LAN only connected to net??

February 3, 2009 at 12:43:43
Specs: Windows XP, p4 3 gigs
1) If you have say 5 PCs and don't want to join them(p2p or client/server etc..) you just want them all to have internet access, do you still need a router or will a switch and modem do it?

2) Does this type of network (if it is even called a network) have a topology, i thought star but them maybe as the PCs aren't actually cabled together then it isn't actually a network..?

3) So once you get all PCs on the internet can you have the switch or router set a bandwidth limit for each PC, like if you had a 16MB line, can you set each PC to only allow up to 3MB or so max..?



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#1
February 3, 2009 at 12:52:09
1) You need a modem to get Internet access, and a router (not a switch!) to share it between computers.

2) All networks have topologies. 5 PCs connected to a router would be a star topology.

3) Yes, if the router supports it. This depends completely on the capabilities of the router.


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#2
February 3, 2009 at 13:01:28
Ok you mean a 2 in 1 router / switch as a pure router does not usually have any LAN (ethernet) ports(aprt from 1 or 2 to connect to a switch rather it's the switching capabilites in the router that supply the ports, maybe you call it all the same thing.


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#3
February 3, 2009 at 13:32:16
Yes, I mean a 2-in-1 router, which virtually all consumer-level routers are. Assumed we were talking about "home" equipment here. And no, I don't call it all the same thing.

In your scenario, the router distributes the internet connection and the switch physically connects the computers to each other, and to the internet. For the sake of simplicity, I assumed you'd be using a router/switch. Even if not, the same logic applies.


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#4
February 3, 2009 at 14:19:28
Ok you mean a 2 in 1 router / switch as a pure router does not usually have any LAN (ethernet) ports(aprt from 1 or 2 to connect to a switch rather it's the switching capabilites in the router that supply the ports, maybe you call it all the same thing.

Pet peeve of mine, calling a SOHO router a router. It's not a router. I could show you a 'real' router. What it is, is a switch with NAT, DHCP and a firewall added to it. But they've commononly been called a SOHO router and the name has stuck.....incorrect or not.


1) You could use a switch connected directly to your modem IF you have a static IP address from your ISP for each computer you want to connect. It's worth noting that static (normally considered 'business level accounts') are more expensive than DHCP ('consumer level accounts') and you pay for each extra IP address (pay through the teeth I might add). So unless you have a lot of extra $$$, I'd recommend the SOHO router and possibly an 8 port switch, depending on how many clients you wish to connect to the internet.

2) Yes, it's a Star with the SOHO router or switch (whatever device everybody is connecting to) as the center of that star

3) Not likely with a SOHO router. For that kind of flexibility you would have to be prepared to spend thousands and get a real router.


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#5
February 3, 2009 at 14:26:31
SOHO routers are not "real" routers.

"ATM Machine" is redundant

the computer is not a "CPU"


and yet we all understand the common (mis)usage of these terms. I'm speaking lingua franca.


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#6
February 3, 2009 at 15:49:55
This is still a bit confsing although i now know(i think) that a pure stand alone switch plus a modem can supply internet to PCs??

Here is where i am stuck, 5 PCs connected to switch(no router device at all here) then the switch to modem. PC2 requests say www.somesite.com. PC2 send its MAC address and http request to switch and switch sends this to modem??

But wait how can the switch send www.somesite.com to the modem if it doesn't deal with domain names or IP's?


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#7
February 3, 2009 at 16:12:45
You're really overthinking this.

Use a router (or SOHO router, or whatever we want to call it) instead of a switch, that's all you need.


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#8
February 3, 2009 at 18:04:49
Don't mean to butt in, but just want to make sure your confusion is cleared up;

"This is still a bit confsing although i now know(i think) that a pure stand alone switch plus a modem can supply internet to PCs??"
No, you've misunderstood what has been posted, a stand alone switch will not work for the application you describe (unless the modem has some kind of routing capability that you haven't mentioned).

"Here is where i am stuck, 5 PCs connected to switch(no router device at all here) then the switch to modem. PC2 requests say www.somesite.com. PC2 send its MAC address and http request to switch and switch sends this to modem??"
The switch is an Ethernet device and can communicate with PC2 using the MAC address, but the Internet works on TCP/IP and a switch is not capable of processing a "http request" because it doesn't deal with TCP/IP.

"But wait how can the switch send www.somesite.com to the modem if it doesn't deal with domain names or IP's?"
Exactly, switches (and hubs) are just Ethernet devices, they don't "know" anything about higher level networking protocols like TCP/IP or UDP or whatever. That's why you have to have a router to connect 5 PCs to the Internet, each PC has to have it's own unique IP address and be connected to a "gateway" which will route IP traffic back and forth from the Internet. The modem will do that with one device (a single PC or a router) but not with multiple devices (but there are broadband modems which also have routers built in).


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#9
February 4, 2009 at 02:03:26
pyrolitic:

That's cleared it up, i am actually talking about cisco kit which don't usually combine devices, like a 2 in 1 router switch etc...

So a stand alone cisco switch + a modem can NOT supply intenet on a LAN you HAVE to always have a router between the modem and switch.......

What exactly is the Gateway is this a PC on your LAN network that you have just chosen to be the Gateway.....??


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