Need to restart DHCP client every time

Microlink / D915gux
August 26, 2010 at 23:27:32
Specs: Microsoft Windows XP Professional, 3 GHz / 3190 MB
Hi everyone,

I have an annoying issue... Since a week or so, I can not connect to the Internet without re-starting the DHCP client through services.msc (I found and tried that solution through Google).

It seems I need to restart after every boot. I have not installed any software in-between except for the WinXP updates (which is set to fully automatic). I'm running avast! antivirus, and my system seems clean.

The desktop that is experiencing problems is wired to a Linksys router (with wireless switched off) which is in turn wired to a Thompson router/modem that connects to the Internet. All other systems in the house connect fine, so I don't think it is a router issue.

I'm not sure if this is related, but I have a dual-boot with Ubuntu 9.10 on this system. When Ubuntu starts, there is no problem. But when it comes out of sleep, the Internet connection is also lost.

Any help here would be very much appreciated!


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#1
August 27, 2010 at 02:28:01
Check, whether the DHCP service is configured to automatically and not to manually start.

If that doesn't help, you have to take a look at the Event Viewer for any hint.

The original poster should always write the last response !!!
Let us know, if the problem is solved !!!


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#2
August 27, 2010 at 02:54:11
Ok...

The DHCP services is set to automatic.

Going through the event viewer (under system) I found an error on the date the issue started. From the time stamp, this must have happened when I shut down the computer, possible while the system was installing the updates that were downloaded.

I see the same error the day after, again at a time when the computer was shut down.

I'm editing the message a bit so to take out the IP address. Sorry if that is foolish or paranoid - I'm rather ignorant and safe than too smart for my own good :-).

Event Type: Error
Event Source: Dhcp
Event Category: None
Event ID: 1002
Date: 18.08.2010
Time: 23:16:36
User: N/A
Computer: (computer name)
Description:
The IP address lease (normal-looking IP address) for the Network Card with network address (alphanumerical) has been denied by the DHCP server 0.0.0.0 (The DHCP Server sent a DHCPNACK message).

For more information, see Help and Support Center at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/even...

Especially this 0.0.0.0 doesn't seem right.

Is this useful?


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#3
August 27, 2010 at 03:27:26
Try out the following:

1. click Start / Run
2. type CMD and click OK
3. in the command prompt windows type in:
ipconfig /release
4. when finished, type
ipconfig /renew

Post back what happens.

The original poster should always write the last response !!!
Let us know, if the problem is solved !!!


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Related Solutions

#4
August 27, 2010 at 03:34:51
Thanks Paul! I have some more information and a suspicion - could you please read through this and see what you think?

As I said in the first message, I have two routers. The one in the living room handles the Internet connection and the wireless. It also is linked to some wired devices there. The IP address of that (Thomson) router ends with 254.

Then there is one cable to a Linksys router which is in the office room. On that router are a pc and a NAS. I had configured the Linksys to act as an access point and had changed the IP address it uses to ending in 99 (instead of the default 1). When I tried to log in to it just now, I found that the 99 address didn't respond, and instead the router is back on 1. I don't know if that is possible, but it seems the thing has somehow reset itself.

The net result is that the Linksys is now also set to use DHCP. Am I right to think I can switch that off, switch off the wireless also, give the Linksys a static address again and let the Thomson handle the DHCP?

Maybe the current conflict is created by that?

I'll let you read this before I try the other possible solution above. If someone has a good overview of how to configure a Linksys wireless router to act as a wired switch, I would also appreciate that.


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#5
August 27, 2010 at 03:39:40
PS Tried your suggestion anyway. The result is that the Internet connection is lost. The information on the screen is:

IP Address: 192.168.1.101
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Default gateway: 192.168.1.1 (--> that would be the Linksys)


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#6
August 27, 2010 at 04:08:58
Yes, so far, it looks well.
And I guess, you haven't got any error message, right?

So let's get to the next step.
Again open a CMD window.
Type in:
ping google.com

Post the result.

Then try this in the command prompt window and post back the result:
ping 74.125.77.147

The original poster should always write the last response !!!
Let us know, if the problem is solved !!!


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#7
August 27, 2010 at 04:17:06
Ping to google.com: ping request could not find host google.com

Ping to 74.125.77.147: request timed out (100% loss)


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#8
August 27, 2010 at 05:35:43
You need to double check the config of both routers. The downstream (second) router needs to be in the same subnet as router 1.

Click on my name above in my response and read my "how-to" guide on "adding a second router". Ensure you have the downstream router setup properly. You may have to do a reset and reconfigure it. Oh, when reading my guide, you're going to want to pay attention to the "LAN to LAN" scenario.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
August 27, 2010 at 05:37:54
Many thanks for that! I am leaving for the weekend now, but will pick this up again on Monday.

I'll post back with the results!


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#10
August 27, 2010 at 05:39:10
Ok, so as I read, you have 2 routers and both are running DHCP. This has to be fixed first.
You must configure both routers to be in the same network and use a fixed internal ip address.
E.g.:
The first router, that also is connected to the internet:
internal ip address: 192.168.1.1
subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
DHCP server: enabled

The WAN (DSL or whatever) interface has to be configured as necessary for your provider. Most providers do assign ip addresses via DHCP. So you get a dynamic ip address at the WAN interface.

Router 2 should have this configuration:
internal ip address: 192.168.1.2
subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
DHCP server: disabled

When you have connected both router by wire and you used a LAN (NOT WAN) port for that router to router connection, you don't need to configure a default gateway on router2 as well as you don't need to configure the WAN port on router 2.

So in this configuration, the computers should get their ip addresses, subnet mask, default gateway and dns server information from the first router and should find the way to the internet.

Make sure, that router1, which suppurts the internet access, can establish a connection to the internet.
This can be checked in the router configuration on the status page.

The original poster should always write the last response !!!
Let us know, if the problem is solved !!!


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#11
August 27, 2010 at 07:28:05
paulsep

All the setup info you've given him is in my guide.......lol.......I got tired of typing it out repeatedly and setup the guide since pointing people to it is quicker and easier. You might want to just toss in a link to it in the future should you respond to another of these type of queries.

I missed the following though. "Ok, so as I read, you have 2 routers and both are running DHCP. This has to be fixed first." and I agree 100%. In the setup we both agree is the correct one for this dual router setup, only one DHCP server is required since clients connecting to the downstream router will get their DHCP from router 1 (upstream).

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#12
August 27, 2010 at 09:02:49
Curt R

Oh yes, that's why I stated to make the Howto's searchable.

I forgot the search the Howto's this time, but will use it next time.

Thank's for the hint.

Paul

The original poster should always write the last response !!!
Let us know, if the problem is solved !!!


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#13
August 29, 2010 at 07:02:45
Just got back from the weekend and configured the Linksys router (downstream) to a fixed IP address (I used .99 - I presume that is ok). Disabled DHCP and WLAN.

I did not fiddle with the Thomson router which is connected to the Internet. That one has an IP ending with .254 "out of the box" and I didn't really want to change anything to it. This router also controls the digital tv signal, and I didn't want to risk anything. The DHCP range is indeed .100 to .199.

As a result, everything seems to connect fine now - all back to normal.

So, many thanks to both of you for helping me out on this one, and especially for helping me think it through! Getting a solution is one thing, understanding it is worth a whole lot more :-).

Problem solved!


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#14
August 29, 2010 at 08:23:24
You are welcome.

The original poster should always write the last response !!!
Let us know, if the problem is solved !!!


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