect on outgoing connections. You would be a prisoner in your own computer if you needed to open ports to make outgoing connections.

Stuart


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#2
February 21, 2010 at 14:45:01
its a secure web disc to give me easy access to web site control panel but i need those ports open for it to work ive tryed everything i can think off . allowed it through windows firewall ,written new rules in outgoing connections and still nothing can you help

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#3
February 22, 2010 at 14:11:40
Sure you have the right ports? Those are not regular ssl ports.

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#4
February 22, 2010 at 23:35:10
i no there ot regular ssl ports but i need them open . a secure web disc is a short cut to my blog so i can upload files in large numbers but ports need to be open . its from hostgator.com but they just say you need these ports open they dont tell how to open them

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#5
February 22, 2010 at 23:38:29
this is what comes up when i try to open it ..
There was a peoblem connecting to the webdisk service. please make sure ports 2078(ssl) and 2077 are not firewalled..... ive allowed the program in firewall and still it will not connect

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#6
February 23, 2010 at 01:43:16
Hello,

Ports only need to be opened for incoming connections, for example (FTP, HTTP, DNS).

Are you trying to connect to the secure web disk locally or remotely over the internet? please specify.


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#7
February 23, 2010 at 07:51:02
i am trying to connect to secure web disk remotely over internet

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#8
February 23, 2010 at 08:09:00
Go to Shields UP! and test those ports. Are they open in your router?

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#9
February 23, 2010 at 09:17:48
Make sure the Port Forwarding rules on your router are setup correctly and are mapping to your internal IP.

http://www.t1shopper.com/tools/port...

Run this tool on the ports, post results.

Regards
Lee Cook


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#10
February 23, 2010 at 09:56:47
Scanning ports on 94.196.125.1
94.196.125.1 isn't responding on port 2077 (trellisagt).94.196.125.1 isn't responding on port 2078 (trellissvr).
IS THIS RIGHT DONT NO IF THIS IS MY IP ADDRESS

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#11
February 23, 2010 at 10:04:20
Lee Cook you don't forward these ports.

Scott go to ipchicken.com. If this ip matches then this is your wan port/ip address of your router.

DO YOU HAVE A ROUTER?

You may need to add these ports to your SERVICES file. This is usually found in the ETC folder under system32 [but I don't have a win7 box to check on at this moment]



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#12
February 23, 2010 at 11:02:52
OK ILL TRY THAT!! IAM QUITE NEW TO THIS WHAT IS A ROUTER.
AND WHAT IS ETC FOLDER AND HOW DO GET TO IT SORRY IF IAM A PAIN JUST LEARNING

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#13
February 23, 2010 at 12:05:28
What is the pc plugged into to get internet?

c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc is the path in xp


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#14
February 23, 2010 at 12:31:44
ALL I KNOW IS IAM ON A DELL INSPIRON LAPTOP WITH A 3 MOBILE BROAD BAND DONGLE IF THAT HELPS YOU

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#15
February 23, 2010 at 13:38:24
Caps = LOUD = being rude on the internet btw.

Yes that helps. You have no router.
Did you go to ipchicken to confirm you ip address?

I would suggest you contact the mobil broadband supplier and ask why these ports are being blocked.


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#16
February 24, 2010 at 16:24:03
If you dont have a modem then you can not port forward as this is a job/function of a Layer 3 routing device (router).

A modem is a Point to Point connection and behaves differently.

@wanderer - What do you mean you dont forward those ports?

Regards
Lee Cook


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#17
February 24, 2010 at 19:38:37
Lee Cook you forward ports to do things like host a web server. Forward ports = incoming access. To access something on the internet you do not forward ports. All ports are open = outgoing internet access.

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#18
February 25, 2010 at 00:41:40
I think perhaps you misunderstood me, incoming access to a local web server would require port forwarding port 80 for access over the internet.

Outgoing communications use random ports and do not require port forwarding, if you was to connect to google.com your source port would be along the alines of 49500, port 80 are well known ports.

Regards
Lee Cook


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#19
February 25, 2010 at 02:11:42
Outgoing communications use random ports and do not require port forwarding

No they don't. If you think about it for a moment you will realise how silly that statement is. Outgoing communications use very well defined ports. 80 for HTTP, 21 for FTP, 110 for SMTP to name a few of the top of my head.

Outgoing communications don't require port forwarding because there is only one place outgoing communications can go and that is down the Internet connection. Ports are opened automatically by the software initiating the communication whether it be a web browser, Email client or FTP client. You only need port forwarding for unsolicited incoming communications as happens if you are running a server of any kind.

google.com uses port 80 as does every other web server hoping to get someone to contact them. Try typing google.com:49500 into your web browser and see how far you get. google.com:80 works fine as 80 is the default for HTTP. You could use another port but the server would have to be configured to accept it because it would be an unsolicited request.

Once communication has been established between server and client other ports may come into play but they would no longer be unsolicited communications. IM applications like Sky and Yahoo do it all the time.

If random ports were used how would the server at the other end know which ports to forward in order to handle the communications.

