Ethernet networking in a prewired house

July 10, 2010 at 09:52:34
Specs: Windows Vista
I've been using a wireless network, but it has proved to be unreliable and since our house is prewired with cat5e wires, I think it would be best to set up an ethernet network. I found something that said I'd have to go through a distribution module to the correct rooms, but in the box with that, is also the cable and alarm systems and they is nowhere to plug anything in. We use cable internet...how should I peruse this, or would it be best just to get a new wireless router? TY.

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#1
July 10, 2010 at 14:24:51
You can use a router or switch

As the house is prewired with cat cables, I assume there are
wall outlets?


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#2
July 11, 2010 at 11:24:12
There are wall outlets in all the rooms, but the trouble I'm having is accessing the prewired network. I read somewhere you have to go through a distribution module, but the "module" is shared with also the cable and security systems and it doesn't seem like I could use it as a distribution module. Basically I need to give my computer downstairs a reliable connection, but I haven't a clue how to use the prewiring to my advantage.

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#3
July 11, 2010 at 12:22:36
I would have thought the wiring is complete, all you need to do is
plug the router into one of the wall sockets, then the pc into
another?

See if there is a name on the box, then google, you might find a
manual for it.

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


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Related Solutions

#4
July 11, 2010 at 15:06:49
Unfortunately this didn't work, I plugged the router into the wall and tested several different wall sockets, but nothing was recognized. When I looked through the company's page I found mention of having to plug in through a "distribution module" but within this module are all the security, cable, and telephone systems too and it doesn't seem to make sense.

I did wish it would be that simple. Oh...and I do appreciate your help :)


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#5
July 12, 2010 at 08:29:24
Typically, the other end of those cables get punched down to a Patch Panel. You can quickly google that term and have a look at an image to see if it's the same thing you have.

I'm not sure what you mean about a "distribution module" but if you could provide a picture, that would help us figure out how to make your setup work.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
July 12, 2010 at 10:31:50
After looking through everything, I think that the builders just jipped us (wouldn't be the first thing). haha. I think it might just be easier to get a more reliable wireless router.

We are using one now, but it DCs constantly. This has been bugging me like crazy so I wanted something surefire reliable. Im sure there are some well priced routers that are just as reliable as ethernet (I hope), any suggestions? TY


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#7
July 12, 2010 at 11:08:50
Have you considered Home plugs?

Basically you it uses the ring main for the network connection.

http://www.shop.bt.com/products/bt-...
ethernet-female-kit-4Z2J.html#reviews

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


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#8
July 12, 2010 at 12:09:16
So what you're saying is, there's no central location where all the cables terminate to?

If there is, then there's always a way to make it work which my include buying a small patch panel or terminating with RJ-45 ends.

As for your wireless network, if that's a wireless SOHO Router you have, click on my name in any of my responses and read my "how-to" guide on 'troubleshooting wireless issues' and follow the steps.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
July 12, 2010 at 19:26:16
Those homeplugs look very intriguing (your link is broken btw, if you were trying to recommend a particular one). However they ran a bit expensive, perhaps a more reliable wireless router would be best.

@ Curt, I looked up all the modules within the box and it seems that all the cat5e cables there are for the telephones...does this mean we got jipped?


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#10
July 13, 2010 at 04:53:49
I don't know about jipped. If they pulled them for phones they pulled them for phones.

If they left enough spare cable at both ends you could replace the RJ-11 keystone plugs (at the wall outlets) for RJ-45's and then put a proper patch panel at the other end.

In today's world with cordless phones and computers it makes no sense to wire each room in your home for a phone and not the network. Personally, I'd pull two cables to each room and put RJ-45's on them. VoIP phones require a network (RJ-45) connector.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#11
July 13, 2010 at 07:01:17
Well all the outlets are already RJ-45, but looking threw all of this I, perhaps am better off just getting a new router. If I started fiddling around with the wiring I know I'd screw something up...then be without phone too, haha. Thanks anyway I have a much better idea of what's going on than before.

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#12
July 18, 2010 at 11:47:26
I know this is old, but I figured I might as well post for posterity...My house has the same thing, cat5e cables for telephone lines. I didn't need all the telephone jacks, and I'd rather have cordless phones than a wireless network, so I converted most of the jacks to be used for networking.

I went into the panel where the security, cable, and phone lines all meet, cut the phone ones I wanted to hijack, terminated them with regular network plugs, and plugged them all into a switch. It was easy (assuming your wires are marked so you can tell which one goes to which jack) and it works great.

You might also try changing the channel on your wireless router to get a better signal. I find that in some places there's a lot of interference from neighbors or whatever and changing the channel helps dramatically.

Good Luck!
-SN


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