Solved How to properly use a LAN Cable Splitter?

August 18, 2014 at 10:12:15
Specs: Windows XP
Will a LAN cable splitter work without a router if the intent is to only use one computer at a time? I would only use this to avoid switching the Cat5 cable from the Ethernet (in) port of one computer to the other each time I power down one computer and power up the other for use.

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✔ Best Answer
August 18, 2014 at 12:21:35
If it were me, I'd buy the second cable. Label both ends of it (with an indelible marker maybe) so you can tell it apart from the other computer's cable and then plug it into the second computer and run it to the router. Then, when you want that computer plugged in, just unplug computer one at the router and plug 2 in. Reverse when you want 1 plugged in.

Alternatively, spend the $20, get a small 4 or 5 port switch, plug it into the router and plug both computers 1 and 2 into the switch.

I'd go with the switch.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
August 18, 2014 at 10:36:21
What do you mean by a "LAN cable splitter"?

Can you provide a link to the device you're referring to?

What is your current network setup?


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#2
August 18, 2014 at 11:45:34
Why bother with a splitter. Just purchase another length of cable and plug it in.

That is assuming you have more than one Ethernet port on your router. If you don't it is probably not a router.

Stuart


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#3
August 18, 2014 at 11:50:19
The only link I could find for it is: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Gigaware-LA...

I want to use the male end of this splitter to connect to the Ethernet (out) port on my AT&T residential gateway router and attach one (each) Cat5 cable to each of the two female ports of the splitter and the other end of each Cat5 cable to the Ethernet (in) port of two different computers with a Windows XP OS but I do not intend to ever power up and use both computers at the same time. I would completely power down one computer before I power up the other for use. Again, this is to avoid having to switch a single Cat5 cable from one computer to the other each time I want to use a different computer. Would this work as described?


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Related Solutions

#4
August 18, 2014 at 11:53:15
That makes all the sense in the world and it does have multiple ports Stuart but I have used them all and there are no empty ports left. I apologize that I did not cover that on my previous post.

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#5
August 18, 2014 at 12:21:35
✔ Best Answer
If it were me, I'd buy the second cable. Label both ends of it (with an indelible marker maybe) so you can tell it apart from the other computer's cable and then plug it into the second computer and run it to the router. Then, when you want that computer plugged in, just unplug computer one at the router and plug 2 in. Reverse when you want 1 plugged in.

Alternatively, spend the $20, get a small 4 or 5 port switch, plug it into the router and plug both computers 1 and 2 into the switch.

I'd go with the switch.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
August 18, 2014 at 12:22:18
Don't waste your money on any type of solution that uses that type on an adapter.

For the same amount of money you can get a small switch to give you the additional needed connections.


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#7
August 18, 2014 at 12:58:43
Yes, I would go for the switch in these circumstances, it is what switches were designed for.

What you are planning would probably work but continually plugging and unplugging a RJ45 plug with eventually lead to failures, They were not designed for that kind of use,

Stuart


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#8
August 18, 2014 at 15:28:26
Thanks everyone. I really appreciate your advice.

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