Stuart


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#20
February 25, 2010 at 06:16:14
Outgoing communications use random ports and do not require port forwarding

No they don't. If you think about it for a moment you will realise how silly that statement is. Outgoing communications use very well defined ports. 80 for HTTP, 21 for FTP, 110 for SMTP to name a few of the top of my head.

--

When your local machine sends a request to a web server at Google, in the TCP packet, the destination port number will be 80 (HTTP) where the source port number will be a random/dynamic port number.

Port numbers are used to track different conversations accross a TCP/IP network, tell me if im wrong?

Port 25 is for SMTP, whilst port 110 is used for the Post Office Protocol (POP3). SNMP operates at port 161, not 110.

Maybe your misunderstanding me, but I study Cisco Networking in college and I am confident on ports.

Regards
Lee Cook


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#21
February 25, 2010 at 06:28:26
So where does it change from a Random port to port 80?

In the router you will say.

So what happens if you are not using a router?

If the router where to be able to change the random port to port 80 it would need to have information stored in its memory for all default ports. What happens if the router gets a request where an originator has deliberately designated a port other than the default, something which is very easy to do. How does the router know it should change it or leave it.

Stuart


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#22
February 25, 2010 at 07:58:25
The port does not change, if the ports changed then how would you receive the reply?

The source port in a segment or datagram header of a client request is randomly generated from port numbers greater than 1023. As long as it does not conflict with other ports in use on the system, the client can choose any port number from the range of default port numbers used by the operating system. This port number acts like a return address for the requesting application. The Transport layer keeps track of this port and the application that initiated the request so that when a response is returned, it can be forwarded to the correct application. The requesting application port number is used as the destination port number in the response coming back from the server.

If the web browser requesting the web page is running on host 192.168.100.48 and the Dynamic port number assigned to the web browser is 49152, the socket for the web page would be 192.168.100.48:49152.

Regards
Lee Cook


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#23
February 25, 2010 at 08:22:43
"incoming access to a local web server "

That is not the OP's issue. Its accessing a web disk on the internet not locally.


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#24
February 25, 2010 at 08:32:34
I meant if someone over the internet was accessing your local web server in your LAN, that would require port forwarding.

You do not need to forward ports if accessing locally over the LAN since the default gateway is bypassed locally.

Regards
Lee Cook


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#25
February 25, 2010 at 17:13:05
Lee, you are getting confused between the functions of a port number and an IP address.

It is the IP address that is used for the return address. The port number serves pretty much the same purpose as an extension number to a telephone number. The IP address gets you to the place you want to be. The port number determines how it is handled once it gets there. It only comes into play once the data has reached its destination. It plays no part in how it gets there.

Both ends of a communication link need to be using the same port number. That is why they have default port numbers, so everyone is reading of the same page. You are not going to get that if one end is generating random numbers.

Consider this.

There a little over 64,000 port number - 16 bits

There are over 4 billion IPv4 IP addresses - 32 bits, and they are getting in short supply hence the introduction of IPv6.

If 4 billion unique numbers are not enough to uniquely identify a particular computer, how is a measly 64 thousand ports numbers going to do it.

Stuart


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#26
February 26, 2010 at 06:11:09
Hello Stuart,

We are both getting confused with each other, the "acts as a return address" paragraph was copied directly from Cisco.

We use port numbers to track several conversations over the network and to deliver the data to the correct application (once it's on the machine).

Because IP operates on Layer 3 (before port numbers come into play) it's the IP address thats used as a return address yeah, but also the port number is extremely important.

I know we are both right, we are just misunderstanding each other.

Regards
Lee Cook


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#27
April 23, 2010 at 23:13:08
Both ends of a communication link need to be using the same port number. That is why they have default port numbers, so everyone is reading of the same page. You are not going to get that if one end is generating random numbers.

I'm sorry but that statement is not right. It is true that both ends must agree on one port number if they are to communicate, these are what are referred to as the 'well known port numbers.' However, only the server end actually listens on such ports, while the clients speak to these ports on servers.

In fact what lee said is true: clients, who initiate outgoing connections to servers, actually get semi-random outgoing port numbers (technically they're not really random, but are usually assigned by the operating system in a round-robin fashion).

An analogy to this is me mailing you a letter. Obviously, for me to send you a letter we don't need to have the same address. However, I do need to know your address for the letter to get to you. Once you receive the letter, you'll also know my address (because I wrote it on the top corner of the envelope) but anyone can send you a letter from any address.

Routers with firewalls introduce a level complexity - Network Address Translation (NAT) - where one IP address is shared by many machines. The router uses the destination port number of incoming messages from the outside Internet to figure out which machine to forward those messages to on the inside. This is port forwarding. The forwarding rules are set up in the router to say something like "when an incoming connection is attempted on port 80, direct that request to the internal machine at address 192.168.1.1".

Back to something related more to the OPs question (which is probably stale now anyway .. but I found it doing a search so I'll offer an answer): The web disk protocol requires a two-way connection (two sockets are involved) because the server (the machine hosting the actual physical disk) needs to be able to write back to the client. This is why one of either port 2078 (SSL) or 2077 (non-SSL) needs to be opened up on the client (the machine making use of the storage). Since the OP seems to be using a 3G or EDGE dongle of some sort, it seems to me that the firewall on his laptop is where the port needs to be opened up.

Rich


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