Ethernet in the First Mile Leased line help

August 22, 2010 at 13:30:32
Specs: 7
Hi, I have recently phoned up BT business to discuss the possibility of a leased line for my business but they have decided they cannot help me unless I am going to buy it. This technology is new to me so please bare with me.. I would need one for internet connectivity for web servers and would need multiple ips. Now my question, if I am in the area for 'Ethernet in the first mile' would the fibre cable come into my building then into a router/modem? Or is it completely different than home broadband. Just puzzled me a bit on the device that connects to the fibre, how does it know where to route what ip too, and if I had for example, 10gbps fibre link, wouldn't a router etc act as a bit of a bottle neck?
Please correct me, I would love to know how this all works
Thanks

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#1
August 22, 2010 at 15:21:05
I don't know much about BT but if they don't offer what you want, go to one of their competitors, such as a cable provider or someone else.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
August 22, 2010 at 23:46:27
Yes im going to give virgin media business a ring later on.. But what would the fibre coming into my building terminate into? Do they normally supply the relevent router that could handle the 10gbps link? Or is it a diffrent type of device?

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#3
August 23, 2010 at 03:29:20
Hmm, sounds like BT are particularly unhelpful, and they are expensive too. As other have noted, perhaps try someone else. We use http://www.uk-leased-line.co.uk/ for all our services - might be worth a call.

Anyhow to directly answer your questions, EFM is delivered over multiple copper pairs (2Mb per pair max) and is normally only used for connections up to 8Mb/s although I've seen it used in 5 pairs for a 10meg. A box is supplied by the ISP to re-combine the copper into Ethernet for you to utilise. It isn't suitable for larger connections.

With larger stuff, you will get a router/switch relevant to the speed of delivery, so if you have a massive leased line (you mention 10Gb, that is HUGE!) the you would need a ruddy expensive router, or more cost effectively a managed switch for the delivery, again which would normally be provided by the ISP. All our sites have Cisco routers/switches on the end of the leased lines, and the ones with switches I am aware the routing is performed in the ISP's network somewhere. In either method you can have one/more IP addresses, subject to completing a RIPE justification form normally.


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Related Solutions

#4
August 23, 2010 at 06:02:11
Now my question, if I am in the area for 'Ethernet in the first mile' would the fibre cable come into my building then into a router/modem? Or is it completely different than home broadband

My experience with fibre optic, and I have plenty, is that the provider brings the line into your building and terminates it to a fibre fanout and from there into a media converter (converts fibre to copper).

Both our providers supply their own equipment at the point of ingress. In the one case, it goes from media converter into a Cisco router that has a dialup modem attached to it so the provider can remote access the router in case of disruption of service.

In the other case, the connection goes from media converter to a Cisco 3550 layer 3 switch. Again, they have a dialup modem attached to remote into the unit in case of problems.

Do they normally supply the relevent router that could handle the 10gbps link?

I doubt you'll be getting a 10 GBps link. If you knew what they cost, you'd know why I say that. I'd wager you'll get a link that is less than 100 Mbps. Even a 30 Mbps pipe is a big one when you're talking about an enterprise level connection which isn't choked and limited like a "highspeed internet connection" for home consumption.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
August 23, 2010 at 08:47:37
Ok thanks guys you were both a big help, thats what i wanted to know! Thanks

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#6
August 23, 2010 at 09:27:09
Just got an email off BT, saying that Ethernet for 1st mile is only a max of 10mbps and would be £11k pa, and for a 100mb standard btnet connection, they want £21k a year.
How can a new web-hosting company trying to start off, afford this!
Thanks for everyone's help

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#7
August 25, 2010 at 05:34:19
I would call around to different providers and get quotes.

I'm betting BT isn't the only game in town. At least at that level, they shouldn't be.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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