NIC / TCP Settings Help

January 13, 2009 at 09:45:46
Specs: Windows Server 2008, Q9300 / 4gb
I'm currently renting a dedicated server box out of Chicago which I'm using to host CounterStrike Source game servers off, and clearly, I want the best performance out of them I can get. I'd like some insight as to what I should set my NIC & TCP settings at to achieve optimum performance for what I'm doing. If you could please help me out with setting the following, it would be much appreciated.

**NIC CARD SETTINGS* (Intel PRO/1000 PM)
-Flow Control (Disabled, Rx Enabled, Tx Enabled or Rx & Tx Enabled)
-Interrupt Moderation (Enabled/Disabled)
-Interrupt Mod Rate (Low, High, Med, Adaptive, Off)
-Transmit Buffers
-Receive Buffers

**TCP SETTINGS**
Receive-Side Scaling State
Chimney Offload State
Receive Window Auto-Tuning Level
Add-On Congestion Control Provider
ECN Capability
RFC 1323 Timestamps

Thanks a bunch!


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#1
January 13, 2009 at 10:31:51
Leave your gigabit nic alone. All the settings are naturally optimized.

Your internet connection at most is megabit and will remain the slow part of the connection.


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#2
January 13, 2009 at 11:00:31
Well I've been reading a lot of articles regarding Autotuninglevel, Interrupt Moderation and ECN, some making me think they should be disabled, can you give me some kind of insight on these 3 settings (ECN, autotuninglevel, interrupt moderation)?

thanks


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#3
January 13, 2009 at 11:17:37
not hard to google these terms

Here is ECN

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explic...

you would not want to disable this as your tcp supports it.

Again any changes you make will not change the fact your internet access is the slowest link. In fact, your changes may cause poor performance.

You need to account for the gig switch settings the nic is connected to.

And whatever you do don't believe everything you read on the internet. Too many folks look at an article that addresses a particular scenerio and think they should apply it when they don't have that scenerio.


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#4
January 13, 2009 at 13:13:36
I highly recommend against making any changes to settings on the server NIC.

First off, you don't have a clue what you're doing (sorry, I don't mean to be rude but this is a fact or you wouldn't be here asking what you're asking).

Second, if you got the above advice from other gamers then it's worth exactly what you paid for it....which is to say nothing.

There are no enhancements that can be made that would improve anything on your server...........period. Anybody who tells you anything different is the south end of a north bound horse.

The only "insight" you need to know is that your system is running as good as it can/will all things considered.

I am a computing professional. I am a networking professional. I have been working in industry for over 15 years. I am also an avid gamer. I, and some friends own our own gaming server which we have hosted at a colocation site in Chicago. As a computing professional, my group has elected me to be one of the server admins (not game admin, but the actual box.....we have a Remote Access KVM connected to it so I can connect from anywhere in the world as if I were standing at the console) as well as one other computer savvy member of our group.

Total number of tweaks/enhancements/changes made to our NIC = NONE



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#5
January 13, 2009 at 13:35:18
I can also access my box from anywhere in the world, Remote Desktop Connection isn't very hard to use. Although my networking skills aren't very proficient, I still understand it with a basic knowledge. I'm in 2nd year of a Computer Programmer / Analyst course.. The reason I was asking these questions, is because the effect of tweaking these settings will be different depending on what the box is used for. Now as for the problem, I have already tinkered with a few things, such as trying different settings for Auto-tuning level, as well as enabling CTPC. This is what I currently have for TCP settings, could you please advise me as to what I should set them back to..

TCP Global Parameters
-----------------
Receive-Side Scaling State : enabled
Chimney Offload State : enabled
Receive Window Auto-Tuning Level : normal
Add-On Congestion Control Provider : ctcp
ECN Capability : enabled
RFC 1323 Timestamps : disabled


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#6
January 13, 2009 at 15:09:45
I can also access my box from anywhere in the world, Remote Desktop Connection isn't very hard to use.

Nope, easy as pie to use. However, RDC, does not allow you to reboot the server and then enter the BIOS, which a remote KVM does allow. Please note, I wasn't suggesting you purchase one. I was just saying that's what we use.

Although my networking skills aren't very proficient, I still understand it with a basic knowledge. I'm in 2nd year of a Computer Programmer / Analyst course..

Apples and alligators. Programming has nothing to do with networking and every programming course I've ever seen offers little to nothing in the way of actual network training. While you might get one course on the basics. You won't go in-depth on sub/supernetting, VLAN tagging, routing etc etc (Oh, and I work for a university and the Comp Sci program here is all about programming and there's no network training as part of the program).

The reason I was asking these questions, is because the effect of tweaking these settings will be different depending on what the box is used for.

Incorrect.

If your network is properly configured, there is nothing you can do to the NIC on a server to improve anything.......period, end of story, fini!

If you wish to change all the settings on your NIC back to the default simply remove it from Device Manager and reboot. Let windows "find" the NIC and apply drivers to it and voila, you're back to the defaults.

Oh darn, that's right, you connect via RDC and can't do that (ie: you remove the NIC, you can't connect) whereas with my remote KVM, I can do that (and actually have at one point in time when the NIC driver's became corrupted and it stopped working properly).

You could call your hosting site, explain that you wish to un/reinstall the NIC and find out what they would charge you to do it for you (NIC has to be reassigned TCP/IP info after reinstalling or you won't be able to connect via RDC. Other than that, well, next time you tinker, I highly recommend writing down the present settings before changing any of them so you can change them back.

One last thing....where computers and computing are concerned I try to live by a couple of simple rules:

1) (aka the Golden Rule) If it ain't broke, don't fix it!

It's worth noting that tweaking settings of any kind when you don't understand fully what the settings are for, and what they do, is the same thing as fixing something that isn't broken. Which is to say, it's begging to have something really screw up or break on you.

2) KISS (keep it simple silly!)



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