Solved No signal from my converted keystone jacks

October 14, 2011 at 18:36:04
Specs: N/A
I converted my old telephone wiring (Cat5e wire) to Ethernet by adding keystone jacks and then tied all the rooms together. I test every room for continuity with a LAN tester and everything showed up OK. I then plug my Ethernet in one of the keystone jack and check for internet in every room with my laptop received no connection. I connect the same cable to my laptop and everything works fine. Can someone tell me what the problem may be and how I can fix it. Thanks

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✔ Best Answer
October 15, 2011 at 07:51:59
Whew......lol........yeah, that's not going to work properly. While whomever did that cabling used Cat5e they likely set it up for phone only and I can't see any way to convert this easily.

I suspect all those cables go through an outside wall in a conduit.......likely a PVC (plastic) conduit. If you look on the inside of that wall and locate said conduit, and it is plastic, then it would be easy enough to access the cable inside.

However, before doing anything else, you would need to trace that conduit, and the cables inside it, back through the house. If all cables pass through the outer wall together in a single conduit, then they must break out and go their separate ways to separate rooms somewhere. That's what you need/want to find, is where they break out of the single conduit. Likely this will be some sort of a box with a removable faceplate that has multiple conduits that feed into it (and from it, the individual rooms).

If that's how it was done, once you find the breakout, you would pull all the cables back to the breakout from outside giving you some length to work with. Then you would punch them down to a patch panel in that location.

Things to remember:
- If those are your phone lines, you will need to pull a new phone line from the outside location into the inside of your house or you won't have a phone. Buy a long enough piece of Cat5e cable to reach and attach it to the cables outside before pulling them into the house. Then you could connect it to the phone panel on the outside, and feed the rest of your house from that.
- If you use ADSL for internet, the logical place to put the phone concentrator in your house would be in the room with your patch panel. This way you could put the modem and a router in there as well and a switch if necessary to feed all 6 network connections.
- Conduit can be opened with a hacksaw...be it plastic or galvanized.

To be able to tell you whether or not any of this is possible would require an onsite visit and about 30 minutes of my time. If your house is like mine, and the basement ceiling is finished with sheetrock (as versus a tile 'drop ceiling') then you're basically screwed and can't do anything about the cabling without having to a bunch of renovating on your ceiling.

Personally, I would recommend you get a professional in to look your situation over. Unless you know what you're doing it would be all to easy to mess things up. From the sounds of it, you connected all 6 cables together outside as follows:
6 blue wires bundled together
6 blue/white wires bundled together
6 green wires bundled together
6 green/white............ etc etc
and were hoping this would work as network connections. It can't, it won't......period, end of story.

Each individual network connection has to be separate to work otherwise they won't communicate properly. Yes, it tested good for you........for two reasons:
1) you used a cheap "blinking light" tester which is the next best thing to useless for testing network connections
2) without anything plugged in and active on any other ports, it would appear to the cheap (useless) tester to be a separate and discrete circuit...which it isn't.

Again, get a professional in to have a look at your house and give you a quote on wiring it up for you. It may be possible to use your existing cables but only a professional would be able to tell you.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
October 14, 2011 at 20:29:54
What do you mean by, I connect the same cable to my laptop? What cable & from where?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
October 14, 2011 at 20:43:15
I took the same patch cable that I generally use to connect to my router in the basement with the laptop and connect it directly to the keystone jack in the basement then tried connecting my laptop in all the rooms upstairs but got no ethernet signal to be able to access the Internet.

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#3
October 15, 2011 at 02:48:14
Ramacon - you can't connect the wiring together. Each lead has to go to a separate port in a switch or hub.

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#4
October 15, 2011 at 05:39:04
Is there a patch panel?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#5
October 15, 2011 at 07:10:59
Unfortunately, I dont have a patch panel. My house was already wired with CAT5e cable and the wire for each room (6) is individually routed to the outside of the house bundle together with about 8" in length next to my electric meter box and cable connections. I have no access to the the bundled wires on the inside of the house to put a patch panel or punch down block. The house is fairly new and all wiring is completely sealed off so my options are very limited. I made all the connections outside by crimping all the wires together by color code hoping that should do the trick like my old telephone wiring.

I'm sorry if I sound like a complete idiot but is there a way for me to put a patch panel or punch down block on the outside also, do you think that having the wires that close (1ft) away from the electric meter box will also cause an issue. I appreciate your patience and assistance with my issue.


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#6
October 15, 2011 at 07:51:59
✔ Best Answer
Whew......lol........yeah, that's not going to work properly. While whomever did that cabling used Cat5e they likely set it up for phone only and I can't see any way to convert this easily.

I suspect all those cables go through an outside wall in a conduit.......likely a PVC (plastic) conduit. If you look on the inside of that wall and locate said conduit, and it is plastic, then it would be easy enough to access the cable inside.

However, before doing anything else, you would need to trace that conduit, and the cables inside it, back through the house. If all cables pass through the outer wall together in a single conduit, then they must break out and go their separate ways to separate rooms somewhere. That's what you need/want to find, is where they break out of the single conduit. Likely this will be some sort of a box with a removable faceplate that has multiple conduits that feed into it (and from it, the individual rooms).

