Solved Is Static IP better or Dynamic IP?

Microsoft Windows xp professional editio...
October 27, 2009 at 02:14:45
Specs: Microsoft Windows XP Professional, 2.8 GHz / 509 MB
I was changing my ISP.My new ISP is providing both Static and Dynamic IP.

What are the main differences and advantages between the two and also is either of two better for hosting game servers and playing games?


See More: Is Static IP better or Dynamic IP?

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#1
October 27, 2009 at 05:59:22
If you plan on hosting game servers then you'd want a static IP.

As far as the actual playing games goes, either works just fine.


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#2
October 27, 2009 at 07:16:28
The only difference is the price you pay. If you have money to throw away, opt for static IP. Otherwise choose dynamic IP.

i_Xp/VistaUser


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#3
October 27, 2009 at 08:15:18
✔ Best Answer
The question of static vs dynamic is more about functionality.
Though game, ftp, email front ends, web servers can work with dynamic you have the extra step of having to use dynamic dns.
Static assignments are a "go to this exact place" whereas dynamic ip is "just get on the internet".
Given your example of playing a game the server should be static whereas the pc playing the game should be dynamic.

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Related Solutions

#4
October 27, 2009 at 13:10:27
The bottom line is statics are always better.

You don't have to worry about drops when lease times change. They are better only by a small amount in that respect. But it may affect any networked use when the lease tries to renew. I don't play games but it it were me I'd want 100% up time. You can't tell when your ISP needs (wants) to renew leases.

Statics are easier to configure very secure VPN's.

I suspect you'd pay much more for static but they make all two way access easier to configure.

My guess is their offer comes with a price tag.


Dynamics are good enough to most people and small companies even. If you use access such as web and email you'd never know the difference.


Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#5
October 27, 2009 at 14:53:51
You never get drops with dhcp renewing. That is not how it works.

The client actually does a request for a new lease hours in advance of the actual lease expiring.

You can review this information here
http://www.tcpipguide.com/free/t_DH...

Statics are not always better. Anyone who has had to convert a large company using static to dhcp knows this. Statics require extensive documentation, and the cost of maintaining that documentation whereas the dhcp server has all the info you need.


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#6
October 27, 2009 at 20:07:59
Yes actually people always get drops, delays, time outs and more caused by lease issues. In theory it should work perfectly. In actual use it does fail.

I agree that there are uses for both and reasons for both but I thought the question was about a home or soho user with a few numbers to the web.

No, we have large numbers of static IP's since almost all our plants are similar. We only use dynamic for common intranet and internet computers. Not sure it does take more work. Either way you have to keep track of everything and where it is and how it is run through the lan and wan. It all should be documented.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#7
October 28, 2009 at 07:40:21
Oh man..........here we go again..............

jefro, I've never encountered "drops" due to lease issues. As wanderer said, the renew request normally happens before the actual lease expires. This is done specifically to avoid losses of connectivity.

For example:

I have DHCP for my ADSL at home. If I never change the hardware (MAC address) connected to the line, I maintain the same IP address indefinitely.....it just keeps renewing. I've had the same one now for several years.

Just how long do you think I'd keep paying these guys my hard earned money if I lost connectivity whenever the lease expired and my IP had to be renewed? How long would anybody? The answer is, neither I, nor anybody else........including you...........would continue paying good money to be disrupted. We'd drop that provider like a bad habit and sign up with someone who was able to provide us with continuous connectivity.

What about in the work environment. Most business networks run on private IP's and DHCP. Just how long do you think the IT people would stay employed if their boss(es) constantly got disconnected while working or surfing online?



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#8
October 28, 2009 at 13:01:19
The original question is a personal or soho users asking which is better.

Which would you use if you had the choice? I'd bet you'd use the static. I know I would. Tell us the truth.

How's that grab you?

Looking through my books I see chapters and chapters on monitoring and troubleshooting dhcp alone. What gives there? Do you mean you have never had issues with dhcp?

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#9
October 28, 2009 at 14:30:33
The OP's question was about differences and advantages between the two and which is best for game serving and playing.

