Solved Help selecting wireless router

May 23, 2013 at 05:26:35
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate, Core i5 3rd Gen 2.501 Ghz / 4GB
I want to purchase a wireless router for a wired connection at my home so that i can make us of it with other 2-4 devices but now i'm confused with the two below.

Netgear WNR612
http://www.flipkart.com/netgear-wir...


TP-LINK TL-WR720N
http://www.flipkart.com/tp-link-tl-...

Please help me selecting the best amoung this two.

1. I have 4 devices at home so if both the above routers can connect upto 4 devices?
2. Which one has more signal strength

I live in a house with two floors & each floor has two rooms.

Thanks


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✔ Best Answer
May 23, 2013 at 10:21:44
Neither of the devices you posted links for will be as good as a dual radio router like I suggested.

The ones you listed have only one radio and operate at 2.4 GHz. Most of the newer wireless equipment, like smartphones and pads, can operate at 5.0 GHz so it makes sense to get a router capable of both so legacy (2.4) equipment as well as modern (5.0) can all connect to your wireless network.

If this is for your home, 5.0 GHz will give you better coverage than 2.4 GHz with regard to coverage inside your house. No matter what you get, you'll want it centrally located within your house.

You definitely want to use WPA2 encryption and a strong encryption key. It's nice that you think nobody will use your wireless for their nefarious purposes but you're naïve to think that. Google the term "war driving" and read up on it and you'll see why we're recommending you use the highest level of encryption and a strong key.

No offense taken but you appear to not be listening and I hate repeating myself so I'm done with this conversation after this post.

To sum up:

- You want to buy a dual radio (dual band - 2.4/5.0 GHz) router
- You want to use the highest level of encryption possible and a strong encryption on your wireless network
- centrally locate your wireless router in your home to provide maximum signal throughout your home
- read the reviews on each device you look up and pick one that has consistently good reviews
- do not buy obscure brands....stick with known brand names

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
May 23, 2013 at 07:10:58
I wouldn't buy either one to be honest.

If you're planning on running a wireless network in your home at any point in the future, and I would plan on it, then you'll want a SOHO Router that's dual radio. Which is to say, it operates on both the 2.4 MHz and 5.0 MHz bands.

You will want wireless N and 4 LAN ports as well since you have 4 wired devices.

Since all SOHO level equipment is essentially the same from the average users point of view, you don't need the most expensive one on the market. Shop around, compare prices and choose one of the more common brand names.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
May 23, 2013 at 07:21:05
By 4 decives i mean 1 laptop & 3 Android device & all of them with wifi
Not 4 wired devices

I just have a single wired internet connection provided by my ISP which i want to convert to wireless so as i can use it on multiple devices wirelessly.

I think a single wifi can connect to atleast 4 devices isn't it?

However i dont know do wifi routers have limit of connecting decices to it?


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#3
May 23, 2013 at 08:51:07
In a typical domestic environment (and most small offices too) you're hardly likely to approach anywhere near a limit to connections allowed (if indeed there is one)... Remember that the more devices that can access it at the same time... means they are all sharing the bandwidth (both ways); which means things might get a little slow at times?

As CurtR advises these days most SOHO (small office/home office) routers are much of a muchness (very similar to one another). However it pays to look for reviews on whichever models you may consider... A Google search for "best wifi router" or "wifi router reviews" might be a starting point; and reviews from purchasers on Amazon is often a good source too...

Netgear, D-Link, are two that come to mind; and some folks like LinkSys (now part of Cisco I think?), although I have come across some adverse reviews for all three in the not so recent past (but then that happens for most kit at times?). If they're still about then Alcatel/Thompson Speedtouch are alright too (at least from my own and a few other's experience).

Whichever one you opt for.. ensure you employ some serious security measures too. Typically restrict access to only those MAC addresses (device's wifi adapter address in layman's terms...) you have entered in a list within the wifi router's security section. That is a minimum. Ideally employ an encrypted access key of some sort too and that will seriously restrict unauthorised access. I use both measures. If you browse to this recent post you will see a recent discussion re' wifi router security...

http://www.computing.net/answers/ne...

