DSL, router & CAT6, and wireless access point

November 22, 2010 at 12:42:04
Specs: Windows Vista
hi all,

I am new girl here and i believe i have a quite trivial question for you guys, and i am sure u can help me. I work with multimedia.
I have a backyard which is surrounded by 2 smaller buildings.
At my yard main entrance, ISP installed their last connection point for ADSL.
From this little cabinet to my both buildings there is 15 meters distance, and btw the buildings is also 15 m distance, it is like an triangle. As i am in a phase of chaning completely water, electricity, phone and internet lines, i digged a channels in the ground which i dont intend to digg anytime soon

My questions are:

1. Do i have a benefit of laying donw CAT6 cable instead of CAT5e? Even if i do not have benefit right now, as my router is not gigabit router, i think going with CAT6 is something that makes perfect sense with regard that this is more or less permanent installation?

2. My router is Linksys WRT54G (at the moment) and i think it is not a gigabit router, which means that i will not be able tu use the full advantage of CAT6, but one day when i change the router to gigabit, my CAT6 network will support it?

Is Linksys WRT54G right now compatible with CAT6? I seem can not find that info. In a simple wording, can i just plug CAT6 cable in it? is connector compatible?


3. If i place a Linksys WRT54G in a building A, then thats my gateway, isnt it? That means that from building A, network "out" (switch part of router) i need to line the CAT6 cable to the building B?
In a building B i can install small switch (which will have input signal from building A, as mentioned above?) for cabled connections for computers AND another wireless access point???
What do u guys recommend for wireless access point in building B? I buy another router as Linksys WRT54G or there are things just like wireless transmiters?

4. ISP contractor advises me with this cabling http://www.fanton.com/allegati/prod...

with a version 6 x 2 x 0,60...???

I do not speak italian but as far as i see this is a CAT3 standard? Anyone can tell me something about this cable? Contractor says it is for ADSL net, ADSL TV and phone all at once?

Please can u help with this?

thx a million,

Sania


See More: DSL, router & CAT6, and wireless access point

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#1
November 22, 2010 at 13:13:59
1) The biggest difference as I see it is cost. Cat6 is more expensive, noticably so. If you can afford Cat6, then by all means use it.

2) That particular router only offers 100 Mbps to the desktop. However, when you do buy a 1000 Mbps capable router/switch, the Cat6 will support it. It's worth noting that Cat5e also is capable of 1000 Mbps bandwidth

3) Your gateway will be whatever device you have connected to the internet.

Yes, you will need to pull cable to each and every building you want to have connected to the network and the internet. I would decide first which building will "host" it. From the sounds of it, you've decided on Building A.

Yes, all you would need to connect to the cable that runs from A to B is a switch. Then connect clients (and/or a wireless access point) in B to the switch and they'll have LAN and internet connectivity.

What do u guys recommend for wireless access point in building B? I buy another router as Linksys WRT54G or there are things just like wireless transmiters?

I would compare prices between an actual access point and the WRT54G. If the WRT54G is less expensive (and if memory serves me, most any wireless SOHO Router actually is less expensive than an AP) and I would go with whichever is least expensive.

The link you posted didn't work for me. You can use either Cat5e or Cat6 cabling to connect the buildings and the same cable inside the buildings for your runs for wired clients.

Cat3 is a telephone standard. But, you can use both Cat5e and Cat6 as phone wires too. We do it all the time here at work. I'm not sure in what context the contractor was talking about Cat3 but if it's strictly for a telephone line, you can use Cat5e or Cat 6 in place of Cat3

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
November 22, 2010 at 14:20:43
hey Curt, thx for the answers.

it seems i was not so wrong about things :)

here is a correct link:

http://www.fanton.com/allegati/prod...

it is in italian, i do not speak italian, but maybe just from the technical data u may be able to help me encrypt what kind of cable is it? why on the earth they will offer this, if it is really CAT3 standard - to line a cable from their cabinet to my buildings? that way i will never be able to have speedy internet acces in the future? or i am wrong? highest speed they offer at the moment is 20 Mbit/s download
768 kbit/s upload.
i think CAT3 is specified as maximum of 16Mbit/s? am i wrong?

there are some patch panels i will have btw some studio rooms and they are all CAT6 like this one http://www.neutrik.com/uk/en/audio/...

one of my big questions is also: can CAT5e and CAT6 be used interchangibly, mixed in one facility and do their respective connectors fit regardles of cable? are they same?

i hope i am not bothering too much, i just like to clarify all this.