What you provided was a prejudice based on I don't know what. It would have been the same if you had said "only use static" or "only use dhcp". That is your opinion but not based on the facts, common practices or how the technology actually works.

This statement really reveals this:
"people always get drops, delays, time outs and more caused by lease issues."

There is never a "delay" or "drops" or "time outs" caused by lease issues. This just shows you don't know how dhcp works. What you describe are all network issues not related to dhcp. The same things would happen with static assignments.

You now ask if ever had issues with dhcp. My answer is no. Its been from the wkst nic to the server or the server that has always been the issue not dhcp. In other words it has always been a physical/networking issue not a dhcp issue.

Jefro I really don't intend to rag on you about these things. But I feel compelled to address misinformation and misconceptions. There is already too much of that on the web. We don't need it here also.

And do feel free to challenge anything I write here. Just provide the rebuttal web links like I do for you.

Best of luck.


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#10
October 28, 2009 at 18:12:09
Answer the question. Which would you use if you had a choice? Then why don't you say it? You would use static no doubt in my mind. Why are you trying to say you'd pick the dynamic. What, you going to fool with waiting for game servers to find your new IP, Wait for Dynamic DNS servers to repoint to your system.


You do fail to understand some very basic things. When your ip changes in the middle of a game no matter what there is going to be packets destined towards your computer that will be delayed or lost. A game player does not need that. We are not talking about simple web surfing.

No dhcp change is sent to all computers and routers across the world. It does take time to resync. Look at wireshark and watch it. I never said that there was a great deal of difference but enough for someone that wants the most up time. How can you possibly dispute that?

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#11
October 29, 2009 at 06:03:39
Which would you use if you had the choice? I'd bet you'd use the static. I know I would. Tell us the truth.

Apparently you didn't read my post. So I'll spell it out for you. My IP never changes and won't unless I change the MAC of the device connected to it. Luckily my UNIX box is easily capable of MAC spoofing as is most any SOHO router so that's moot. I can, and will keep my same IP for many more years.

Now, add on to that the fact that I don't run any kind of web server or p-to-p file sharing applications and therefore have no real need for a static IP and well.........I'll sum up:

I wouldn't pay extra for a static when I essentially have that already and don't have any requirements for static.

Did I answer your question clearly enough jefro?

Oh and just for the record, I've hosted games many times without issue.

Looking through my books I see chapters and chapters on monitoring and troubleshooting dhcp alone. What gives there? Do you mean you have never had issues with dhcp?

And to answer your last question........I've never had any issues with DHCP that I've setup. I've had to fix other peoples mistakes but once I've had it setup, it's worked fine.


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#12
October 29, 2009 at 08:03:57
I would chose what worked best for the situation. I would not just choose static because its static.

"When your ip changes in the middle of a game.."

Jefro you continue in your ignorance on the subject. That NEVER HAPPENS. The lease was renegotiated upon bootup that day. Read the link I provided.

Why are you choosing to not be teachable?


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#13
October 29, 2009 at 13:12:41
I don't think you guys are honest here.

You are barely civil which really is an improvement over some other posts which you guys went berserk. I appreciate you guys are trying to be civil though. It is a good start..

"My new ISP is providing both Static and Dynamic IP."

Personally I'd choose the static. There are plenty of advantages to it. I can't think of one downside to having a static IP.

As I stated long ago the difference is very small and there are some ways around most of the issues. But, if I had a choice I'd always choose the static. No one said any cost so why say that. In fact the better packages do offer static included in price.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#14
October 29, 2009 at 13:53:11
I don't think you guys are honest here.

Right, that's always a perfect way to have a discussion, start out by calling the other person (people) liars....


You are barely civil which really is an improvement over some other posts which you guys went berserk. I appreciate you guys are trying to be civil though. It is a good start..

