Getting wifi into metal building (shed)

July 1, 2015 at 12:43:53
Specs: Internet
I currently have wifi in my house, but I would like to get the connection into a metal building that is around 40 feet from my router. The plan for the metal building is to use it as a man cave. Therefore the internet speeds would have to be adequate for gaming and streaming movies. There is a window on the metal building that faces towards the house. My original idea was to put a wireless repeater in the window and transmit it into the building that way. However I've heard that using a wireless repeater will greatly decrease the Internet speeds, so it's possible that it wouldn't be fast enough to stream or game. What is the easiest and best way to get the Internet into the metal building?

See More: Getting wifi into metal building (shed)

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#1
July 1, 2015 at 12:46:21
If it's on the same mains circuit use powerline adaptors.

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#2
July 1, 2015 at 12:55:17
I'm not very smart when it comes to this stuff. Could you please explain how the powerline adapters are used? Would I still be able to stream music from my phone that way also?

EDIT: I'm actually not sure if it's on the same lines or not. I know that the house a breaker box and the building has a separate breaker box. Does that indicate if they are on the same line or not?

message edited by Ajoyner41


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#3
July 1, 2015 at 13:48:52
What about running a network cable (underground?) between the house & the building, would that be an option?

message edited by riider


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Related Solutions

#4
July 1, 2015 at 13:52:29
possibly. How would I go about that? Connect one end of the cable to the router inside my house then set a second router up In the building?

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#5
July 1, 2015 at 14:03:33
"Connect one end of the cable to the router inside my house then set a second router up In the building?"

Yup.


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#6
July 1, 2015 at 14:06:40
Is it as simple as just connecting it and running the cables or do I need to set up the routers a specific way?

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#7
July 1, 2015 at 14:44:46
power line adapter - aka "lan over mains" - or homeplugs - are more or less out of the box to use. The current standard is also known as Homeplug; and allegedly current models from various manufacturers are compatible with each other. I have no personal experience with mixing makes/models.

You plug one into a convenient mains socket adjacent to the router. connect it to the router with a cat-5/ethernet cabler. Plug a similar adapter into a convenient adapter in the "shed". Connect your computer there to that adapter with a cat-5 cable - and you done.

Cat-5/ethernet is inherently more stable and fast than wifi in terms of local la; and you're only limitation re on-line games is the speed of your broadband service.

Devolo (in Germany) werre the first with the technology; and for my money still the best.But they're only available in the UK and Europe. So in USA/Canada etc. you have t look to other brands. Netgear, Linksys, and TP-link are three that come to mind. TP-link occasionally seem to have problems (for some users at least).

Many of the current brands also offer a module/adapter that when plugged into your lan over mains system allow a wifi connection via that particular module. So you can have both wifi and cat-5 available.

This article:

http://tinyurl.com/njzsmb8

may be a useful read? Note it is a UK based article so naturally if you're not in the UK (or that place just of the east coast) then you need to research in your area for similar/ kit?

lan over mains is simply connect a cat-5 cable between the router and the "local" module; and another at the remote position to your computer - and that's it.

Depending on how you go for wifi extender routine - depends on the other steps that "may" be required; and even then it's not complicated. Some of the wifi via homeplugs are simply (allegedly) plug and go...? Using a wifi extender (as per one of the Netgear such items - which is in effect another router) does require a little setup. The "extender/router" is plugged into the homeplug and then configured to act as an extender from the master/main router to allow wifi (and usually four more cat-5 ports too).


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#8
July 1, 2015 at 14:54:23
to my house I think I will just try and run a wire. If I am correct, To do that I would connect one end of the wire to the base router inside my house then connect the other end to a router inside the metal building? Is there anything special I would have to do to set up the router or is it as simple as just plugging them into each other?

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#9
July 1, 2015 at 15:08:29
Re #2

PowerLine Adapters allow you to use the house power wiring as a cable connect which saves you having a separate wire. You plug one in near the router then use a short cable to it. You do the same with any other device that you wish to cable connect to the router. This sort of thing:
http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/test-cen...