THX a million,

Sania


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#3
November 22, 2010 at 15:16:07
Hmmmm.....I have no idea what type of cable that is. It's an 8 pair (16 wire) and all network cable is 4 pair (8 wire). I'm a network technician by trade and have worked extensively with Cat5, 5e and 6 and it's definitely none of those.

My complete lack of Italian makes it hard for me but I do see "cat.3" in the article so it has to be, at the very least, Cat 3.

As I said previously, you can use Cat 3, 5, 5e, and/or 6 as phone cable. I'm quite positive this is phone as well. In a typical North American home, the phone company pulls in a 2 pair (4 wire) phone cable. This can be used to give you up to 2 separate phone lines as each phone line requires 1 pair. I suspect the aforementioned cable is simply an 8 pair phone wire.


one of my big questions is also: can CAT5e and CAT6 be used interchangibly, mixed in one facility and do their respective connectors fit regardles of cable? are they same?

We have both here where I work, and it's a large environment. About 2 years ago we recabled our entire data center with overhead cable runs and Cat6 cabling. There's still a lot of Cat5e in our environment and of the over 20 (48 port) patch panels in our data center, almost half of those are Cat5e.

The actual RJ45 end's that plug in don't care if it's Cat5, 5e or 6. The end itself will fit in any network (RJ45) receptacle.

I even have some situations where it's Cat6 from the wall outlet to the wiring closet patch panel, and a Cat5e patch cable from wall to computer..........and vice versa.

The important thing is, you do need a Cat6 patch panel for Cat6 cable and a Cat5e patch panel for Cat5e cable. The same is true for the actual "keystone" ends you put on at the wall outlet.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
November 22, 2010 at 15:33:22
Curt,

pardon me once more.
i do not understand this:

"The important thing is, you do need a Cat6 patch panel for Cat6 cable and a Cat5e patch panel for Cat5e cable. The same is true for the actual "keystone" ends you put on at the wall outlet."

what do u mean by "keystone"? also, i understood from above that actually doesnt matter which cable goes to which RJ45 outlet - the connection will work, however, speed can be compromised, if in an all CAT6 network we use soke CAT5e lines / but it will work..? Thats why i do not understabd above statement.

Otherwise, thank u so much for clarifying this to me! great help!

Sania


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#5
November 23, 2010 at 06:14:04
A "patch panel" is a device we use to terminate multiple network cables too.

Say you're running multiple (10) network cables in your house and you want them all to terminate in your "home office" room. You have two choices:

1) Patch Panel - personally, in the above example, I would use a 12 port patch panel.

The following link shows and example of a 24 port patch panel:

http://www.dijitaldepo.com/content_files/prd_images/2810.gif

The network cables you pull around your house connect to the back of the panel. Then you plug your patch cables into the RJ45 jacks on the front.

2) RJ45 ends (male)

http://images.esellerpro.com/2242/I/101/52/medscaleRJ45ends100.jpg

The big difference being, if you used a patch panel, all the cables would be neat and in one place. If you used the RJ45 ends, you'd have 12 loose cables which you'd have to figure out a way to label them so you'd know which goes where. Using a patch panel you have a sheet which says "Port 1 goes to room 1, port 2 goes to room 2" etc

A "keystone" is the kind of RJ45 end we use to attach to a faceplate at a wall outlet. In the case of my home example, you'd use keystones in each room.

