How to setup a router

Gateway / Mx6436
February 13, 2013 at 17:08:15
Specs: Windows XP, 1.794 GHz / 1370 GB Ram
May I know what things I should ask technical support when setting up a router? I want to get a WISP type device and would like to know what I need to ask before purchase.

Currently I use a public network that has been a pain for years and was wondering why its default configuration is no good when using it as a public WAN.


See More: How to setup a router

Report •


#1
February 14, 2013 at 07:11:01
The first thing you need is account with a WISP (Wireless Internet Service Provider).

When you have one they will be able to provide you with all the information you need.

A public wi-fi network is not a WISP

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wirele...

Stuart


Report •

#2
February 14, 2013 at 14:20:13
That is good reading material however could it also have a new meaning today?

Here is a device description copied:

"The Wireless ISP (WISP) mode is a combination of the Bridge and Gateway modes, in which the router still relies on the main gateway to provide access to the internet, but it retains use of the built-in firewall and DHCP services. This is ideal for when you want to limit or control access to the LAN or internet for an individual subset of users."

...where its description implies that it is a one time fee when purchasing the device as it is the device that provides a certain configuration that is needed by the buyer.

In my case however I need it to prevent unauthorized access to my personal computers when using the public/shared network that has its settings set at default which apparently are not very good settings if they allow users to hack into each others personal space.


Report •

#3
February 14, 2013 at 14:54:51
That description appears to be a poor translation from a another language.

There is no "wisp" mode
You don't bridge and do nat [gateway] at the same time
Firewall doesn't control users.

Who do you plan on going with for the service? Verizon? AT&T?

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
February 14, 2013 at 15:07:47
The description is little different from any other router. To make use of of WIPS you need to subscribe to a Wireless Internet Provider. For that you will pay a regular fee just like any other Internet Service Provider.

Instead of using a Cable or DSL MOdem, you use a Wireless Modem to connect to the service.

A wireless router is not a wireless Modem.

Stuart


Report •

#5
February 15, 2013 at 09:59:23
You would also be dealing with a MIFI device if using a cellular service.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MiFi

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#6
February 19, 2013 at 19:08:42
nevermind, found what I was looking for.

Yes there is a device that can be used as a "main router" with all main router/gateway features that will connect to a public network using its wireless and the device I am looking at describes it as a wireless client router or the DLink DAP-1160 which the DLink Rep says will work for the application I am in need of.

Just don't like how it is wireless G only. Don't know why any bridge/access point does not have these features but with only one choice to choose from ...

It only makes sense that a WISP device would be able to function for what I need?

Back to my inquiry, what non default Dlink settings can be changed to disable ICMP(?) or anything else that one would want when setting up a public network to prevent mischief on the network?



Report •

#7
February 20, 2013 at 08:06:11
In mixed mode it does g and b. Just no n.

To use a wisp device you need a wisp provider. Who have you chosen?

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#8
February 20, 2013 at 18:49:02
I think you are misunderstanding what WISP is.

I public wi-fi network is not a Wireless Internet Service Provider.

To connect to a WISP you need Wireless Modem, not a wireless router.

A public wi-fi network is not different than any other wi-fi network that anyone my set up in their own home. The only difference is, it is public. Most wi-fi networks are private.

Stuart


Report •

#9
February 21, 2013 at 07:08:47
Beg to differ. Mifi is supplied by a wisp and is both modem, router and access point.

http://whatis.techtarget.com/defini...

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#10
March 6, 2013 at 18:16:13
This is sold in Europe and I am guessing that because of the amount of people in such a small area that the demand for such a device is more than the average North American.

D Link DAP 1160.

Its not what I use but it is an example that there is a device that will accomplish such a setup.

Sorry if my original request had the term WISP in it. When first trying to contact manufacturers I was having problems of the technical help loosing interest or maybe just falling asleep when trying to describe what my needs were exactly which was to connect to an existing main router using its wireless with all the functions of a main router.

Take care and thank you for your suggestions...


Report •

Ask Question