load balance two internet connections

Microsoft Windows server 2008 standard
December 9, 2009 at 00:09:10
Specs: Windows 64
We have two internet connections and was wondering if we wanted to send traffic over one connection than the other what the best way to do that would be?

See More: load balance two internet connections

Report •


#1
December 9, 2009 at 07:11:02
A quick google search of "dual WAN router" brought up many links. I suggest you google that string yourself and get to reading.

Report •

#2
December 9, 2009 at 08:09:47
I take it that question is to complicated,lol

Report •

#3
December 9, 2009 at 08:59:15
No not too complicated. It is a question asked millions of time across the net and thousands of times here.

CurtR saved you some time and directed you to a known solution.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 9, 2009 at 12:08:06
Complicated, no. In fact, I already knew the answer.

However, I'm as lazy as you are...........almost. I actually did type that string into google.

Google is your friend...


Report •

#5
December 9, 2009 at 16:14:09
I was thinking eigrp or bgp. Dual wan routers split the traffic but i was thinknig more in detail.

Report •

#6
December 9, 2009 at 20:32:35
Interesting thought. Not sure how those apply at an end point. Might want to consider mpls.

Report •

#7
December 10, 2009 at 07:23:50
I was thinking eigrp or bgp. Dual wan routers split the traffic but i was thinknig more in detail.

You asked a general question initially. So, you ended up with a general answer.

Next time, ask the entire question at the outset.

Wondering if BGP could be used to provide redundancy with dual external connections is a detail it would have been good to add in your initial request........don't you think?

As a matter of fact, you can use BGP to provide redundancy for dual external connections.

We've recently added a second external connection where I work and now have two 30 Mbps external connections, from two separate providers, in place to provide us with redundancy and we are using BGP to accomplish this.

Which is to say, should the primary fail, the BGP configuration on our secure routers will shift traffic to the secondary.


Report •


Ask Question