Help with Home Network setup Wired &Wireless

August 8, 2010 at 12:05:16
Specs: Windows XP
Hello:

I am looking at setting up my home network myself, and I'm wondering exactly what I need for a successful network that will satisfy my needs now and for the next 5-10 years or so. If this is too complex and I should hire someone, please let me know.

Ideally I would like to have multiple wired and wireless access points in my home. From the first floor, where the cable modem is located in my utility room, I am able to run multiple wires to my second floor and one to my third with ease.

On my first floor I have a home office with multiple connections and a wireless access point is needed. There will be two computers, a network printer, a network LCD screen.

On my second floor I have multiple wired connections, and an available network wall plug that I would also like to connect for future use. The devices with wired connections are my television, and gaming devices. I'm thinking to leaving some expansion room for whatever else in the entertainment realm that may require internet connections in the future, so maybe a router, switch, or hub is required?

Finally on the third floor I am able to get one wired connection up there, and I'd like to make that a wireless access point as well as the first floor wireless can be a little slow. There may be multiple devices to connect in the future, such as a TV, gaming system, or computer.

Help is greatly appreciated. I have enough Cat 5E wire to do it all myself, but I am unsure of what components to utilize.


See More: Help with Home Network setup Wired &Wireless

Report •


#1
August 8, 2010 at 18:20:53
The network is as follows: Modem > router > switch > all devices. It doesn't matter if they are wired or wireless & it doesn't matter where they are located.

I prefer all wired, if possible. If you have the modem & router on the first floor, you can run up to 4 cables for wired connections to wherever you want. If you want more than 4 wired connections, add a switch. Other than that, wireless should reach at least 2 floors above the main.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#2
August 8, 2010 at 19:41:53
Hi guapo:

Thanks for your advice.

I agree I prefer wired as well, but so many products are wireless only, and having a decent wireless network helps.

After reading your advice, I guess I can't have two wireless routers? I have tried two different reputable brands of wireless router and both dud not reach my third floor well.


Report •

#3
August 9, 2010 at 06:13:20
Sometimes if you move the router just a few feet, it's makes all the difference in the world. My router is in the cellar on a shelf bolted to the joists. In other words, it's on the ceiling. My brother gets a signal on the top floor.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 9, 2010 at 08:13:18
On my first floor I have a home office with multiple connections and a wireless access point is needed.

If you haven't already bought equipment and are just in the planning stages, I would go with a wireless router instead of an AP.

Think about it, you can get a wireless capable SOHO router for pretty much the same prices as a SOHO router that isn't wireless capable. A wireless AP (access point) is going to cost you the same, or more as the router. So, save $$$, buy a wireless SOHO Router.

Finally on the third floor I am able to get one wired connection up there, and I'd like to make that a wireless access point as well as the first floor wireless can be a little slow.

Again, I'd buy a wireless SOHO Router. Make sure in both cases you get one with 4 LAN ports. This way, you can also plug in wired clients on the 3'd floor.

After reading your advice, I guess I can't have two wireless routers? I have tried two different reputable brands of wireless router and both dud not reach my third floor well.

You can have two wireless routers, you just have to configure them correctly.

1) They should be on the same WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network).

2) They should be on different channels.

Example:

Router 1:
SSID: My_WLAN
Encryption: WPA2 with complex password
Channel: 1

Router 2:
SSID: My_WLAN
Encryption: same as router 1 (password too)
Channel: 11

You'll want router 2 connected to router 1 so they can share DHCP (You'll disable it on router 2) and share the internet and LAN. Click on my name above in my response and read my "how-to" guide on "adding a second router". You'll want to use the "LAN port to LAN port" scenario

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#5
August 9, 2010 at 15:19:30
Thanks guapo and Curt R very much. You guys rock. I am currently away on business but I will let you know how my project goes when I get back to do it.

Report •


Ask Question