Solved Extend WiFi range to another building twenty yards away

November 28, 2014 at 19:03:06
Specs: Windows 7
What product do we need to extend our WiFi network from our house to another building about twenty yards away?

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#1
November 28, 2014 at 21:08:52
The most reliable would be two point-to-point wireless antennas. One on each building pointing directly at each other. Preferably with a clear line of sight to each other.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
November 29, 2014 at 00:12:38
If the building is on the same ring main (usually signified by not having its own independent consumer unit) then mains networking is the way to go. Just plug in one unit next to the existing router and connect a LAN cable, then plug another one into a socket in the other building and away you go. I personally like Devolo hardware but most manufacturers do similar bits of kit.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#3
November 29, 2014 at 19:51:43
✔ Best Answer
Basically the two options are these:
Purchase a range extender like this one:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
and position it as near to the out building as possible within the original building.

OR: If the other building is running off of the same main electrical panel then you can purchase a pair of power line networking adapters like these:
http://www.newegg.com/Powerline-Net...

I have the above range extender but I use it as a second wireless access point (connected directly into the hard wired part of the network) in order to improve reception throughout the house (though you need to download the full manual to get those instructions). It is very highly rated for its primary purpose though, it just needs to be placed just inside of the really good range of your current wireless router.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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Related Solutions

#4
November 29, 2014 at 21:53:48
our house to another building

will not be the same "ring". Power circuit is what I believe you meant to say.

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#5
November 30, 2014 at 18:21:48
Different countries, different common terms.
With car/auto parts, spare parts are shortened to 'spares' in England and 'parts' in the USA.
Similar applies to general electrical references between the two countries. Other countries I assume follow one or the other with I assume some variations as well. I may say Panel or Electric Panel where others may say Main, Mains, both meaning 'main electrical panel' or 'main power feed' (into the building).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
December 1, 2014 at 13:16:13
Thanks for the update.

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#7
December 2, 2014 at 01:15:41
In the UK a typical power cct. the sockets are fed from two sides as it were. The power cct. wiring is in effect a ring of cable around the area and both ends of the ring connect to the same cct.. breaker/fuse.. Occasionally a radial cct. may be installed which is simply a single run of cable which feeds a string of outlets.

Neither cct. also feed ceiling lighting directly. Those (lighting) ccts. are simply radial ccts - with no cross/interconection to power ccts.

In Canada/USA the standard is a series of radial ccts.; each of which is usually a mix of power and lighting...; and certain factors determine the mix of power outlets and lighting points on each radial (aka load balancing).

Any power outlat on the same phase (of mains services) can act as a network point with an appropriate adapter; even across separate "rings" or "radials". If there an RCD/GFI involved on any cct. this may impact (negatively) on the use of "lan over mains"/power-line adapters.

This RCD/GFI issue can be (frequently is) a problem in Canada/USA situations; less so an issue in the UK.

In the UK one can have (legally) a split system as it were. Some power outlets protected by an RCD/GFI, and some not so. Typically those not so protected might be fridge freezer outlets, central heating, and outlets servicing critical IT equipment; and one can also have some/all lighting ccts. in this grouping. Those so protected would serve all outdoor outlets, and general indoor outlets other than those as immediately above. My home (in the UK) has a split system; soho equipment, fridge freezer, central heating and indoor lighting are on not on an RCD/GFI.

This link shows the ring main system of wiring - a system considered by many to be more flexible, safer/safest, and also cost effective. It does not of course show an RCD/GFI - which would replace the standard main disconnect switch in a given consumer unit/cct. breaker (fuse) box/panel.

http://tinyurl.com/nwkvsxw


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#8
December 2, 2014 at 07:34:33
I have my doubts that two separate buildings would share a single electrical circuit that would allow one to use the power adapters mentioned above.

I still think the p-to-p antenna's are your best bet.

Here's a quick example of what I'm talking about..............complete with Canadian price. This is just one example of what EnGenius has to offer so if a person wanted, they could research different devices until they find the specific one that fits all their needs.

http://www.shopbot.ca/pp-engenius-e...

If anybody's interested, here's the details on the above device directly from the horses mouth.

http://www.engeniustech.com/busines...

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


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#9
December 2, 2014 at 07:50:00
Inclined to agree with CurtR re' two separate buildings - in a commercial environment. In a domestic environment with two buildings on the same lot they might be on the same main feed/riser into the lot; depending on how it was all installed (the two buildings were fed with electricity paid from the same riser/feed in).

But in the case as described in the OP it sounds as though there are two distinct properties; each with separate owners/householders... Thus likely separate electricity , services/accounts - and thus also likely isolated in terms of phase... But then again who knows... It might be they share a common phase (being so close to one another) and the adapters "might" work. The other user would need to know the passcode to gain access to the adapters of course; and thus the lan itself... It would "not be wise" to use the adapters over such a setup without ensuring there "is" a passcode applied... (otherwise it would leave the lan set up open to penetration and unauthorised access).


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#10
December 2, 2014 at 18:56:15
I read 'our house to another building 20 yards away' as being a garage, barn, work shop, or out building on their property. In these cases the out building may be a single breaker (circuit) for a garage or a sub panel with a few breakers (circuits) as in a work shop. Of course, if it is a completely separate service, it is doubtful that it would work, or at least work well.

A third and more expensive option might be to invest in a fiber optic networking switch/converter and run a separate line out to the other building.

Nice discussion we are having, too bad the OP appears to be missing...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
December 3, 2014 at 10:35:38
If I had the urge or the energy to dig the trench required for running a cable from building to building I would use Cat 6 and some PVC pipe as conduit.

Max segment length for Cat6 is 100 m (320 feet)

20 yards = 60 feet

While I work with quite a lot of fibre optic (as well as fiber channel) on a day-to-day basis, Cat5 or 6 would be a LOT less expensive and it will carry 1 Gig easily. In a case like this, choosing copper over fiber is a no-brainer.

But it's all moot as I'm too lazy dig a trench and do all the required work. I'd buy two p-to-p antennas and be done in about an hour.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


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#12
December 3, 2014 at 18:35:43
I did not realize that Cat6 was rated up to 100m so of course it would be the better choice over fiber. I am not familiar with p-to-p antennas but they sound like a better overall choice for a jump like that. Are they connected directly into the network (Cat5 or Cat6) or is there hardware needed it is used with? I don't personally have the need, but knowledge is always good. I might look into it further just to know.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#13
December 3, 2014 at 21:32:33
The type of antenna I linked above would plug into a switch, SOHO router or even a PC. In most all cases, I would have a SOHO router at either end. Alternatively, I've seen some nice layer 2, 8 port switches I would also seriously consider using in a situation like this.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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