Solved HP Network Printer problem

August 23, 2011 at 18:50:54
Specs: Win7 Home Premium, Core i7 4gb
On a small home network I have a Win2K system that hosts 2 HP printers and it's sole function is to act as printserver. Until recently all other client systems on the network were running XP 32bit.

Have recently acquired two HP laptops running Win7 home premium 64bit.

I have been unable to add the network printers to either laptop due to missing drivers.
If I attach the printers by USB to the laptops they will successfully install. Win7 contains suitable drivers for direct attachment. The HP website has support documentation relating to mixed operating system network environment but only deals with the situation where the printers are being hosted on a 64 bit Win7 machine with 32bit clients. My situation is the opposite.
Does anyone know of a workaround?

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#1
August 23, 2011 at 20:17:28
Found the answer on another forum
http://social.technet.microsoft.com...
First response by Arthur Xie worked a treat.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#2
August 24, 2011 at 07:32:04
✔ Best Answer
Using the model number of the printer, go to HP's website and download the Windows 7 drivers for it and use those to install the printer on your Windows 7 machines.

Once you have the correct drivers, you can then install the device on your Windows 7 computers. For information on the correct way to install the printers, click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Installing a Network Printer: version 2

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
August 24, 2011 at 14:48:26
Thanks Curt.

I've read your guide and it basically follows the same advice I found earlier, however I believe your final note relating to situations where the "network" printer is attached to a remote system by USB or Parallel cable ( my exact situation) would only work if the network employed static IPs. Since I do not use static IPs in my home network I need to create a new Local port using the host computer's network name and printer share name, rather than creating a TCP/IP port.
Perhaps you would care to revise your guide.

It just seems stupid of Msoft to have a printer wizard that does not work intuitively. If you want to add a network printer you have to ignore the "Add a Network Printer" option and instead select to add a local printer then create & configure a "Local" port with the printer's network credentials. Yeah. That's so easy & logical I wonder why I didn't think of it first. end of rant.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#4
August 25, 2011 at 08:23:54
Perhaps you would care to revise your guide.

I might if I thought it necessary but it really isn't.

In a small home environment with a SOHO Router doing the DHCP, each PC will get the same IP every time it's renewed. In fact, even in a larger scale DHCP server, the default is to always lease the same IP to the same MAC address.

This is true for many highspeed clients. For instance, my ADSL, I get the same IP every time the lease is renewed unless I change hardware. I used to have a 2wire combination unit from my provider that was the modem/router and an AP all in one. It started to screw up (wireless wasn't working properly) so I asked them to send me a new modem. A modem only, and bought a reliable SOHO Router. Before shutting down the 2wire, I made note of it's external MAC and spoofed that on my replacement router and when I fired it up, I had the same external IP I've had for years. Had I left the external MAC on the replacement router what it was when I bought it, I would have received a different IP address. Since I regularly remote into my home network, I like keeping the IP the same ergo my spoofing the MAC.

If you're curious at home, open a command prompt window on your PC/laptop and do the following commands in order (waiting for them to finish):

ipconfig /release

ipconfig /renew

The first command releases your TCP/IP settings and the second is a DHCP request for TCP/IP settings. Do it as many times as you like. I wager you'll get the same IP every time.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
August 25, 2011 at 18:48:03
Thanks again for the detailed explanation Curt.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#6
August 26, 2011 at 07:48:11
Always happy to help! :)

I guess I should have mentioned, Hostnames are dependant on DNS. If you use the IP, then DNS can malfunction and you're still able to send print jobs. I do the same thing when mapping a drive to a server......use the IP instead of hostname....for the very same reason

Typically though, I would assign a static IP to a computer with a device like a printer attached to it so it can never change no matter what happens. Any network service (server, printer, print server, etc) should always have static IP's.

Just remember if you decide to use a static IP on the computer(s) with the printer attached to check your DHCP scope and use one that's not in the scope (so as to avoid duplicate IP issues).

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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