how do wireless laptops on 2nd router access

January 14, 2011 at 13:01:10
Specs: Windows XP, PIV
how do wireless laptops on 2nd router on LAN access shared devices on wired computer on first router (one network)

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#1
January 14, 2011 at 13:23:58
Please rewrite this with some punctuation. I have now idea what you are asking.

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#2
January 14, 2011 at 13:33:09
They don't unless you config per this diagram

http://kb.netgear.com/app/answers/d...

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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#3
January 15, 2011 at 04:30:08
Hi All, i'm refering to the article below (Add a second Router to your LAN)
1. Will wireless laptop on the downstream routers (router 2, 3, e.t.c) be able to access shared folder and printer on a wired computer connected to the the upstream (internet) router1?

2. Do i have to use the same broadcast SSID on all the routers?


Add a second Router to your LAN

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By: Curt R
August 28, 2009

We have many requests in the Network Forum on how to properly add a second (or third) router to an existing LAN that already has a SOHO router connected to the internet. I'm going to write out a brief guide so the next time it comes up, I can just post a link to this instead of typing it all out again!

The general setup of SOHO Router's is similar. While some use a different subnet, every one I've worked with uses a Class C Private IP Addressing Scheme. I'm going to use the basic Class C private for this tutorial (192.168.0.0)

I'm going to give two setup guides:

Version 1 will be for a simple, single subnet setup

Version 2 will be cover separate subnets

The term “Router1” will refer to the router connected to the internet. Any others (ie: Router2, Router3) will be downstream of Router1

Version 1:
========

When connecting a second router to an existing LAN it’s easiest to connect LAN port to LAN port and configure the LAN side of the downstream router as compared to connecting to the WAN side.

Router1 (LAN Side):

IP: 192.168.0.1

SM: 255.255.255.0

DHCP Enabled = Yes

DHCP Scope: 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199

Router2 (LAN Side):

IP: 192.168.0.2

SM: 255.255.255.0

Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1

DHCP Enabled = No

You will note in the above configuration that the LAN IP of Router2 is within the same subnet as Router1 but is outside of the DHCP Scope defined on Router1. This is important. If you use an IP within the scope, the DHCP service may attempt to give that IP to another computer you plug into your network. Using an IP outside of the scope avoids this potential problem. Also, devices like Routers, Servers, network printers should always have a statically assigned IP address so that the IP never changes.

If you have everything configured correctly, any computer plugged into Router2 will get an IP from the DHCP service on Router1 and will have full LAN and internet connectivity.

The DHCP Scope’s Default Gateway IP address should point at Router1 (192.168.0.1) as it is the gateway to the internet.

If you need to add another router, or two or three, simply set the LAN IP on Router3 to 192.168.0.3 and configure all other TCP/IP settings the same as Router2. Do the same for any others you may add.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 18, 2011 at 07:18:57
1. Will wireless laptop on the downstream routers (router 2, 3, e.t.c) be able to access shared folder and printer on a wired computer connected to the the upstream (internet) router1?

Yes, if they're all configured for the same subnet using the LAN port to LAN port connection scenario.

2. Do i have to use the same broadcast SSID on all the routers?

If you want them to all have the same WLAN, yes.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
January 18, 2011 at 11:48:05
hi all,
pls how can i get where to input the gateway IP for linksys wrt160n router to act as a second router (access point) on a network. I will really appreciate it if someone can take a look at the wrt160n and write out the steps in configuring a wrt160n as an access point for a single LAN.

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#6
January 18, 2011 at 13:44:04
The router's manual (or setup guide) will tell you the IP address to use to connect to the router's management interface.

Once you know that IP, plug a computer into a LAN port on the router and ensure it's on. Open a web browser and connect to the IP specified in the manual/guide. Once there, you can adjust/change any settings you need to.

NOTE: If you change the LAN IP of the router, you need to make note of it's new IP as that will be the IP you use in the future to connect to it's management interface.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
January 19, 2011 at 00:00:25
Hi Curt R,
I was able to do all the things you mention above. The only problem is that there is no where to specify gateway IP under the LAN section i.e. there is no provision for gateway under the LAN setting for the wrt160n. Pls, can u have a look at it for me. Pleeaase. Regards.


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#8
January 19, 2011 at 07:24:34
When you're connecting more router's to an existing network, and keeping them in the same subnet, a default gateway address is not required.

DHCP should only be enabled on the primary router (the one connected to the internet) and all subsequent (downstream) router's should be configured with an IP in the same subnet and the same subnet mask with DHCP disabled.

DHCP will give out the LAN IP of it's router (the primary) as part of the TCP/IP settings to clients.

Example:

Router 1 (primary router with internet connection)
IP: 192.168.0.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

DHCP Enabled = Yes
DHCP Settings: (what the clients get)
Scope: 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
DNS: 192.168.0.1
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1

Router 2:
IP: 192.168.0.2
SM: 255.255.255.0

DHCP Enabled = No

Router 3:
IP: 192.168.0.3
SM: 255.255.255.0

DHCP Enabled = No

DHCP clients who plug into any router (1, 2, or 33) will get their TCP/IP settings from the DHCP server on router 1 and will be able to communicate with any other client in the network regardless of which router it's plugged into. Also, all clients will get internet connectivity.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
January 23, 2011 at 09:01:40
Dear Curt R,
Will the above settings also allow wireless computers on the second router to access shared folders and printers on first router. tanx

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#10
January 24, 2011 at 07:20:28
Yes.

Since all routers have LAN IP's in the same subnet as the 1st router (the one connected to the internet) and since router 1 is also the one giving out the DHCP information to all clients, both wired and wireless, then all will have internet access as well as full LAN access.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#11
January 24, 2011 at 11:36:10
thank curt r,

i will try these out and give you a feedback.

Regards.


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