Is my ethernet cable broken?

December 31, 2016 at 02:14:55
Specs: Windows 64
I was recently re-routing my 100ft long Ethernet cable to my room and now it doesn't work. It worked perfectly fine before moving the cable.. however while I was moving and wiring it through my house I noticed some twisting within the cable but didn't think much of it. When plugged back in it wont connect. Both ends of the cable are in great condition but when plugged into the router I noticed the port blinks green while the others are solid. I check the cable for any physical damage and found none. Does this mean the cable if no good and I need to get a new one or is it something I can fix? Thank you for reading.

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#1
December 31, 2016 at 02:45:53
I assume router LAN port and PC (or other device?) LAN port are set to Auto Negotiate. Try to set one side to a fix speed (10Mb) and check if the links comes up. If it works on 10Mbs try to change to 100Mbs and check if link comes up. Possible (if available) 1GB may be problematic because of cable length and cable degradation.

message edited by sluc


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#2
December 31, 2016 at 02:54:00
How do I go about setting the speed? and yes LAN port to PC. I tried switching the ports to see if that made a difference but got nothing. I believe the cable is a 10Mb cable

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#3
December 31, 2016 at 03:21:27
Windows version??
Is this a CAT 5, 5E, 6 cable?

http://www.home-network-help.com/sp...

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Related Solutions

#4
December 31, 2016 at 06:25:19
Were you rough when pulling the cable? Rig up a test light or a buzzer & test each wire one at a time.

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#5
December 31, 2016 at 07:47:11
You might wish to consider PowerLine adapters (see Google). They use the domestic power as an Ethernet cable (you put one at the device and the other at the router). They work well for me and are a lot less messy than cable. You can add more if required and synchronise them together by pressing a button.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
December 31, 2016 at 10:43:58
It is a Cat5e cable

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#7
December 31, 2016 at 12:51:58
Figured it out. I ran along with several other cables, some power cables, and I believe that was the issue. Once I found another path without any cords, it worked like a charm. Thank you for all of you that helped!

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#8
December 31, 2016 at 16:36:45
Good to hear and thanks for popping back to let us know.

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#9
January 1, 2017 at 08:20:26
Crosstalk between the Cat cables & power cables? Interesting. I found these comments:

"Data cables should not be run in parallel with alternating current (AC) power cables since they will pick up the 50/60 Hz alternating current by inductive coupling."

"Data cables may safely cross AC power cables at right angles, since this minimizes coupling. The greater the distance between data and AC power cables, the less the coupling."

http://control.com/post.php?id=1026...


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#10
January 1, 2017 at 10:08:27
riider,

Thanks for quoting about crossing cables and power lines
versus in parallel. I've wondered and worried about that for
decades, but what you say matches what I guessed.

In the case of a break or poor connection in a data cable,
specifically Ethernet, my circa 2009 Asus motherboard had
a built-in time-base reflectometer to test the cable. I never
used it, but it could send a signal through the cable and
measure the time it took for the signal's reflection to return,
which gave a good approximation of the distance from the
motherboard to the break or poor connection.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#11
January 1, 2017 at 12:30:42
Yep, cables lined up in parallel are effectively small transformers but without the coiling which increases efficiency.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
January 1, 2017 at 14:37:58
If you need to run long LAN cables and want to keep max. speed, use a shielded cable like CAT6. It separates the transmit and receive signals from each other and from outside induction/interference. The cost is higher but it will last longer as it can handle up to 10Gbs, your next big thing in the future....

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#13
January 3, 2017 at 05:05:50
Jeff

I've been away for a while and only just saw this post. Had I seen this when it originally came out I would have asked about interference. When running any kind of copper you want to avoid lights, fans, and electrical cable. While crossing the odd light isn't likely to ruin a signal, running alongside electrical for a long time will....as in this case.

Of course those types of interference don't apply to fiber.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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