How can I make an HDD into a Network Drive

November 16, 2010 at 09:15:38
Specs: Windows Vista
Using Small Business Server 2003, I can see that one drive [T:] on the server is under 'network drives', which shows up on all connected clients, which is great. There are also a couple drives, or partitions, on the server under 'hard drive discs'.

I would like to know how to make another one of the drives [D:], on the server, a network drive, basically also showing up on our network of pcs and laptops.


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#1
November 16, 2010 at 09:41:41
Sharing is how you present a folder or a drive as available on the network.

Highly recommend you do not share the OS drive.

Might want to get a book on maintaining servers so you have a clear understanding of share rights and file permissions.

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#2
November 16, 2010 at 09:50:51
Thanks wanderer - yes this is def not OS drive - so I am told by the boss.

If you mean under 'shares (local)', on the server, all the non network drives, and some folders are listed here, such as [D$].
But I cannot see T drive, in this list, which is the only drive currently shared on the network.


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#3
November 16, 2010 at 09:59:37
You view drives in Disk Management not just My Computer. Drive letters are different when local vs being remote.

For example you can have a d: drive local to the server but a user will have T: mapped to that shared drive.

Before you start changing things you really need to review all of this in a book. It can get complicated. And you don't want to be compromising the security of the server.

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#4
November 16, 2010 at 10:14:28
Thanks again -checked out disc management, and again the T: drive isn't there, yet all other ones show up. There is also one 157mb unnamed drive, but I suspect this is normal. This is a lot smaller then T.

Unfortunately we don't have a manual at the moment, and I've taken on this responsibility. But if there isn't any other info on this on the net, then yea we can wait for a manual. Still hoping we can find a way though.


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#5
November 16, 2010 at 10:39:59
Of course t: isn't there. This is the difference between a remote view and a local view.

Here is a course overview of what you need to learn

How to create a share
How a share is seen on the network
What you should and should not share
Share permissions
How to map a drive
Why you map a drive to a share
How to troubleshoot share access

You might want to set yourself up a two xp machine lab and learn to create and how to access shares.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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#6
November 16, 2010 at 11:05:23
Thanks for the overview, it is much appreciated, wanderer.

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