I've never not been civil. Sift through the multitude of my responses to your silly answers and you'll see I've been nothing but civil in my attempts to prevent you from handing out bad advice. Believe me, you'd know quite quickly if I wasn't being civil. In fact, I wager if I weren't, Justin would be deleting those particular responses.....lol

Personally I'd choose the static. There are plenty of advantages to it. I can't think of one downside to having a static IP.

Well, I'm not sure where you are from, or where you live now but where I live and am from, Canada, static DSL packages are classified as "business" level and are therefore more expensive than "home" class, which are dynamic.

So, that's one good reason I can think of for not going with static............the expense.

Just because it appears you've missed what I've said now in two previous responses, I'll reiterate my other reasons:
- I'm not running any web servers or point-to-point file transferring software so I have no requirement for a static IP address
- My present "home" class dynamic package gives me the same IP address every time the lease comes up for renewal as long as my MAC address doesn't change. So it is, in effect, the same thing as static for all intents and purposes.

As I stated long ago the difference is very small and there are some ways around most of the issues.

What issues exactly? You mentioned disconnects but as I've stated previously, I've never experienced any disconnects due to lease renewal.....ever.......either at home or in a work environment. So aside from that, what other issues are you talking about here?

But, if I had a choice I'd always choose the static.

Wonderful! I'm happy for you. I'll keep the extra $$$ in my pocket thankyouverymuch and spend it on something else. I have no "need" for static so couldn't be bothered.

In fact the better packages do offer static included in price.

Sure, but whether it's included in the 'package', or is an add-on to the 'package' you still pay the extra $$$ for a static IP.

So just out of curiosity jefro, since we're having a discussion, where exactly is you live? If you're not now living in your home country, where were you born. I've already said clearly here and in other threads that I'm born and raised in Canada and still living here and I just thought it might be nice to know where you're from.


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#15
October 29, 2009 at 19:36:51
Jefro it has never been my intention to be uncivil. I want to approach life with grace, kindness, class and generosity. I do my best to reflect those ideals in my online presence.

If you have ever felt insulted by what I have written please except my apologies.

It is a hard line to hold being passionate about technology and tempering your response to an unseen unknown recipient.

I can only read your written words. I try to read between the lines to understand what you may mean. Some times I agree with you. Number of times what I read, I disagree with.

How do we establish rules of the road so we can disagree but you don't feel like you are being insulted?


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#16
October 29, 2009 at 22:06:19
Hey guys cool down.I have been watching watching from the sidelines and its heating up here now.

For all of you,I am currently using Dynamic IP and there are no downtimes.Not even in online games,they run smoothly.I just have problems hosting games.

I just wanted to know whether there are any other differences between Static and Dynamic IP other than Static being better in Hosting and Dynamic being better in anonymity.


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#17
October 30, 2009 at 06:04:34
I just wanted to know whether there are any other differences between Static and Dynamic IP other than Static being better in Hosting and Dynamic being better in anonymity.

See my original response (#1), it's still the correct answer from a gaming perspective (hosting or playing).

XpUser's response (#2) is equally correct and deals with cost.

Wanderer's response (#3) is as correct as 1 and 2 and deals with a more technical aspect of static vs dynamic.

I apologize for your thread getting caught up in a situation you didn't ask for. It's just jefro occasionally gives out advice that's not so good and both wanderer and I feel it's better to say nothing at all than it is to give out the wrong advice and try to correct it before it leads the person asking the question down the wrong path.

We're trying very hard (and civilly I might add) to help jefro understand, grow, and learn. I suspect he takes it as a personal attack and gets defensive and digs his heels in instead of taking it for what it is, another professional saying, "Yo, hey bud, you're mistaken (not a big deal, we're all wrong from time to time because we're all human) and here's the correct info"

I'm frequently wrong (just ask my wife.....lol) and have been corrected more than once in these forums. In fact, if I'm not mistaken, wanderer has given me a nudge from time to time when I give an incorrect answer because I misunderstood, or just plain old read the question wrong (happens when I hurry some times). Instead of getting defensive, I thank him (or whomever) and learn from it and carry on without taking offense.

Personalities aside, I hope we've managed to answer your question for you.


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