I want to setup a lan with 30 system

September 4, 2014 at 06:13:22
Specs: Windows 7
I have a lab with 30 systems and two 16 port switches. I do not want to attach a router. I attach 15 pc to each of the switch with the straight through cable and the two switches by the cross over cable. but still I do not able to connect the pc on different switch. the pc on the same switch are connected. Should I change the IP address. I gave the IP address to the 30 PCs as 192.168.1.01 to 192.168.1.30. please help me asap.
thanks

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#1
September 4, 2014 at 07:11:20
Are the switches managed or unmanaged?

Include the make/model of them with your response so we know what we're working with.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
September 4, 2014 at 07:14:54
Are you sure the crossover cable is good?

What brand and model are the switches?


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#3
September 4, 2014 at 07:19:27
The model of switch is D-Link DGS 1016D. and yes the crossover cable is good enough. and I think the model is unmanaged.

message edited by praveens1975


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Related Solutions

#4
September 4, 2014 at 08:00:52
Do the switch ports indicate a link on the uplink ports?

The ports are auto sensing, so you should be able to use a standard patch cable for the uplink. Have you tried that?


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#5
September 4, 2014 at 08:09:25
the ports on which the cross cable is connected does not indicate a link.

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#6
September 4, 2014 at 08:10:54
should I use a straight through cable to connect these swithes

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#7
September 4, 2014 at 08:15:03
Yes, using a straight thru (patch) cable is the normal way to uplink now that switches are auto sensing. We have hundreds of switch and always use straight thru cables on the uplinks.

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#8
September 4, 2014 at 08:23:59
Thanks bro I will use a patch cable and see if it will solve the problem
Thanks again

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#9
September 4, 2014 at 09:39:10
Yes, using a straight thru (patch) cable is the normal way to uplink now that switches are auto sensing.

I beg to differ. It might be "normal" for people using low-end unmanaged equipment but those of us who work in enterprise networks who work with L2/L3 equipment tend to use crossover cables when using copper to link switches. It can save you some headaches when troubleshooting network issues.

It's worth noting that the fiber optic cables have to be crossed.


and yes the crossover cable is good enough

And you know this how? Unless you've tested it on a real tester (ie: not one of those useless cheap $20 blinking light pieces of junk) you don't know. Definitely try another cable....either crossover or straight through. If the other cable works and the ports on both ends light up, then your crossover cable wasn't "good" after all.

the ports on which the cross cable is connected does not indicate a link.

Did you try different ports on the switches?

ie: if you have them plugged into port 1 on both, try port 16.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#10
September 4, 2014 at 10:10:21
Curt, I beg to differ.

I do work in an enterprise network using high end L2/L3 managed switches. We switched from using crossover on the uplinks partly because it did save some headaches when troubleshooting network issues.


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#11
September 4, 2014 at 12:47:24
Well, we'll just have to agree to disagree then. :)

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#12
September 4, 2014 at 14:26:00
Not sure if I am correct here, but if the switches are managed then 2 of the ip addresses will be reserved for them?

With an IP address range of 192.168.1.01 to 192.168.1.30, this would only provision enough addresses for 28 end devices with 2 being reserved for the switches?

This probably doesn't address the original question but I thought I would put it out there.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.


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#13
September 4, 2014 at 14:53:53
@btk1w1,

You're confusing the number of available switch ports with the number of IP addresses within a subnet.

The OP didn't say what netmask/CIDR he is using, but presumably it's 255.255.255.0 i.e. /24 network in which case the range of available host addresses would be 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254 and the switches should be statically set to an IP that is outside of the DHCP range i.e. above x.x.x.30 in this case.

message edited by FishMonger


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#14
September 4, 2014 at 16:03:15
Ahhhh... Yes. Cheers FishMonger you're right.

I was thinking in terms of available ip addresses within a subnet. 255 in this case with one reserved for broadcast? Sorry to thread jack. Just brought back memories from learning it years back.


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#15
September 5, 2014 at 07:02:27
Actually, in a case of /24 subnet, you would have 254 available IP's. Those would be .1 through .254
.255 is your broadcast address

Besides which, if you're using managed switches (those aren't, both FishMonger and I asked about make/model to ascertain whether or not these were) you would have your switches (and all other network appliances as well) on their own management network. Or at least, I would. I suspect FM would too.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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