If that's how it was done, once you find the breakout, you would pull all the cables back to the breakout from outside giving you some length to work with. Then you would punch them down to a patch panel in that location.

Things to remember:
- If those are your phone lines, you will need to pull a new phone line from the outside location into the inside of your house or you won't have a phone. Buy a long enough piece of Cat5e cable to reach and attach it to the cables outside before pulling them into the house. Then you could connect it to the phone panel on the outside, and feed the rest of your house from that.
- If you use ADSL for internet, the logical place to put the phone concentrator in your house would be in the room with your patch panel. This way you could put the modem and a router in there as well and a switch if necessary to feed all 6 network connections.
- Conduit can be opened with a hacksaw...be it plastic or galvanized.

To be able to tell you whether or not any of this is possible would require an onsite visit and about 30 minutes of my time. If your house is like mine, and the basement ceiling is finished with sheetrock (as versus a tile 'drop ceiling') then you're basically screwed and can't do anything about the cabling without having to a bunch of renovating on your ceiling.

Personally, I would recommend you get a professional in to look your situation over. Unless you know what you're doing it would be all to easy to mess things up. From the sounds of it, you connected all 6 cables together outside as follows:
6 blue wires bundled together
6 blue/white wires bundled together
6 green wires bundled together
6 green/white............ etc etc
and were hoping this would work as network connections. It can't, it won't......period, end of story.

Each individual network connection has to be separate to work otherwise they won't communicate properly. Yes, it tested good for you........for two reasons:
1) you used a cheap "blinking light" tester which is the next best thing to useless for testing network connections
2) without anything plugged in and active on any other ports, it would appear to the cheap (useless) tester to be a separate and discrete circuit...which it isn't.

Again, get a professional in to have a look at your house and give you a quote on wiring it up for you. It may be possible to use your existing cables but only a professional would be able to tell you.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
October 15, 2011 at 10:57:00
Curt, from what I can see through the wall jacks, the wires are not going through any conduits. It seems like they were just ran and stapled on the side of the floor joist. I have no way to confirm this because the entire ceiling in the basement is completed sealed off with sheet rock. My only option to locate where all the wires meet is to cut like a 2'x2 square in the basement ceiling close to where the wires exit the building which I'm not sure I really want to do that's why I was hoping there would be a option to make the connection in a weatherproof box and on a punch down block. But based off your assessment, it seems like my only option is to go this route.

A little more history and my ultimate goal with this project. When I purchased the home (Newly built) I order the Comcast package which had TV,Internet and VOIP telephone. The cable guy just hooked tie all the wires outside together so as to be able to use phone connected to my modem so currently I don't have a main phone wire from the street going into my house. I have my modem in the basement connected to a linsys wireless router which is feeding 2 computers and a laptop in the basement and 2 other laptop and other devices wirelessly upstairs.

I got rid of my home phone and I'm trying to be able to make wired connections for my Apple tv, Logitech Revue or Roku box whichever I finally decide to use so I can get rid of my cable. I know all these devices have the option to connect wirelessly however, I'm concern about security and the bandwidth I will receive. So that's my reason for doing this project.


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#8
October 15, 2011 at 14:45:24
Cut the sheet rock, near the wall, at the location of outside box. You can bring everything inside & install the patch panel or punch block there.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#9
October 15, 2011 at 16:04:20
Do it proper. Don't forget you will need space for router and modem plus power and dsl or cable connection.

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#10
October 15, 2011 at 16:51:17
Based off all your responses, I'm finally convinced that I will have to do a little construction work..lol.. The good news is that I was able to locate the all the wires in the basement ceiling by removing the AC/Heat air vent, then push duct a little to the side. Luckily it's a flexible duct. I'm not able to fit my head throthat hoe hole and the distance is to far to grab the wires but with a mirror, my, a hook, my camcorder and 50ft Greenlee fish tape I bought on clearance from Home Depot for $5, I should be able to set it up the right way recessed in the wall. Thank you guys for all the information. I'm now even more motivated to get this done. My only concern is that the wires were ran closely beside the power wires in each room towards the electrical panel box.

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#11
October 15, 2011 at 18:51:31
Don't be afraid to remove the staples that hold the wires to the studs or joists.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#12
October 19, 2011 at 14:56:23
Ok guys, after countless hours fishing the wires in the wall, I'm almost completed. I purchased a small Leviton distribution panel from HD, a Leviton 6 port cat 5e punch down/patch panel and the power surge suppressor. I was able add a dedicated circuit (got a little ambitious) into my panel box which is about 24" away. Everything is installed and ready to except that I'm waiting on a new power adapter for one of my old wired Linsys router.

