Solved one upload, one download network card in win

December 5, 2011 at 16:35:54
Specs: Windows 7, pent dual core 3g
setting up an upload network card and a download card, one wireless one ethernet, both are set up and communicating through my router...

See More: one upload, one download network card in win

Report •


✔ Best Answer
December 5, 2011 at 19:46:27
Bridging two network cards is not the same as what you are trying to do a totally different thing altogether.

The IP of the router is the gateway address. Every device connected to the router will have that address. It is not the IP address assigned to card or wireless adapter which is the one that matters.

Yes the router will send the data to the assigned IP for incoming traffic, the same IP that initiated the transfer by sending in a request in the first place. The router cannot send incoming traffic to an IP different than the one that initiated the transfer in the first place.

It is the routers software that assigns the IP address to send incoming data to based on the IP address of the device that requested the data.in the first place.

Even so, splitting send and receive in as you ware suggesting for Internet traffic, if it were possible, would be a pointless exercise as the bandwidth of the slowest LAN connection is a lot greater than any Internet connection. Nothing would be achieved.

Stuart



#1
December 5, 2011 at 16:58:11
You have no control of which card does what. Windows will use the fastest connection and ignore the other.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#2
December 5, 2011 at 17:29:04
so you are saying that I cant shut off send on one , and shut off receive on the other, wouldnt that force the data through the network respectively?

Report •

#3
December 5, 2011 at 18:00:47
I read some of your older posts and it makes sence that windows would optimize the connection, I just thought that with full duplex through one port (two way traffic) if seperated would free up some throughport traffic and make it more efficiant..

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 5, 2011 at 19:08:05
You are completely misunderstanding the problem iceman. Networks dont work like that, either a Local Area Netwrok or the Internet. When you are uploading and downloading there is two way traffic constantly. What you are asking is half-duplex or simplex with the send and receive on two different IP addresses. You router would have to know that the two IP addresses are linked.

You cannot have send and receive on two different network card as they would each have a different IP address and and sending on one IP address and listening on another is not something that any network protocol I know can do..

If you could shut of receive while you were sending nothing would work as the sending software would never receive any acknowledgements that the receiver was actually receiving it and would assume the receiver had gone off line and not bother.

Stuart


Report •

#5
December 5, 2011 at 19:24:41
technially there isn't a problem, the two network cards as they are installed right now both work, at the same time.....
I have bridged them beforeand they also functioned, it almost sounds like you think I am stupid... there is not a problem actually you ansered the question by stating that the send and receive have to be on the same card, technically they are.... the ip of the router ..... right?
my two cards go into a router that is able to direct the trafic to wherever I want it to go.... Once the data leaves the router it is tagged with the router IP.... Correct? Once it returnes to the destination the router will translate the data and direct it to the assigned ip for incomming traffic..... YES/ No?

Report •

#6
December 5, 2011 at 19:46:27
✔ Best Answer
Bridging two network cards is not the same as what you are trying to do a totally different thing altogether.

The IP of the router is the gateway address. Every device connected to the router will have that address. It is not the IP address assigned to card or wireless adapter which is the one that matters.

Yes the router will send the data to the assigned IP for incoming traffic, the same IP that initiated the transfer by sending in a request in the first place. The router cannot send incoming traffic to an IP different than the one that initiated the transfer in the first place.

It is the routers software that assigns the IP address to send incoming data to based on the IP address of the device that requested the data.in the first place.

Even so, splitting send and receive in as you ware suggesting for Internet traffic, if it were possible, would be a pointless exercise as the bandwidth of the slowest LAN connection is a lot greater than any Internet connection. Nothing would be achieved.

Stuart


Report •

#7
December 6, 2011 at 00:44:10
and that sir is the advice that I will take, and just lotting you know I am pretty hard headed... ohhh you know that already? good.... the face that the trafic doesnt travel both way at the same time till surprizes me..but I guess untill it actually gets to the trunk lineor back bone it is on a dedicated path out the network..
I thank all who contributed and hope the quality o knowlage is consistant... with everyone ...
Thanks ............
Chuck

Report •

#8
December 6, 2011 at 00:50:46
also I forgot to add, when I referred to the IP from the router... I ment the outside IP for the provider, one card ill be sending data one will receive it once the router is told what to do with the trafic....it will be the only incomming connection, but even so... the other pcs on the network have there own ip... or mac or that matter... you are right though it does seem pointless... but i thought differant about the actual transport o data.... I have to admit it surprises me that like u said it is one way....

Report •

Ask Question