The following is an example of a "keystone" style RJ45 (female):

http://clickercable.com/catalog/images/310-120r.jpg


All the aforementioned are "hardware" that you use when you're physically cabling a space.

You will want to use all the same cables through your walls be it Cat5e or Cat6.

What I was saying is, you need to ensure all hardware is for the type of cable you're pulling. So, if you use Cat6 cable in your home, your Patch Panel, Keystones or just plain RJ45 connectors have to be rated for Cat6, not Cat5e.

If you pull Cat6 cable through your walls, it doesn't matter if you use Cat5e patch cables, you can still get 1000 Mbps out of the connections as Cat5e is capable of 1000 Mbps.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
November 23, 2010 at 07:55:59
ahhh, so RJ45's have to be rated for CAT6!!!
i thought all RJ45 are the same...

but my router wont mind RJ45 rated for CAT6, even thought it is not gigabite router?

and also, i figured out that the reason they will use CAT3 cable from outside workld to my router is because my gigabit network exist only after my gateway (inside my house till my router)... is that right??? thats why i need CAT6 inside...
even though max ADSL speed is rated (as thay offer) 20Mbit/s, CAT3 is still short as it is 16Mbit/s?

i hope not to bother u again... i just want to understand!!!

THX a million


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#7
November 23, 2010 at 09:01:37
ahhh, so RJ45's have to be rated for CAT6!!!
i thought all RJ45 are the same...

I should clarify....sorry, I realize upon rereading my last post I misspoke, or at least, wasn't completely clear.

With the RJ45 ends (male) they're typically not specific to a cable type (ie: Cat5e or Cat6) The keystone style RJ45 connectors (female) on the other hand are.

As far as I know, there are two types of RJ45 ends (male). The type you use with solid core wire and the type you use with stranded core wire.

Solid core = 1 single piece of copper in each wire
Stranded = multiple (smaller) wires combined together to form each wire.

One thing to keep in mind, at this point in time I have not made any Cat6 patch cables (but I've made a bajillion with Cat5 and Cat5e). The RJ45 ends for Cat6 may be specific. I know all the Cat6 I've worked with to-date has a thicker casing than Cat5e and also has a divider inside. Typically though, when you pull cable through a wall, it will terminate to a patch panel at one end and a keystone at the other end.

but my router wont mind RJ45 rated for CAT6, even thought it is not gigabite router?

It not only won't mind, it won't know the difference between Cat6 and Cat5e


my gigabit network exist only after my gateway (inside my house till my router)... is that right??? thats why i need CAT6 inside...

Correct!

A typical SOHO (Small Office/Home Office) router is 100 or 1000 Mbps to the desktop (ie: the LAN ports) whereas I've never heard of one with a WAN (external) port that was more than 100 Mbps.

Most ADSL and Cable highspeed connections are from 1.5 to 100 Mbps.
100 Mbps is still rare but it's coming available in more and more places.

Most telco's (telephone companies) typically use a Cat3 type cable because it works perfectly for their needs. It doesn't work for networking. Keep in mind, your ADSL comes through the phone line, into your house to a device called a "modem" (MOdulate/DEModulate) which switches the signal from phone line to network cable. Some Modems are "combo" units which are a modem, a SOHO Router and a wireless access point all in one.

Oh and you're not bothering me and like you, I always like to understand as fully as possible.

:)

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
November 23, 2010 at 17:31:45
great, great... will pop again if i need, but this clarification is just so usefulll. thx!

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#9
December 1, 2010 at 14:56:43
hi again :)

do i have to take special care of NOT running may CAT6 along electricity cables or it really doesnt matter?

thx!


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#10
December 2, 2010 at 06:50:35
electrical should be separate from network wiring due to emf interferance.

ideally when you dug the trenches you ran plastic conduit with pull lines with at least 2" in diameter. This allows you to pull different lines later on.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:


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#11
December 2, 2010 at 18:19:24
thank you... so, 2-3 inches or 10 cm apart from electricity is ok?

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