Solved help, is someone hacking into my router

September 6, 2012 at 08:19:24
Specs: Windows 7, 4gb
please help. i am connected to my home windows 7 desktop pc by teamviewer from another network so internet is working ok but the computer was acting weird so i tried to load google and it wouldn't load google or yahoo. i logged into my dd-wrt router and i have two unknown devices showing up and then disappearing under active clients that are never there. any ideas why these two are there and it seems weird that these two show up and now i cannot connect to any http websites. i also cant connect to check for updates for say malwarebytes. am i being hacked?

here is the info for those two devices showing up
* 169.254.5.105 14:D4:FE:6F:2C:1F


* 169.254.235.224 00:19:DF:78:03:00


See More: help, is someone hacking into my router

Report •


✔ Best Answer
September 7, 2012 at 13:05:20
Yeah, it's a common issue for SOHO level routers to "lose their marbles" from time to time. Usually recycling the power on them does the trick unless the unit is actually failing.

If yours keeps losing it's marbles with increasing frequency over time that's usually a pretty sure sign it's dieing and needs to be replaced.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
September 6, 2012 at 10:45:39
Those are APIPA addresses.

This doesn't necessarily mean you're being hacked though. There could be a lot of reasons why those are showing up.

Here's a couple basic security things you should know and do:
1) If you have a wireless router, disable the ability to manage the router from the wireless network
2) Always encrypt your wireless network with WPA encryption and a complex password
3) Disable remote management of the router.

As to what those addresses are, there's no way for anybody to say without being at your desk and logged into the mangament interface on the router. I suspect someone is trying to connect to your wireless network. It could be as simple as a iPad or smartphone in the house that you've forgotten about or it could be someone with a laptop outside your home (like a neighbor) trying to connect to your network.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#2
September 7, 2012 at 04:50:05
Always disable WPS as well and use WPA2 encryption.

You could check all your networked devices MAC address and see if the two you listed are not from one you own.

Tony


Report •

#3
September 7, 2012 at 05:15:28
i confirmed those were not my mac ids. router was acting really weird after a few reboots and wouldn't allow anything on the wan port so i reset it and installed a backup from two weeks ago and everything seems fine now. knock on wood i hope it was just the router going crazy but i will monitor this weekend.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 7, 2012 at 13:05:20
✔ Best Answer
Yeah, it's a common issue for SOHO level routers to "lose their marbles" from time to time. Usually recycling the power on them does the trick unless the unit is actually failing.

If yours keeps losing it's marbles with increasing frequency over time that's usually a pretty sure sign it's dieing and needs to be replaced.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

Ask Question