logon procedure win 7 to server 2008

Microsoft Sql server 2008 standard editi...
November 15, 2010 at 23:25:05
Specs: Windows 7, core 2 dual - 4 gb
I have one DC (2008 r2) and 11 win7 workstations. Can ping anywhere anytime but cannot 'see' the server from the workstations. I have built LANs many times from 1985 through to about 1995 and have used several NOS but now appear to have lost my edge. I have failed to understand something in the setting up of the system. Can anybody help me.

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#1
November 16, 2010 at 07:35:54
Is there a domain.local & did you join the workstations to it?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
November 16, 2010 at 07:59:19
Is this a workgroup or domain? And are all the PC's on the same workgroup/domain?

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#3
November 16, 2010 at 08:07:58
one DC = domain

The usual mistake is dns. Are the workstations pointing to the ms dns server [dc] or to the gateway ip? Needs to be the servers ip for dns on the workstations.

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#4
November 16, 2010 at 12:54:33
Thanks for the response(s). I must apologise for any tardy response that may occur. I have retired from the workforce (72yo) and have volunteered to a couple of community style volunteer organisations. I now cannot get to the LAN site for a couple of days so will use that time to learn from your comments. The LAN is stand-alone with one DC which I will try to use as a file, application and print server. The internet is through an ADSL2 modem into one of the switches (this works). It is a Local domain. I do not know if my responses are visible to all helpful responders to me cry for help so I have sent this to all. DNS is something that I do not remember from my earlier days (last LAN built in 1990) but installation of R2 appears to have installed it with an address of 207.0.0.1 (I think) so further investigation will be carried out. Thanks again.

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#5
November 16, 2010 at 15:17:25
"ADSL2 modem into one of the switches "

Let's hope that modem is really a router. Won't work with just a modem unless you buy ips from the ISP which is not desirable.

"address of 207.0.0.1"
That would be 127.0.0.1 which is the tcp/ip loopback address.

It maybe installed but you still need to configure it so it works properly.

Here is what should happen:

disable dhcp from the router
enable dhcp on the server, set the scope and authorize it.
enable dhcp dynamic updates to DNS
configure dhcp to give out ips/gateway and point to the DCs ip address for dns
get the ISP's dns server ips and enter them in the DNS forwarders tab [not forward lookup zone]

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#6
November 16, 2010 at 23:09:46
Thanks. I will have a go at that as soon as I can get to the site.
I have set up Internet connections on P2P connections. One a Cisco router with a Motorola moden. The modem plugged into the router and the workstations (using XP) plugged into the router. Works first time. Second a Netgear modem/router which of course works. and thirdly a netgear switch with a Telstra BigPond modem. The modem is plugged into the Netgear switch and the workstations are plugged into the switch and everything works.

The DNS and DHCP connections will, no doubt, cause me a small(?) headache but I will attempt what you have suggested.


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#7
November 16, 2010 at 23:11:26
Sorry - forgot to mention - the address you have given is the correct one - I just typed it wrong.

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#8
November 17, 2010 at 07:34:13
That would be 127.0.0.1 which is the tcp/ip loopback address

Just to add to what wanderer said about the loopback.

On the DC (domain controller) when it was promoted DNS should have been setup automatically. All domain clients have to connect to the DC and it's DNS in order to authenticate. To ensure clients connect to the DC, you have to provide them with a DNS address (usually within the DHCP settings). Since 127.0.0.1 is a loopback address, you can't supply that one to clients as their DNS IP.

So, you will need to know the LAN address of your DC and ensure your DHCP settings have the DNS address as being the LAN IP of the DC.

One a Cisco router with a Motorola moden. The modem plugged into the router and the workstations (using XP) plugged into the router. Works first time. Second a Netgear modem/router which of course works. and thirdly a netgear switch with a Telstra BigPond modem. The modem is plugged into the Netgear switch and the workstations are plugged into the switch and everything works.

Your setup is a little confusing and seems complex. Is there a particular reason for the multiple routers like separate subnets; or multiple, separate, internet connections?

If you could give a little more detail on how everything is connected physically this might help us avoid giving you bad advice.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
November 17, 2010 at 12:53:58

Confusion reigns supreme. Here is an upgraded description of the setupS.
One a Cisco wireless/radio router with a Motorola moden. The modem plugged into the router and the some workstations (using Win7, just upgraded) plugged into the router and laptops using the wireless connection. Works first time.
Second a Netgear modem/router which of course works.
and thirdly a netgear switch with a Telstra BigPond modem. The modem is plugged into the Netgear switch and the workstations are plugged into the switch and everything works. These are three different networks in three different locations so there is no complexity. All are P2P so they are easy
At one site (nopne of the above) I have a single switch P2P network with a ‘3’ dongle attached to a single workstation for internet connection and am planning to experiment with attaching the dongle through the switch. Should be in-ter-resting.
My problem . . .too many years away from networks and too many changes to the setup methods.
Thanks for the feedback, I was a little confused with the DNS addresses but I am sure that I will be able to work them into the system correctly now it has been explained.
I will keep information coming on my progress, there is nothing worse than giving help and not getting feedback to find out what has happened.


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