Solved Issue with WiFi range

March 10, 2018 at 18:46:01
Specs: Windows 10, Intel i73.4GHz/12GB DDR3
Hi,

My house is 3,600 sq feet and the walls are plaster. I have an Amped range extender in the office that covers 3,000 sq feet but I have to keep it in the office where the FiOs modem is connected. The wifi rang is ok within the distance from the office to the bedrooms that are close to the office but the wifi range is low from the office where we need wifi to the other end of the house. Is it possible to connect another range extender in the hallway which is between the office and the other end of the house that would provide a stronger signal?


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✔ Best Answer
March 11, 2018 at 00:25:16
Homeplugs and an additionl router at the distant area. Setup the router as a wifi extender. Using an additional router allow will you use its ethernet ports as well.

Simply connect your present router to a homeplug adapter with a decent quality ethernet cable, and connect the additional router similarly to a homeplug adapter in any convenient mains outlet.

KISS approach; and easily adapted, modified etc. if situation requires



#1
March 10, 2018 at 20:15:29
Ideally, you should run an ethernet cable from the FiOS modem to a wireless router set up in the area of poor coverage. OR you can get a pair of powerline adapters & accomplish the same thing without running any cable.

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#2
March 10, 2018 at 20:24:14
I thought about running an Ethernet cable but the way the house is designed I would have to either go through the ceiling or walls. Can you clarify a pair of powerline adapters? If there is a way without running any cable, this might work better. Thanks!

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#3
March 10, 2018 at 20:54:44
Powerline adapters allow Ethernet over power lines, allowing you to place one near your primary FIOS modem/router and a second one at the other end of the house with a second router (disabled DHCP, firewall, etc.) used as a wireless access point, a Wireless Access Point (AP) (preferred), or some powerline adapters offer a version with the secondary side having a built in Wifi access point.
If the need at the other end is a desktop computer and Wifi is not really needed, plugging in directly to the powerline adapter is another option.

My first experience with adding access points was with a secondary router. The next time I purchased a range extender and discovered it had the option of setting it up as an access point as well. This was better. My latest experience was with true AP's that are set up to work together to cover a larger or harder to Wifi building and managed through a desktop program. I did this for a large retail store I work for and it runs flawlessly. This is how enterprise level systems are set up and managed but they are now affordable enough ($80.00 - $129.00US - & up per unit) for small businesses and for larger homes. They do really need network cables run to them and they use POE (Power Over Ethernet) adapters or POE switches to power get power to them instead of a lot of wiring mess. You would then disable any Wifi on the primary router or modem/router if any.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


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#4
March 11, 2018 at 00:25:16
✔ Best Answer
Homeplugs and an additionl router at the distant area. Setup the router as a wifi extender. Using an additional router allow will you use its ethernet ports as well.

Simply connect your present router to a homeplug adapter with a decent quality ethernet cable, and connect the additional router similarly to a homeplug adapter in any convenient mains outlet.

KISS approach; and easily adapted, modified etc. if situation requires


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#5
March 11, 2018 at 08:07:51
If you could easily pull a cable (and it sounds like you can't do that easily) I would suggest an Access Point before I would recommend buying another SOHO router.

If I were you, I would look into a wireless bridge (extender) device that connects via wireless. It would extend your wireless range and doesn't require additional cabling or the expense of the powerline adapters.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

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#6
March 11, 2018 at 10:24:21
My reasoning for power-line adapters (or a cable if viable) to extend wifi - using a router - is that the link is usually (in my own limited experience) more stable and constant and likely faster etc. than simply wifi to wifi. The two routers - main and remote - will be permanently attached to one another; without risk of wifi failure of the link between when done wifi only.

I've tried both approaches with an assortment of extenders only; and using a spare router to same end - that second router being ultimately connected via ethernet (homeplugs) from the primary router.

Wifi to wifi is vulnerable to what's in the way of the signal - in terms of building structure and materials therein. Actual physical ethernet connection (if viable) or homeplugs avoids that issue completely.


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