Solved New WLAN card installed in desktop PC -no networks displayed

Microsoft Windows 7 ultimate 64-bit
February 1, 2015 at 12:32:38
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate, Core i7
Hello--

I just installed an Intel 6205 wireless N card in a Dell Optiplex 780 USFF desktop.Found and installed drivers, and it shows up in Device Manager as working, the adapter shows up in Network and Sharing as enabled, and WLAN Auto-Config service is showing as started. However, the system tray icon only shows the wired connection, and when I try "Connect" from the adapter icon in Networks and Sharing, it pops up the info about the wired network. Is there Extra software in Windows I need, or something else that I'm missing?

Thanks.

message edited by harryrutland


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✔ Best Answer
February 5, 2015 at 18:17:53
Believe I may have found the answer, inadvertently.

Brought the box inside the house and hooked it up--RIGHT next to my router (not on purpose, that just happens to be where the KVM is). Lo and behold, there's a signal. Not a strong signal mind you, but enough that I'm able to connect and do some test surfing.

I could swear when I was researching this wireless card that it said it didn't need an antenna, but the evidence doesn't really bear that out! I think my next move is to buy an antenna kit and hook it up, see if that doesn't solve my problem.

Thanks, everyone, for your time and diagnostic skills. If an antenna doesn't fix it, I'll come back and let you know.

--Eric



#1
February 1, 2015 at 13:09:04
A bit basic perhaps but... have you enabled wifi on your router? By default it's usually off...

What make/model is your router?


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#2
February 1, 2015 at 13:23:21
It's a NIghthawk R7000, and it's definitely on already (I've got at least a half dozen other devices that are connected to it wirelessly :-) ).

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#3
February 1, 2015 at 13:23:22
Press Windows key + r

Type ncpa.cpl in the Run box Window and hit Enter key - OK any prompts.

You should now see both your Ethernet (cable) item and your Wifi item. Make sure that the Wifi is enabled (right click option). You can disable the wired network if you are not using it.

Otherwise it might be worth looking for updated 64 bit drivers for the wireless card.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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Related Solutions

#4
February 1, 2015 at 13:52:59
Hi Derek--

No dice. I'm able to get to that section of the Control Panel just by going through Control Panel. The adapter shows as enabled and not connected. The drivers I downloaded from Intel are actually dated 2015; don't think there's anything newer. When I right-click on the wireless adapter and click "Connect," it pops up the info about the wired connection, as if I had clicked the wired icon from the system tray.


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#5
February 1, 2015 at 14:26:27
Give this a shot - open Device Manager, click on the arrow next to Network adapters, right click & uninstall all that are listed, then reboot.

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#6
February 1, 2015 at 16:20:47
It found both the wired and wireless and reinstalled them, but it's still exactly the same as it was before...!!!

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#7
February 1, 2015 at 16:22:14
Also a little bit basic, but how about unplugging your wired connection. Windows may be defaulting to the 'Best' connection and ignoring the wireless until it is the 'best' option.

Is there any reason why you are adding a wireless card when you apparently have a wired connection available?

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
February 1, 2015 at 16:42:16
Also another little bit basic is the Wi-Fi Protected Setup enabled on your Netgear router?

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


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#9
February 2, 2015 at 18:50:02
I'm adding the wireless card because the wired connection is a powerline adapter, and despite claiming to be connected at 100Mbps, it seems to be really slow and occasionally unreliable when I'm using the computer for streaming video. Since pretty much every wireless connection in the house beats that connection speed and is reliable, I'm gonna try that.

Frankly I have no idea if the Wi-Fi Protected Setup is on--I never use it.

I'm actually using this computer as a sort of of nannycam for my dogs--it has no monitor, keyboard or mouse on it, just a camera, and I access it through VNC. I'll bring it in and connect it to said devices so I can disconnect the ethernet and see what I get and report back.

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#10
February 2, 2015 at 19:19:31
I've actually found PowerLine adapters very good, although they can depend a lot on exactly how your domestic power supply is wired up. The claim of 100Mbps is just the maximum it can do (same with Wifi). Many factors can reduce this including server limitations - distance from telephone exchange etc. I note however that your other connections are doing better.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#11
February 3, 2015 at 00:26:45
A wired/wireless IP cam would have been a better choice in my opinion.
50 USD can get you reasonable cam with up/down left/right movement even with night vision (I.R. LEDs)

Back to the wireless NIC:
Have you installed the IntelĀ® PROSet/Wireless Software utility from the CD?
Can you configure the NIC from this app?

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#12
February 3, 2015 at 19:38:32
Derek--

It's actually supposed to be a 500Mbps powerline set, but of course the NIC in the computer has to choose between 10/100/1000, so it defaults to 100.

Sluc--

I lobbied for that, but I already had the computer and the wife didn't want to spring for an IP cam. :-)

Don't have that software. I downloaded the drivers straight from Intel. I'll go look for that.

Thanks,
Eric


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#13
February 4, 2015 at 11:51:07
Looks like I had fallen behind the times on these Mbps ratings, with internet speeds increasing - useful info.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#14
February 5, 2015 at 18:17:53
✔ Best Answer
Believe I may have found the answer, inadvertently.

Brought the box inside the house and hooked it up--RIGHT next to my router (not on purpose, that just happens to be where the KVM is). Lo and behold, there's a signal. Not a strong signal mind you, but enough that I'm able to connect and do some test surfing.

I could swear when I was researching this wireless card that it said it didn't need an antenna, but the evidence doesn't really bear that out! I think my next move is to buy an antenna kit and hook it up, see if that doesn't solve my problem.

Thanks, everyone, for your time and diagnostic skills. If an antenna doesn't fix it, I'll come back and let you know.

--Eric


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#15
February 6, 2015 at 00:58:22
The few occasions I've used plug-in cards (desktop) the cards have been supplied with a stubby antennae to be screwed onto the backplate of the plug-in card; have never seen a card supplied without that antennae.

In portables I seem to recall it's built into the lid (around the display).


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