Solved How can I test my wifi speeds, NOT my internet speed

August 6, 2014 at 09:17:01
Specs: Windows 8.1, 8
How can I test my wifi speeds, NOT my interent speed. I know I need two endpoints, But I just cant find a good program that will do that with an easy interface. I see a lot of network anaylzers but none of them are helping me show my speed from my device to router to device.

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#1
August 6, 2014 at 12:22:52
Ok, first off, you're talking about bandwidth here, not "speed" The two are not the same thing. Your media's "speed" is constant, bandwidth on each media type varies. If you're interested, google "define bandwidth" and do a little reading for a clearer understanding of the correct terminology.

If you want to test your bandwidth connect two wireless clients to your wireless network and transfer a large file (min 1 Gig) between the two.

If you open your Task Manager (ctrl-alt-del >> select Task Manager) and click on the Networking tab, it will tell you what bandwidth you're getting while the transfer is in progress.

You don't actually need any additional software or tools.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


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#2
August 6, 2014 at 13:19:48
Forgive me for calling it speed, Yes Bandwidth. I know there are tools out there to measure this however. And if i were to just use to laptops lets say, you are referring to connecting them up on the shared network and then just transfer them. And that will give me my speed.

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#3
August 6, 2014 at 14:29:49
✔ Best Answer
Yes, transferring data between two devices on the same network is a good way of checking bandwidth.

I see you're using windows 8. I haven't touched it myself but I'm willing to bet it has the "Network" tab on the Task Manager like most previous versions of Windows. If it does, you open it and then initiate the transfer.

You can watch real time while the transfer is happening and it will tell you what percentage of your available bandwidth is being used and give you a nice graph to show you as well.

If you have (for example) 100 Mbps of available bandwidth and you use 70 percent, you know you're getting about 70 Mbps of bandwidth.

Don't forget, when dealing with bandwidth, you'll never utilize the full amount available to you as a certain percentage (around 10 to 15% in my experience) is used up in overhead. So if you're only getting 70 to 85% of your advertised bandwidth, that's actually spot on.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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