netbeiu What are the advantages over TCP/IP

March 2, 2011 at 01:57:14
Specs: Windows XP
What are the advantages of NETBEIU over TCP/IP?

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#1
March 2, 2011 at 02:33:09
Perhaps you could put your question into context by telling us why you ask it. Are you thinking of deploying NetBEUI? If so you must have some reason for doing so - what is it? This will help in giving an answer to your question.

If you don't have any particular reason to deploy NetBEUI, then my answer would be - forget it.


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#2
March 2, 2011 at 08:03:29
Looks like another lame homework question to me.................

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
March 2, 2011 at 08:37:25
Yeah - that's what I was getting at in a rather more subtle way. Can't imagine why anyone would want to set up a NetBEUI only network nowadays.

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#4
March 2, 2011 at 09:40:37
It still is a way of creating a secure pipe between two servers when you want one server not to be accessable via the internet.

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#5
March 2, 2011 at 09:52:21
I'd say that's rather a far-fetched scenario which would be better dealt with in other ways. Do you know anyone who runs such a setup?

I used to run a NetBEUI only network way back when we first set up an OS/2 Server network, but that was more years ago than I care to remember.


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#6
March 2, 2011 at 11:10:48
In sql server 2000 that was the MS recommended way for a backend sql server. We ran that way for years at Hyundai

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#7
March 2, 2011 at 11:30:38
The only advantage I can think of is that you can get information about the node with out having to use SNMP. Otherwise, it is almost a dead protocol. It came out at the same time different companies where trying to establish a standard for connecting devices on a network. Let me see if I can remember:

IPX
TCP/IP
NetBIos
Apple Talk

I think there were more but I can't remember. It is still around only because Microsoft supports it. I personally would not use it exclusively because not all devices such as copiers and printers support it. I might use it in conjunction with TCP/IP one because I know how to trouble shoot TCP/IP and two it makes it so I can do scans to get the names of the devices on my network with out having to use SNMP.


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#8
March 2, 2011 at 11:37:30
All of which begs the question of why the OP asked the question in the first place. I suspect we all know the answer to that. ;)

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#9
March 2, 2011 at 12:57:49
In sql server 2000 that was the MS recommended way for a backend sql server. We ran that way for years at Hyundai

Funny you should mention exactly that. I remember years back setting up a clients SQL server like that in order to get it work properly.

Where I'm working presently, we have separate VLAN's (with separate subnets) for server management and backup, aside from the subnet/VLAN they reside on so as to allow everyone to reach them for services/data purposes.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#10
March 2, 2011 at 13:03:49
This was done before vlans.

netbios was the original protocol before tcp/ip became the protocol of choice.
netbeui was the enhances netbios protocol.

We still use netbios today encapsulated in tcp/ip

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