The only problem I'm having is that it seem like the 7-8 circuit on the circuit on the punch down block for 2 rooms are broken. I checked the wire leads to the panel with the LAN tester and the wires are fine but when I connected them back to the block and plug in the patch cable, I received no signal from the port. It sucks that I will have to send the block back and install another one but for the most part, everything else is fine. Here is a link to the photo of what I did so far.
http://db.tt/61abhKL9


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#13
October 19, 2011 at 19:29:55
Can you switch those two rooms to another cicuit on the panel, for testing purposes?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#14
October 19, 2011 at 19:48:21
I figured the way I did the test by using a cut patch cord and connect all the wires to the ones for those 2 rooms, then run the test with the LAN tester, should have given me the correct result. I will try doing it that way tomorrow and see what happens.

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#15
October 20, 2011 at 07:17:48
I lost track of this thread........sorry about that! Now that I've found it again.....

The only problem I'm having is that it seem like the 7-8 circuit on the circuit on the punch down block for 2 rooms are broken

I'm guessing you mean the 7-8 wires on the cables for two rooms. If that's correct, then it's possible the cable is damaged somewhere between the punchdown and the keystone. Whenever I run into a situation like this, I repunch both ends. If it's still not good, try replacing the Keystone with another one. I've run into bad keystones.

If you do all the above and it still won't work then it's a bad cable. In a case like that, I would punch it down so you can still get 100 Mbps out of the run. 100 Mbps only requires 4 wires (two pairs). If memory serves me, they are numbers: 1,2,3,6.

If your tester is the blinking light variety, it's a waste of time and money and as you've discovered, pretty much useless. Now I know it's not worth it for you to drop $1500.00 on a tester you'll only use a couple times but there are alternatives. You could check with local electrical contractors and/or network cabling specialists and see what they'd charge to test/certify your cables for you. If the cables are already pulled and punched, it shouldn't be much at all.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#16
October 20, 2011 at 18:52:25
Curt, I'm a novice when it comes down to the whole Network lingo but I
was talking about the connection of the 7-8 wire (W/Brown & Brown )
respectively on the punch down block if it that make any sense. To
further elaborate, whenever I use the Sperry T568 B tester ($39.97)
which does a great job with checking for continuity and testing my key
stone jacks so far. It gives a green indicator when the wires are
fine, a red indicator when the wires are crossed and no indicator if
their is not any continuity. I tested all 6 jacks before I punched
down wires on the block and the reading was perfect for all the rooms.

I also took Gaupo's advice and switch those rooms around and they
worked perfectly and the other rooms still had problems on the 7-8
circuit so I decided to stop by the HD who to my surprise had the same
exact 6 port block which I then purchased and re-punch down all the
rooms again. I then tested all the rooms  again with the same tester
and wallah!  Everything is now perfect. I checked all the room for
internet connectivity and I'm getting an average of 30 MBPS on all
ports which will do for now. I'm using a Motorola SB6121 SURF board DOCSIS 3.0 Cable
Modem on the Comcast network. 

The only thing left for me to do now is to connect my router and
hopefully by tomorrow when my power supply comes in, I will be all set.

You guys have been amazing and I really do appreciate all your help
and guidance throughout this process. It was a great experience for me
as it was my first time doing anything like this and I feel like an expert. Maybe I can now do this for a living...lol..j/k


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#17
October 21, 2011 at 07:39:02
I figured you were talking about 7/8 (brown, white/brown). All one has to do is google "network cable pinout" to find a diagram of how it's done as per the following link:

http://www.duxcw.com/digest/Howto/n...

It's worth noting that wires 7/8 aren't used for 100 Mbps communication. So, if you have the other 6 wires punched down in the correct order, those two runs should still provide 100 Mbps.

Everything is now perfect. I checked all the room for
internet connectivity and I'm getting an average of 30 MBPS on all
ports which will do for now

If you're only getting 30 Mbps on your LAN, everything is not perfect. You should be getting 100 Mbps at the very least. If all your NIC's and your switch are 1000 Mbps, you should be getting that. Something is wrong if all you can get is 30 Mbps with 100 Mbps NIC's. Again, this is where a real tester comes in handy.

Unless of course you're referring to the external bandwidth and not your internal LAN bandwidth. In which case 30 Mbps is pretty darn good.

You guys have been amazing and I really do appreciate all your help
and guidance throughout this process. It was a great experience for me
as it was my first time doing anything like this and I feel like an expert. Maybe I can now do this for a living...lol..j/k

It's always a pleasure to help...........and you're a lot closer to being correct than incorrect as to what it takes to pull/punch/test cable. It's not a very complex thing to do. I've pulled a few thousand km's of cable by now and punched and tested/certified it and it's one of those repetetive jobs that's not very hard to do. Fortunately, it's a very small portion of my actual job so I'm not stuck doing it too often anymore.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#18
October 30, 2011 at 07:36:14
Curt, I guess I was talking about the external bandwidth and not the internal which I'm getting 100mbps on the desktops and 1gbps on one of my laptop. I used speedtest.net to check the download and up load speed. I'm however having some other issues connecting to the Internet due to possible IP conflicts or my router and switch position and configuration. I'm not sure if I should start another thread since I already selected "Best answer" as issue being resolved or can I just continue here?

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