Solved Linksys E2500 N router Wi-Fi access limited to Wireless-B

Dell corporation / Inspiron 7720
October 5, 2015 at 15:06:26
Specs: Windows 8.1 64 bit, Intel Core i7-3630QM, 8GB DDR3-1600
I've just recently replaced my old router with a Linksys E2500. I didn't actually buy it, my parents did and then gave it to me as they found they didn't need it after all. Brand new, in the box. Dual band 5ghz and 2.4ghz, Wireless N (with 40MHz wide band capability up to 300mbps). I disabled the 5Ghz band as I don't have any 5ghz devices in the house right now.

However, my Windows 8.1 (via an Intel Centrino wireless-N 2230 wireless adapter) laptop refuses to connect with Wireless N, and continues to use the Wireless G band (as evidenced by this, and this), despite being a maximum of 30 feet away with a direct line of sight. My home internet isn't really fast enough for this to become a problem, but it's infuriating when trying to save a backup (or anything at all) to my local NAS. If I set the router to broadcast with a Wireless N signal only, my laptop loses connectivity completely, and I have to return to my desktop to set it back to Mixed.

So far, I've rebooted both the router and my laptop multiple times, updated the drivers for the wireless adapter, and tried a completely different router. None of these worked. I also booted to my Ubuntu usb drive, and it was able to easily connect via Wireless N, so I know it's probably not a hardware issue.

Thanks in advance for your undoubtedly sage advice.

EDIT: Forgot to mention, there is no co-channel or adjacent channel interference. Living over a mile away from the nearest neighbor and with the microwave at the complete opposite end of the house, I would say my interference levels are null.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq

message edited by OLDISGOOD


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✔ Best Answer
October 13, 2015 at 14:19:01
I seem to have found the solution.

This superuser.com answer refers to the actual 802.11n spec, which apparently requires the use of WMM. I had disabled WMM on the router, as it was causing some throughput issues with some of my older hardware (all of which have now been swapped out for direct Ethernet connections anyway).

As soon as I enabled WMM support on the router and reconnected to the network, I'm getting full wireless N speeds. It seems to me that Windows 8 interprets the spec much more literally than any of my other devices (or OS'es), which led to the odd "one but not the other" problem. It doesn't appear to be switching over to the 40mhz band on auto, however. At least I'm not limited to 54mbps now.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq

message edited by OLDISGOOD



#1
October 5, 2015 at 15:23:05
A couple of easy things to try (probably too hopeful but quick to try):

Discharge the motherboard components like this:
Turn off Computer and remove power cord and main laptop battery. Before re-assembling old the Power Off/On button down for at least 20 seconds.

Next thing, go to Device Manager and see if there are any errors showing under Network Adapters. Expand out to see the Wifi then use the Uninstall. If it offers to remove "Software" say NO. Restart and it will pick up the drivers and set them up again.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
October 5, 2015 at 15:43:51
Thanks, Derek

I did the component discharge. Unplug and remove battery, held power button for about 30sec. No change.

Uninstalled the device and then let it reinstall itself. No change, although it does connect to the network faster.

I should also mention that the network is secured with WPA2-PSK (AES encryption).

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq

message edited by OLDISGOOD


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#3
October 5, 2015 at 17:32:19
In your win8.1 "Wireless Management Networks" delete the Network associated with the router. and let it discover the network again.
On the router: is the wireless channel assignment set to AUTO?

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Related Solutions

#4
October 6, 2015 at 08:24:12
The router was previously set on auto channel width, I set it to 20mhz only, then forgot the network and reconnected on my laptop. Still looks like Wireless G.

Edit: Thanks for your help mods, but the title is misleading. Other wireless N devices in the house can connect to the router at full speed, it's just this one laptop that appears to be having problems.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq

message edited by OLDISGOOD


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#5
October 6, 2015 at 11:26:53
Other wireless N devices in the house can connect to the router at full speed, it's just this one laptop that appears to be having problems.

In light of that I would suspect the issue is that one device. Ensure you have the most up-to-date drivers for the wireless interface and try again. If it won't connect at N, then chances are there's something wrong with the radio on that device.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
October 6, 2015 at 17:16:49
I'll give it a shot, Curt. I just updated my drivers about two weeks ago, but it's a been a persistent problem long before that. I'm thinking it might not be a bad idea to completely uninstall the drivers and reinstall them.

Edit: I reinstalled the drivers on the most recent version, no dice. I also tried reinstalling with the manufacturer-recommended drivers, and they changed nothing. If it comes to buying a new wireless adapter, I would be willing to do it.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq

message edited by OLDISGOOD


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#7
October 13, 2015 at 14:19:01
✔ Best Answer
I seem to have found the solution.

This superuser.com answer refers to the actual 802.11n spec, which apparently requires the use of WMM. I had disabled WMM on the router, as it was causing some throughput issues with some of my older hardware (all of which have now been swapped out for direct Ethernet connections anyway).

As soon as I enabled WMM support on the router and reconnected to the network, I'm getting full wireless N speeds. It seems to me that Windows 8 interprets the spec much more literally than any of my other devices (or OS'es), which led to the odd "one but not the other" problem. It doesn't appear to be switching over to the 40mhz band on auto, however. At least I'm not limited to 54mbps now.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq

message edited by OLDISGOOD


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#8
October 13, 2015 at 14:33:18
That's good to know! Thanks for responding with your fix, hopefully it'll help someone else out in the future.

FWIW, I had no idea that WMM was so closely involved.....just goes to show, you learn something new every day!

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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