I've been using much less expensive ones than those showing in the link, for a long time, and they work fine.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#10
July 1, 2015 at 15:34:24
Correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think I can use a power line because I think the house and metall building run off of two different mains. The man cave and the house have two separate breaker boxes.

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#11
July 1, 2015 at 15:37:30
Distance may be a factor; you can only go 100meters on Cat-5; and ideally it ought to be a cable that is suitably weatherproof...

The power line adapter avoids all that hassle; and immediately gives you one cat-5 outlet - and more if you plug in more adapters in "the shed".

The basics system is truly plug and go - out of the box.

And as I say above adding a wifi module is often much the same.

Adding a router either via a direct cat-5 cable between the house and shed, or connecting the additional router to the house router via powerline adapters, will require a little setup; but it's actually quite simple. The shed router has to have its default ip address changed; its DHCP server disabled; and the router set to be an extender/repeater. And it has to be permanently/continually connected via the cat-5 or power line adapter to the main router. It can also be done with suitable kit using wifi as the link- but it's by no means the best way to go.

For simplicity, cheapness, and reliability - use the powerline/homeplug adapter approach. It's plug in, connect each end - and go!


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#12
July 1, 2015 at 15:41:42
The power line adapter sounds interesting. However I don't know if the house and metal shed run off of the same mains. They have separate breaker boxes of that tells you anything


Also do the power line adapter still allow me to connect my phone and other devices through wifi or is it strictly wired?

message edited by Ajoyner41


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#13
July 1, 2015 at 16:24:25
It's strictly wired - unless you include a plugin wifi module. Netgear make one (as do Devolo). And I think most of the other manufacturers do as well.

The "only possible" problem you "may" have is if the there is an RCD in the cct. - in one or both "boxes". Some pholks (at least in Canada/USA) find that gets in the way and prevents the adapters working across some power ccts. Personally, although I have an RCD (sorry GFI - Ground Fault Interrupter in Canada/USA) in one of my two consumer units/"boxes" and not in the other - I have no problems at all with powerline adapters communicating between the two boxes and their respective power ccts.

To clarify my setup a little? I have two "breaker boxes" - aka consumer units (in the UK) - in my house. Logically they are fed/controlled by the same incoming main electrical feed and metered etc. by the same meter. There are power ccts. in both boxes. - those in the non RCD/GFI box are reserved for fridge freezer etc.; and what used to be an office area - with assorted IT kit. I still have networked kit in there. The other "box" - with its RCD/GFI - is the bulk of power distributed around the house... The Devolo kit talks/connects fine between all power ccts. in both consumer units/"boxes".

There have been discussion here between pholks in Canada/USA who have on occasion had problems with an RCD/GFI being in cct. (in the respective breaker box(es); but many have found it to be no problem...

I would suggest you investigate the powerline approach first. Test it and if it doesn't work (try it with cat-5 at both ends first) then return them? Amazon allow returns (30days period as I recall); and likely many decent computer etc. stores (online or on the street) will allow returns if they don't work for you?

The powerline approach, with a wifi adapter included in the shed, is the simplest to set up. And with the wifi module/adapter included you would have the required wifi for phone etc. Equally if the powerlines do work then you also have the option to add in a second router, and configure it as both wifi extender and of course gain four more cat-5 ports in the shed?

If powerline adapter path doesn't work for you, then you are into actual cabling and a wifi extender or a second router in the shed, configured as a repeater etc...


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#14
July 1, 2015 at 16:41:32
Thank you so much. From what your saying I don't see any reason why the powerlines wouldn't work. I was confused with what "mains" were and if the metal shed and house are on the same main. I guess the only way to know is to try it out.

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#15
July 1, 2015 at 16:46:46
I also have one more question. What exactly is a wifi module? Could you link one?

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#16
July 1, 2015 at 16:57:31
Hope I'm reading the posts right but as I understand it the wifi module is what is provided inside a computer for Wifi comms with the router.

As the PowerLine adapter is just a way of not having a continuous physical cable then you can mix and match devices with this and your normal direct Wifi to the router, just as you would with cables.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#17
July 1, 2015 at 17:01:00
The powerline adapters are a very good deal however what else would I need so I could use wifi on my phone while inside the shed?

