Is this possible and how?

August 10, 2010 at 00:06:39
Specs: N/A
I plan on setting up a network where i will have 12 computers and 20 phones. I want the phones to use a business DSL connection and the computers to use a cable connection. The problem is that about 7 computers will share the same ethernet port as a phone. My question is can i use a switch to seperate and route traffic to two different routers which are two different ISPs, and how?

See More: Is this possible and how?

Report •


#1
August 10, 2010 at 00:28:07
why not get a 12 port router with wireless ?


Report •

#2
August 10, 2010 at 00:42:35
While that is a great idea as a last resort, i dont think i want to risk putting wireless on seven computers if i can avoid it.

Report •

#3
August 10, 2010 at 00:58:11
"will share the same ethernet port as a phone" ???

DSL = 20 phones

Cable = 12 PC's

Where do you intend to put the other 7 ??


OR do you mean that you want 12 PC's on one network, 7 having DSL internet and 5 having cable internet ??

http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarg...


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 10, 2010 at 01:07:17
each IP phone has an additional ethernet port and acts like a switch so that a computer and phone can share a single ethernet port in the wall. id like all computers to use the cable internet connection and all phones to use the dsl connection. the other 13 phones are in locations that will be shared with a computer. For the 7 computers/phones that share a single ethernet port, id like to route the traffic so that voice goes through one connection and data goes to another.

Report •

#5
August 10, 2010 at 05:50:39
You need to read the manual's for your VoIP phones and talk to the manufacturer. I suspect your VoIP phones will require VLAN tagging and in order to do that you'll need a switch that's capable of VLAN tagging and a router.

If you have the budget, the logical thing to do would be to purchase a Layer 3 switch that's VLAN capable (if VLAN's are required for your VoIP phones to work). If you got a 24 or 48 port switch, you wouldn't have to plug PC's into the phones.


xenomorphuk

why not get a 12 port router with wireless ?

I've never heard of a SOHO router with 12 ports, can you post a link?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#6
August 10, 2010 at 09:14:01
What brand/model phone system are you using? How is the voice service being delivered to your phone system?

Report •

#7
August 10, 2010 at 10:17:54
Yes a layer 3 switch is what i was thinking however i was trying to avoid the $900 price tag for a decent switch. The issue isn't the amount of portson the switch, it is not having the ability to tear down the drywall and run additional wiring from each workstation to the server room.

The phones are polycom IP 330 and IP550 which will work off of a trixbox phone server. The phone server will utilize sip trunking.


Report •

#8
August 10, 2010 at 10:39:38
I asked make and model because some IP phone can operate Layer 2 and still pass through Layer 3 data. We had a setup like this using a 3com NBX. We had a T1 for voice and one for internet. Not sure if the polycom can do it, but worth a check. Still might need a switch though.

Report •

#9
August 10, 2010 at 10:45:06
$900 isn't a whole lot....in fact, I would say that makes the switch you're looking at a "low-end of the scale" switch. But, if it does VLAN tagging and is Layer 3 (and therefore can do your routing) it should work.

The issue isn't the amount of portson the switch, it is not having the ability to tear down the drywall and run additional wiring from each workstation to the server room.

One does not tear down the drywall to pull cables.

Is this a house or a place of business?

Is the ceiling in the rooms a drop (tile) ceiling or is it drywalled?

If it's a drop ceiling, you drill (or if it's steel stud, cut) a hole in the 2x4 along the top of the wall where you want an outlet. Then you cut a hole in the drywall at the correct height above the floor for where you want your outlet(s) to be. You then push a fishtape down through the hole in the top 2x4 to the outlet hole and pull back a piece of twine. You then use the twine to pull your cable(s) down to the outlet hole.

You can buy outlet cut-in's that don't require mounting to a stud that slip in the hole and then screw down in place. You punch your cables, attach the keystone to the faceplate and then mount the faceplate to the outlet cut-in. It goes without the other end of the cables go back to your central distribution point and are punched there. Then you test.

Depending on the ceiling, it can be an easy job, or a hard one. If your ceiling is drywalled, forget it.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •


Ask Question