Most (all these days?) SOHO routers allow both wifi and cat-5/ethernet connections; and there are times when the cat-5 is preferable. It's certainly more stable and less hackable (as in it's not so easy for unauthorised users to log onto (connect to) your router and dsl service - which isn't always the case with wifi... Both approaches benefit from active firewalls of course...


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#4
May 23, 2013 at 09:12:04
I will use both the things for encryption & also it will be used at my home not for office even people around are not that computer freak to hack into some ones wifi.

I'm just worried about the wifi signal range
Which one will provide the best from above two?

I also want to know if any of the router is ADSL as my ISP says it cannot be configured with my current wired connection

I have a very tight budget, gonna pay from my pocket money.
I'm just a student

No offence & thanks to all those who replyed but em still not clear to
My question which one will do a good job for me as i dont want to stick at a single place in my home with my wired connection?


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#5
May 23, 2013 at 10:21:44
✔ Best Answer
Neither of the devices you posted links for will be as good as a dual radio router like I suggested.

The ones you listed have only one radio and operate at 2.4 GHz. Most of the newer wireless equipment, like smartphones and pads, can operate at 5.0 GHz so it makes sense to get a router capable of both so legacy (2.4) equipment as well as modern (5.0) can all connect to your wireless network.

If this is for your home, 5.0 GHz will give you better coverage than 2.4 GHz with regard to coverage inside your house. No matter what you get, you'll want it centrally located within your house.

You definitely want to use WPA2 encryption and a strong encryption key. It's nice that you think nobody will use your wireless for their nefarious purposes but you're naïve to think that. Google the term "war driving" and read up on it and you'll see why we're recommending you use the highest level of encryption and a strong key.

No offense taken but you appear to not be listening and I hate repeating myself so I'm done with this conversation after this post.

To sum up:

- You want to buy a dual radio (dual band - 2.4/5.0 GHz) router
- You want to use the highest level of encryption possible and a strong encryption on your wireless network
- centrally locate your wireless router in your home to provide maximum signal throughout your home
- read the reviews on each device you look up and pick one that has consistently good reviews
- do not buy obscure brands....stick with known brand names

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
May 23, 2013 at 15:39:22
Nicely put CurtR...

If money is serious issue here... then at the least opt for a better known make (typically one of those I've already mentioned - as they generally have reasonable track record and are well known) - even if single (lower-band) only? But if lower-band will not allow your assorted (new, current etc.) androids etc. to connect to it (or will they connect to lower band router - I would have thought so...) then you would be obliged to go for the higher?

But again really and seriously read, and listen to CurtR's advice here... and see if you can go dual-band; or least a brand well known etc. to be reliable/OK even in only lower-band (or upper band?) only...

You need to be sure that whichever one you opt for - all your kit can/will be able to connect to it via wifi...

Have to say I wouldn't have considered the dual-band approach; but then I'm not that into all the latest gadgets as was... So CurtR's last post here was equally informative for me too...

Incidentally of the two you refer to - one is Netgear. Some of their kit is fine - and I have experience with Netgear routers in both domestic and professional/broadcast environs - with no problem. Netgear have had some less than nice reports at times; and more than than a few good reports too. SKY in the UK issued rebranded/tweaked Netgear routers to their subscribers; the first round was "mmm!!!" and the second said to be a little better... Currently they have the Netgear (second issue), another (not Netgear - can't remember which it is just now) in service; and another make (possibly SKY designed(?) by now be out there too - after trials etc. via the staff - that is about par at least, if not better, with the Netgear... The TP-link is unknown to me; the brand similarly. Although I think they have recently arrived on the scene (at least in the UK) with kit aimed at networking over mains systems etc.?

Of the two I'd likely go for the Netgear (not knowing anything about the TP-link); but only after checking for reviews etc. about it, and other similar Netgear kit. Check reviews for the TP-link too and see which seems to get the best reviews overall - reliability of service (connection/speed) and life (how long it will hopefully work before it dies or goes faulty...); and also tech support/service etc.? In truth I think most of the routers out there do not score overly high/well when it comes to after-sales service/support; but then again I may be wrong in that last aspect?


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#7
May 23, 2013 at 19:20:22
Thank you both of you.

Now i will be looking on the dual band router & will post the link to verify with you guys.


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