Solved Network design for a group of 20 people, advise needed

Microsoft Windows small business server...
April 23, 2012 at 07:30:00
Specs: Windows SBS 2008 STD
Hi all and thanks for reading.

I've been asked to setup a work group of 20 PCs for some specific task, and I'd like to get some advice from you experts.

This is the situation, we are going to start a graphic documentation project where we'll have to work all day with AutoCAD and Corel Draw to digitize vector information from large image files >1GB, we use this files as reference (we do not modify them). Most of the times several users (up to 4 I believe) will have to work with the same image as reference, so I need to setup the required infrastructure for this kind of sharing.

I have received some extra hardware from a partner company:

HP MSA2000 (with 7TB large enough for our project)
2 x HP SAN Switches (HP StorageWorks 4/8 Base SAN Switches)
2 x HP Procurve (24) Gigabit network
3 x HP DL380 servers
1 x HP DL320 server

I don't really know if this can be useful for this kind of setup.

We already have the network of 20 W7 and XP computers. The network is cabled using CAT5E.

How you'd design it?

I was thinking on 2 HP DL380 acting as file server with redundancy, attached to the MSA2000 through the SAN switches, and all 20 PCs connected to a GigaBit network.

Do you think it'll be enough?

Thanks a lot in advance,

Jud



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✔ Best Answer
April 24, 2012 at 06:56:16
My worry is to be sure that we can read the same image file from different clients at the same time. We don't modify the image, we'll use them as the background to vector digitize on top.

At the very worst, if you have no way to connect the SAN switch directly to the rest of the network, clients will still be able to access documentation via the server(s) connected to the SAN.

Considering the servers connect to the SAN via fiberchannel and it is very fast, you won't overload them by having multiple opening the same image file located on the SAN.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
April 23, 2012 at 08:00:59
I was thinking on 2 HP DL380 acting as file server with redundancy, attached to the MSA2000 through the SAN switches, and all 20 PCs connected to a GigaBit network.

Makes sense to me.

I think you would also want the GigaBit switches connected to the SAN switches. That way all clients, and the servers, can talk to the SAN.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
April 23, 2012 at 08:20:51
Thanks a lot Curt,

I didn't know I could connect the GigaBit switches to the SAN switches, so the clients will have direct access to the MSA2000?. Do I need load balancing?. Do you believe it will be a problem if 3 users pan and zoom the same image?.

Jud


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#3
April 23, 2012 at 13:18:25
I didn't know I could connect the GigaBit switches to the SAN switches

I can't say for sure this is an option with your setup, I'm not familiar with the hardware you're using. I should have phrased what I said a little differently, my mistake and I apologize. I should have said "You should check and see if you can".

We have a large SAN/NAS here at work and most servers have direct fiberchannel access to it. But, the SAN/NAS also has two switches that came with it and they are connected to our network. This is a method of allowing other people access to the SAN/NAS.

For example, our network department has a share on the SAN/NAS where we store all our documentation, software, tools etc. (actually, all departments and users do) When I need to update a doc, I open the mapped drive and access the document. This is happening on the SAN/NAS via the switch that connects it to the main network. I don't have a fiber channel connection in my desktop PC in my office right.......lol......I might wish! ;)

The fiberchannel is basically highspeed access for the servers to read/write data to the drives. Non fibrechannel devices access that data via the network.

Check your documents on the equipment and see if it can't be joined to your main network.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#4
April 24, 2012 at 01:15:45
Thanks Curt,

I'll check the documentation.

The hardware comes from a company that has been closed. I'm not familiar with them but it's what we have and I hope we don't need to purchase anything else.

My worry is to be sure that we can read the same image file from different clients at the same time. We don't modify the image, we'll use them as the background to vector digitize on top.

Jud


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#5
April 24, 2012 at 06:56:16
✔ Best Answer
My worry is to be sure that we can read the same image file from different clients at the same time. We don't modify the image, we'll use them as the background to vector digitize on top.

At the very worst, if you have no way to connect the SAN switch directly to the rest of the network, clients will still be able to access documentation via the server(s) connected to the SAN.

Considering the servers connect to the SAN via fiberchannel and it is very fast, you won't overload them by having multiple opening the same image file located on the SAN.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
April 24, 2012 at 07:33:55
Thank you so much, this answer gives me peace :-)

I'll post the results when the setup is deployed.

Jud


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