Solved Do routers require drivers, passwords, keys, etc.?

Dell Dell elemental silver 15.6" xps 15...
February 17, 2017 at 19:05:36
Specs: Windows 8.1, Intel Celeron 1.30GHz
A few months ago I was given a Dell laptop with Windows 8.1. The previous owner had it set up for high speed internet. I am still using dial-up, and the Dell has no dial-up modem. What is necessary to set it up for high speed?

Is a router required? I've seen several used routers in stores such as Goodwill, but they have no instructions. Today I found two, a Belkin Wireless G Router v. 6002. The second is a Linksys Wireless 2.4 GHz Broadband Router with speed booster. They each had the power supply, but that was all.

Would they require a password or key to use? Is it possible to get these online or do they come with the new routers when purchased new?

What is the purpose of a router?


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✔ Best Answer
February 18, 2017 at 06:11:00
Resetting a router back to as new/delivered settings is usually done vi a wee small hole on the back of the router. One inserts something like a paper clip end onto/against a small button/indent within, presses/holds for about 5seconds (this may vary according to make/model of router), while the router is powered on.

Then the default login (to access all router settings - including enabling wifi, which will now be disabled) is rest to typically admin/admin; but that may vary across the makes/models. A manual will have all relevant info to this end.

Of the two models you mention, I'd be more inclined to the Linksys...

message edited by trvlr



#1
February 17, 2017 at 20:43:12
Depending on the provider you go with, they will normally provide you with a cable modem/DSL Modem/DSL Modem-Router combination and any cables software filters required.

Routers/Modems have passwords. The setup instructions will include all information, and the modems/routers usually have the login information right on the box.

What company are you considering going with?

Doing the best I can here... And remember, there's always more than one path to success. :)


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#2
February 18, 2017 at 04:50:46
Also the router wifi details are usually on a sticker on the base of the router.

The items you look for are SSID, Access-key; and also useful to note the mac address.

SSID is the name the router broadcasts when radiating wifi.

The access-key is often mistakenly called the password; and it is essential to know this when you seek to connect to the wifi service radiating from that router.

The mac address is the actual series of numbers and letters (pairs separated by a colon) which is unique to the device, and represents that device on a network. It's a bit like the name of an individual at a given address on.

What is the purpose of a router? It's a bit like an exchange; as it allows information to come and go via between devices various and the internet, or another external network system. Remember that your isp gives/assigns your service a single ip address; and the router allows that to be "shared" in effect, used, by more than one computer when on the network. The facility (programmed into the router) is called NAT (Network Address Translation) and is in effect a clever fudge...

The manuals for most routers can be downloaded from the appropriate websites.

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#3
February 18, 2017 at 05:46:28
If the Wifi log in key or the access password for adjusting settings has been changed (likely) by the previous owner then there will be instructions in the manual for Factory Resetting which will return it to the factory default settings and password.
A router will also add a layer of protection between your machine and the outside world. It is necessary with high speed internet. Most ISP's now use a combination of Modem and Router so you may not need to purchase your own router after you sign up for the service though they may have a charge listed on the bill for the modem/router as a rental above any advertised price (separate but required by them).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#4
February 18, 2017 at 06:09:51
If you intend to stick with dial-up, you'll need an external dial-up modem, probably USB...something like this: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...

If you're going to switch over to high-speed internet, the internet provider will supply a modem/wireless router so there's no need for you to buy anything.


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#5
February 18, 2017 at 06:11:00
✔ Best Answer
Resetting a router back to as new/delivered settings is usually done vi a wee small hole on the back of the router. One inserts something like a paper clip end onto/against a small button/indent within, presses/holds for about 5seconds (this may vary according to make/model of router), while the router is powered on.

Then the default login (to access all router settings - including enabling wifi, which will now be disabled) is rest to typically admin/admin; but that may vary across the makes/models. A manual will have all relevant info to this end.

Of the two models you mention, I'd be more inclined to the Linksys...

message edited by trvlr


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