Solved How to make an old computer WiFi ready

July 6, 2019 at 13:59:42
Specs: Windows 10 Home, Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-860 quad-core processor, 6GB DDR3-1333MHz SDRAM
I occasionally still use my old HP Windows 7 tower computer and I would like to connect it to the Internet (I have Xfinity as service provider now).
I have a few questions:
If I use a cable to physically connect the computer to the router, should I need anything else? Or, after I connect the cable, I will have the Internet service?
If I wish to connect wireless, do I need to buy any equipment to make my computer WiFi ready and, if so, what I need to do after installing the additional equipment?
I have uploaded a general spec. of my computer and a snapshot of the Control Panel screen that I get when I try to connect wireless. Following is the link:
http://www.fileconvoy.com/dfl.php?i...
Thanks

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#1
July 6, 2019 at 14:10:14
Connecting via an ethernet (a cat-5) cable to the router ought to give you internet access; providing your service and router are setup correctly, and on-board ethernet card is setup correctly too.

Your tower needs an add-in wifi card, or you use a usb wifi adapter; as the tower has no wifi built in - based on the i fo you up,oaded.

message edited by trvlr


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#2
July 6, 2019 at 15:39:52
✔ Best Answer
If it's been a while since the machine has been on the internet, make sure when you first connect to download all security (OS/virus/malware/spyware) updates before proceeding any further.

"If I use a cable to physically connect the computer to the router, should I need anything else? Or, after I connect the cable, I will have the Internet service?"

Unless your internet provider requires some special software to connect (rare), then theoretically you should be good to go.

"If I wish to connect wireless, do I need to buy any equipment to make my computer WiFi ready and, if so, what I need to do after installing the additional equipment?"

Simplest way (as trvlr mentioned) would be a USB WiFi adapter (assuming your provider issued you a WiFi modem or you've purchased one separately). Make sure it supports Win7 (most do). Here's some samples:

https://www.newegg.com/d-link-dwa-1...
https://www.amazon.com/Adapter-1200...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#3
July 6, 2019 at 16:43:24
"If I wish to connect wireless"
Another point Charles, wireless is slower than cable, I don't use it on my tower comps.

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#4
July 6, 2019 at 18:37:11
The computer is located in a room different from the one where the router is. I envision using sometimes the cable and sometimes the WiFi connection, depending on what I am doing with the computer and on whether the cable gets too much 'in the way'. In any case I have a fast Internet service, reasonably good even using WiFi.

This bring up another question: when I use the cable, should I turn off the WiFi connection or it will turn off by itself?

Thanks


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#5
July 6, 2019 at 18:48:29
"This bring up another question: when I use the cable, should I turn off the WiFi connection or it will turn off by itself?"
You will have to try yourself, some keyboards also have a button.

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#6
July 7, 2019 at 16:24:42
I found an Ethernet cable long enough to connect my computer to the router and I have now Internet connection. It works just fine. I have also ordered a wifi adapter, that I will use as an alternate to the Ethernet cable.
Thanks to All for the good advice.

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#7
July 8, 2019 at 05:04:37
Another point Charles, wireless is slower than cable, I don't use it on my tower comps.

Wireless is inherently susceptible to lag and latency that you won't get with a wired connection. Therefore, wired will give you better performance. It won't necessarily be "faster" Which is to say, 1000 Mbps wired is more or less the same as 1000 Mbps wireless. The only difference being the lag and latency.

When we're talking about networking we measure in "bandwidth" which is not a measure of 'speed' but is instead a measure of how much data can flow past any one spot in a network in one second. 100 Mbps is ten times the amount of data of 10 Mbps. 1000 Mbps is 10 times the amount of data 100 Mbps can carry. They're not 10 times faster. The data travels over the medium at the same 'speed' regardless. My favorite analogy. You have a 1/2 inch water pipe. The water flows through this pipe at a specific rate that can't be changed. You make the pipe ten times the diameter. With the water still flowing at the same rate, you can now put ten times the amount of water through said pipe.

So, if you're planning on gaming, don't connect to your router wirelessly. Connect with a cable. If you're not a gamer, don't worry about it. Wireless should suit your needs just fine.

As to running both at the same time, Windows tends to lose it's marbles if you have two network interfaces connected at the same time. When presented with two different default gateway IP's, Windows tends to stop working. So go into your network connections and disable the which ever one you're not using at any given time and you'll be ok.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


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#8
July 8, 2019 at 05:17:42
Also consider using the homeplug system to provide an ethernet connection in "any" room These devices use the house wiring as network and provide a secure and faster connection than wifi.

Connect one adapter (plugged into a nearby mains outlet) to the router via ethernet; plug another into a convenient mains outlet where you want ethernet connection - and connect that to whichever computer or other device using ethernet connection.

Most brands now offer wifi adapter (a repeater in effect) using the house wiring to provide the signal from the router; again more stable than simply using wifi between a wifi extender and the router.

Many of these homeplug wifi modules also include at least one ethernet port - some two or more.

Devolo in Europe were one of the first in this technology and for me are the first port of call. (Thy're simply the best - cue Tina...!)

In Canada/USA Devolo aren't available but Netgear, D-link, Cisco-Linksys and Belkin offer similar. Which is best of those - who knows ?(Only "The Shadows knows"...)

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#9
July 8, 2019 at 13:25:50
Curt, trvlr,
Thanks for the clarifications and the additional information provided!

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