lose internet during day and high packet loss at other times

June 15, 2012 at 04:02:48
Specs: Windows 7
I am connected via a self-ran cable to a different house. The line is just under 100m, buried shallow. The internet works fine down at the house with the modem but on the other end of the line it is spotty. It generally doesn't work during the day unless it is chilly and/or extremely overcast/inclimate weather. It usually (not always) works at night. Generally it stops around 10AM-12PM and starts working between 8-11PM depending on weather. Recently I tried replacing the router with no noticable difference. When I pingtest and speedtest... the tests run OK (if internet is working obviously) but often have significant (50%) packet loss. I'm nearly positive something is wrong with the cable and/or connections between the routers because it works fine on the end with the modem. What effect can heat/sunlight play on the line? How deep does the line need to be to be protected from UV/sunlight? Should I re-wire all of the plugs to eliminate that problem as well?

It often works GREAT at night with no problems at all, no packet loss and stable/comparable (to the other router by the modem) speedtests.

I don't have the specs on the wire itself but it was rated as an underground ethernet cable... I put the line in last summer and had intermittent (not nearly as bad) issues until early fall, no issues all winter AT ALL and it has just gotten worse and worse this spring and into summer.

If the line is "bad" what sort of cable should I use to protect the connection in the future? The cable company refuses to a run a cable line to our house so getting this done professionally is not an option.


See More: lose internet during day and high packet loss at other times

Report •


#1
June 15, 2012 at 07:07:54
I am connected via a self-ran cable to a different house. The line is just under 100m, buried shallow.

Ok, first thing. 100 m is the maximum segment length using Cat5/5e/6 cable. If you're "just under 100 m" that's going to be an issue. I've found once you exceed about 85 m, you can start to get attenuation which can cause signal degradation.

Has this cable been tested? If not, I'd start by testing it with a proper tester. Not one of those blinking light units either, a real tester. Most any electrical company or network cabling company will have a good tester. Call a couple, get quotes on testing a single cabel (it should be cheap) and have that done so you can see where your cable stands.

The internet works fine down at the house with the modem but on the other end of the line it is spotty.

This to me says the issue is the cable. One thing you can try which may help is putting a SOHO Router at your end of the connection so you're going directly from router to router. I'm going to tell you right now, I don't think this will help. I believe in your case, the cable is just too long. But if you have another router around, or can get your hands on one without spending money, I'd try that for a couple days to see if it helps.

For more info on how to properly add a second router just click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN” You'll want to use the single subnet scenarion wherein you interconnect the two routers "LAN port to LAN port"

You might want to give some serious thought to using wireelss point-to-point antenna's as a solution. I have used EnGenius equipment (if you're interested, google that name) and found them easy to use and quite good. If it were me, I'd go wireless in this instance.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#2
June 16, 2012 at 18:02:53
thanks, I just bought Ubiquiti's NanoStation loco product (point to point wireless). I'd still like to get the ground line running if possible so I'll have to test the line and go from there. Thank you.

Report •
Related Solutions


Ask Question