If I understand this correctly. One of the powerline adapters plugs into the wall then an Ethernet cable connects it to the main router. The second powerline adapter plugs into the shed then I could connect it to a wireless repeater to make wifi in the shed? Won't the wireless repeater just act like an access point? If not, could someone link what I need to connect the powerline adapter to, to have wifi in th shed

message edited by Ajoyner41


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#18
July 1, 2015 at 18:07:06
Yes the main router connects to an adapter via an ethernet cable!; and the adapter in the shed can be a similar ethernet adapter or a wifi one. Some adapters may even allow both, although I'm not sure about that

If the adapter in the shed is a wifi module then it will act as a wifi repeater, or more correctly an extender.

Otherwise if the adapter in the shed is not a wifi module then you need a second wifi capable router. That router, which you connect to the adapter with an ethernet cable, can be almost any make, and preferably one that is fairly current; although even a not so current wifi capable router will do.

message edited by trvlr


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#19
July 1, 2015 at 18:25:10
So something like the link below would be ideal. A powerline adapter with wifi build in.


http://www.netgear.com/home/product...

message edited by Ajoyner41


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#20
July 1, 2015 at 20:40:55
Yes, that one appears to be both a powerline adapter and Wifi access point in one.
By the 'Mains', what we in the US would call the main electrical panel or main panel would be the one right after the power meter, if there is a secondary panel without a main breaker at the top like the main panel has, then it is an auxiliary panel or satellite panel which is slaved to the main panel. If this is your set up then there is a good chance that the powerline adapter set up will work for you.
If not then just running a Cat5 (5E, 6, etc), cable between buildings and setting up a wireless access point will finish the job. The wireless access point can be a wireless router with a few components turned off (as mentioned above) or some wireless range extenders can be used as wireless access points by plugging them in to the Cat5 cable and setting them up properly. Note that the quick set up guides that come packaged with these products do not include the optional set ups for this circumstance but you just need to download the complete manual and look for the proper section of the manual. You can then print out just the pages needed for that set up so it would be handy for you.
Good luck and enjoy.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#21
July 1, 2015 at 20:46:04
An example of homeplug with and without WIFI (extender):

http://www.zyxel.com/objects/newsle...


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#22
July 2, 2015 at 04:32:56
So buying a powerline adapter or "homeplug" with wifi built in means that I then don't have to hook up a wifi module since the adapter will broadcast the wifi in the shed by itself.

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#23
July 2, 2015 at 04:45:40
mmm I may have konphused you by the term wifi module. I was referring to the homeplugs that are wifi equipped - as per the example from "sluc". There are homeplugs that are ethernet connection only; and some that are wifi only; and some (as per "sluc") that are both.

If the homeplug system will work across your assorted/diverse main/power ccts then you would use a module (aka homeplug) that incorporates a wifi function at least - in the shed. Personally I'd ensure I had both ethernet and wifi "modules/homeplugs" in the shed.

Ethernet is inherently more stable, faster and secure than wifi; but wifi has it's uses.

If the homeplug method works then you won't need a wifi extender or wifi capable router in the shed.


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#24
July 2, 2015 at 05:20:13
I think I'm going to gowith this option:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00I6...


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#25
July 2, 2015 at 06:56:08
Good choice as you can return (within 30 days?) if they don't work in your situation. You need one wifi "module" and one Ethernet only module. Ethernet one connects directly to the router and the wifi goes in the shed. No point in buying two wifi modules when an Ethernet one is likely cheaper and all you need at the router end?

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#26
July 2, 2015 at 07:00:18
The link was one wifi module and one Ethernet only, correct?

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#27
July 2, 2015 at 11:54:15
Yes .The router end doesn't need wifi of course; only the "shed" end...

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#28
July 2, 2015 at 11:59:00
Thank you so much for all your help. I will try it out and let you know how it goes

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#29
July 2, 2015 at 13:28:21
Buying from Amazon is a good move, as it will allow a return of the "modules/adapters if they won't work in your situation. Initially test the cct. using the ethernet port on the wifi module in the garage.

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