Solved how to make a d-link dsl-2640r into a wireless hub

August 6, 2013 at 08:35:19
Specs: Windows 7
I have btinternet in the house but want to connect the d-link dsl-2640r to boost the wireless signal in area of the house that the bt hub does not reach. as such want to connect the d-link via ethernet cable and use a wireless hub to connect to bthub.

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#1
August 6, 2013 at 08:41:56
✔ Best Answer
So you want to do this:

BTInternet (Assuming this is a wireless cable router) -> cable run to DLink (1 of the 4 Ethernet ports) -> wireless in garage

That should work. I would suggest turning off DHCP in the DLink as long as whatever BTInternet provided you supports DHCP and has the ports to run the ethernet cable to. what did BTInternet provide you for equipment? Do you have any other routers?

To make your DLINK into a wireless hub.. Disable DHCP, plug your cable into one of the four ethernet ports, and configure the wireless settings (SSID, Security, etc). It will allow for wireless connectivity, but act as a bridge between your BTInternet device and your wireless clients connected to the dlink.

www.standby-it.com

message edited by jpag3074


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#2
August 6, 2013 at 09:11:31
Temporary connect the d-link to one of your computers vie Ethernet cable.

Log onto the Dlink management interface and configure the wi-fi according to the manual. using a different SSID than the BTHub.

Give the D-link an IP address outside of the DHCP scope of the BTHub and disable DHCP on the D link Assuming that the BT Hub is still set to its default IP addresses that will be something like 192.168.1.xx, xx being a number less than 64 and greater then 237. BT uses a default DHCP scope from 64-237 and a hub address of 192.168.1.254

Once that is done reconnect the Ethernet cable to one of the LAN ports on the BT Hub. Reboot everything and you should be good to go.

Stuart


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#3
August 6, 2013 at 14:52:57
For clear concise instructions on how to do this simply click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN

You'll want to pay attention to the scenario wherein you interconnect the two routers "LAN port to LAN port" and are keeping them in the same subnet.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#4
August 7, 2013 at 01:13:31
Thanks everyone for you help seems removing the DCHP has done the trick. 1 thing that does seem to be a problem is adding Apple products to the D-link hub, is this because they need DCHP to connect?

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#5
August 7, 2013 at 05:01:38
Depends on ho they are configured if they need DHCP. Any device connecting to the-net net work through the D-link needing a DHCP address will get it from the BT Home hub. If other devices will connect then DHCP is not the problem.

Having two devices on the netwrok issuing DHCP addresses will cause confusion and nothing will connect correctly

Stuart


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#6
August 7, 2013 at 12:38:15
If you've configured your d-link router correctly, anybody connecting to it (both wired and/or wirelessly) will still get TCP/IP settings from the DHCP enabled router.

In my limited experience with Apple products I've found they often don't play well with other manufacturer's wireless equipment (Apple would much prefer you spend more $$$ on their wireless routers than on another brand). So it may be a case of just an interoperability issue. To test, you can try connecting any other DHCP enabled device to the d-link router (it's not a hub). If it's successful, then it's not a DHCP issue and more likely an "Apple" issue.

FWIW, I have two Linksys routers in my house and both my wife's iPhones and her iPad connect to them quite well. But we have had issues at work with Apple products not wanting to connect wirelessly to Linksys and one other brand of wireless equipment (not d-link).

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
August 7, 2013 at 12:56:50
Any device that connects onto that wireless network is going to need DHCP if you dont assign it static. As long as the BT has DHCP on it, and your plugged in "lan to lan", the client should pull its DHCP address from BT device through the dlink, unless BT DHCP been limited to a certain number of devices. If your other wireless clients are connecting to dlink (non apple products) and connecting properly, then its likely not a DHCP issue (unless you are out of addresses).

Have an iphone, ipad, and other android / windows devices.. Most AP's I dont have issues gaining access to the network for access from any of these devices. There are some cloud-based WAP's that do have issues with apple products, although I do believe they were resolved in late 2012. Not a big fan of airports here either, unless its an all MAC infrastructure for time machine, etc. (YEA, right :) )

www.standby-it.com


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#8
August 7, 2013 at 16:31:53
Just for information the BT Hub that the OP refers to is in fact a full blown ADSL wireless router with DHCP and everything else you would expect on a router. British Telecom call it a BT Home Hub just to confuse the issue.

Stuart


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#9
August 8, 2013 at 07:58:31
British Telecom call it a BT Home Hub just to confuse the issue.

LOL

Without googling the device, I had a feeling it was a typical SOHO router. Perhaps they (British Telecom) are using the word "hub" in a different fashion than we do in the networking world but the simple truth is, switches have replaced hub's and nobody uses a hub any more. Calling it a hub is incorrect terminology on their part.

My wife always tells me to stop splitting hairs but I can't help it. Calling a router a hub is just plain wrong! You wouldn't call a car a motorcycle after all......LOL

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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