Networking cables

April 19, 2009 at 21:08:08
Specs: Windows XP
So i networked my house today with CAT 6 cable. Threw some rj45 ends on each side. I used a standard color diagram that was the same on both sides. O, OW, B, BW, G, GW, B,BW. I have made cables before but they were not rg 6. (didnt think there was a difference, is there?) Well when i went to plug them in all i get is "LIMITED CONNECTIVITY" or on the routers i get a on and off blinking light. Plus the cable is about 80 feet and it wasnt showing any connectivity to my computer so i put another router in between (was going to eventually do this but figured it was a signal strength issue). What does anyone think it is. I have been testing and testing for hours now and got nowhere but angry and tired running up and down steps.

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#1
April 19, 2009 at 21:13:45
RG-6 cable? RG-6 is coaxial (like for TV). Hopefully you meant Cat 6 cable. Based on the color scheme you listed, I'll assume that is what you meant. As long as you wired the strands (individual wires) up in the same order on each end, it should work. What you need to do is get a cable tester (or at least a multimeter that can reach each end of the cable, and make sure each strand works and is wired up in the correct order.

-Ryan Adams
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#2
April 19, 2009 at 21:29:35
I did im sorry its been a long 6 hours working on this project. I do have a wire tester and its weird cuz it goes through 1-8 perfectly fine but yet it does all of this weird stuff. I even looped it back into the router with another cable extending one side so it could reach and both ports light up. The multimeter idea is what i figured id do next to make sure there isnt any crosstalk.

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#3
April 19, 2009 at 23:49:19
IF you have a Ethernet cable tester, that should do it. If it shows that the cable is OK (meaning each wire matches up on both ends 1-1, 2-2, etc.), then the cabling is not your problem. What happens if you connect the computer directly to the router with a shorter, pre-made cable?

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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Related Solutions

#4
April 20, 2009 at 08:18:48
You aren't using a wiring "standard" on your cables and probably should.

As RTAdam's said, it's not absolutely necessary as long as both ends are wired the same. BUT, if you have enough RJ-45 ends to do the job, I'd redo it correctly.

There are a plethora of sites online that detail the color schems for both A and B. Find one and do the ends up correctly. You may just find that it does indeed make a difference.

If you have a tester and the cables test OK on it....you don't need a multimeter. I suspect your tester is probably of the "blinking light" variety and doesn't test much except the ability to pump some electrons through. If you have access to a good tester that test's everything, I'd try that instead as it may tell you what, if anything, is wrong with your cables.

A "Limited Connectivity" message could mean something other than the cable is the problem. If you've connected your computer to the router directly with a premade cable as per RTAdam's instructions above and still get that message you've ruled out the cable and that leaves the NIC in the computer and the router itself. If your router is the variety with 4 LAN ports, try each and every one.


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#5
April 20, 2009 at 11:58:41
Yeah i figured whats the harm in just doing it in the way i listed but making sure both sides. I assumed it would not make a difference. Its odd because the cable was new and came stright off the reel and right into the wall and i just ended each side. How much of a difference does it make when running near conduit cable? It does cross over a section of cable but i have had cheeper cable cross over it before and made no difference. ( Im trying to think of every possible scenerio here) I do have a cheap cable tester where it does send a pulsating signal through the cat 6 and it ends up checking out fine which really i guess tells me nothing considering its not working. As for getting a better one i might be able to pull one from the place i work.


I have bypassed the router with a female to female adapter stright into the first router and it still does not get a signal but there are some times where randomally it will come on for a second then turn off. (The port light will blink on and then off).

Are there different rj45 jacks for cat 6 cable or something. I feel like this is something that is going to end up being so simple of a fix......at least i hope.

Im going to make a shorter cable as you said out of the cat 6 i ran in the wall to see if the cable is working at all. (It was new cable-riser i believe)


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#6
April 20, 2009 at 12:29:46
I made a shorter cable with the same kinda cable in the wall with the same wire diagram as the ones in the wall and it works perfectly yet the ones in the wall are not working. Could it be im crossing over the other cables?

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#7
April 20, 2009 at 12:35:39
What kind of cables are you crossing over?

In most cases, it shouldn't make much of a difference but it definitely can. In my own experience, I've seen cable draped over light fixtures, conduit with electrical wires inside etc and never had any big issues with it.

A better tester is a good idea because if there is something wrong, it can tell you. Whereas the blinking light variety can't. If you can't borrow one from work you could always talk to an electrician and pay them to come test it for you. Most commercial electrical installation companies also do data cabling and would have a more comprehensive (and thus, expensive) tester.


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#8
April 20, 2009 at 15:13:52
Are there different rj45 jacks for cat 6 cable or something. I feel like this is something that is going to end up being so simple of a fix......at least i hope.

I didn't notice this the first time I read that post. One thing does come to my mind. There are two types of network cables when speaking in terms of the actual wires. There are solid core and stranded.

You do not want to try to use solid core ends on stranded cable, or the reverse, stranded ends on solid core cable. Your cable is most likely solid core so ensure you're using solid core RJ-45's.


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#9
April 20, 2009 at 16:25:22
Im crossing over the usual power cables that are within your house at least three to four times in different places before it gets to my computer on the 2nd floor. It also runs along side some power cables for a few feet. Im hoping to get a tester here soon.

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#10
April 20, 2009 at 19:36:45
Alright some new information to add to the pot here. Some might be repeated.


As said before i keep checking the wires with the standard "blinking light" tester just to make sure i didnt miss anything. It all comes out ok. When i loop the cables into the router it checks out ok but the difference is that it constantly blinks at a faster rate than normal. This is a netgear router thats wireless g 108mbps. I also have a 16 port dual speed hub that i picked up at a yard sale a while back. When i go from the netgear router into the 16 port hub. No lights show up on the input jack on the hub but every so often it will blink 100M collision light. It does still light up on the netgear router when plugged into the hub, just no lights on the hub side. Yet the cable apparently checks out fine with the ghetto cable tester. Does home depot or lowes sell a cable tester?


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#11
April 20, 2009 at 21:09:06
RxPair Impedance Mismatch at 13 meters. How do i fix that?

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#12
April 21, 2009 at 06:02:44
You may have to pull a new cable in to replace the bad one. Use the one you already have in place to pull the replacement and this time, use one of the standards (A or B) when putting the RJ-45's on. Then test.

You see what I mean now about those blinking light testers being almost useless...


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#13
April 21, 2009 at 06:28:59
Each pair of wires has a different number of twists per inch which creates different levels of Impedance. Ethernet uses pins 1,2,3, and 6 (T568b standard means that's the orange and green pairs). In your case the receive pair (pins 3 and 6) is using blue and green/white which is causing the Impedance Mismatch.

Solution, replace your RJ45 plugs and use the proper wiring standard.


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#14
April 21, 2009 at 12:14:31
Id like to thank everyone who responded to this fourm. All of your input greatly helped me though this 3 day mess and troubleshooting everything, when finally i realized cat 6 cable is stubborn and only wants to be wired one way. In the end it was the ends after all. (GOOD THING I DIDNT HAVE ANY CABLE LEFT). It fixed the problem right away. All is well after that. Hopefully this helps people in the future.

The wiring diagram i used was off another cat 6 cable that worked fine. The diagram is as follows. OW, O,GW,B, BW,G,BRW, BR


And again, Thank you all for responding.


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