Solved Do I need to be the modem router to use QoS at home ?

July 19, 2012 at 06:58:52
Specs: Windows 7
Since we are 3 users on the same connection, and I cannot replace the (ALICE DSL) modem router, I would like to do the following:
- set the Alice modem router to create a network 192.168.1.255
- set the Linksys WRT54GL to create a network 192.168.0.255
- DHCP and WLAN services are on the linksys
- linksys will have tomato or dd-wrt installed in order to parameter QoS

architecture would be the following: ISP > Alice modem router > linksys > computers

My main goal is to use the QoS service, do you think it is possible or did I miss an important point ?
Is it possible with this organisation ?


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#1
July 19, 2012 at 07:32:06
✔ Best Answer
Yes, it should be possible. But I have to wonder why you want to make a second, separate subnet on the Linksys router??

You showed the following as your physical setup:

ISP > Alice modem router > linksys > computers

If clients will only be connected to the second (downstream) router then you might as well just put the second router in the same subnet and connect the two routers "LAN port to LAN port"

I have written a guide for adding a second router like this. For more info, simply click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN

My guide details both ways to do it. (ie: separate subnet as versus same subnet)

I use tomato on my WRT54GL at home. I've had one experience with DD-WRT and wasn't impressed. When I tried to remove it from the WRT54GL, I found I couldn't. I'm sorry but, if you do that (fix it so your firmware can't be removed once installed) I wouldn't touch your firmware on a bet. I haven't played with the QoS too much so can't help you with that. From what I remember when I looked at it, it won't be too tough to figure out. I would play with it, get it figured out and configured the way you want before you put it into production.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
July 19, 2012 at 10:03:20
thanks for the great answer which lead me to a simple solution.
You guide seems very good for that, and I will follow it for this purpose.
I assume that since the linksys will be considered as a gateway by the computers connected, the QoS can shape every packets that come through the router.

For this purpose I will use tomato. Also, I found an excellent HOWTO for QoS, with all details included :
http://tomatousb.org/tut:using-toma...

I have all the keys to make a decent connection, finally, and stop rage :), thanks again !


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#3
July 19, 2012 at 13:05:55
Hey, thanks for writing back. I'm always glad to help. And thank you for the link. I'm going to bookmark that in case I ever need to setup QoS on my linksys at home.

I assume that since the linksys will be considered as a gateway by the computers connected, the QoS can shape every packets that come through the router.

You just reminded me of the one time I played with some QoS on a WRT54GL using Tomato. If memory serves me, I had to connect the link between routers to the WAN (External) port of the Linksys. I'm pretty sure that you can't QoS across the LAN ports and it can only be done utilizing the WAN port as your uplink. So, you'll likely have to go with the scenario in my guide wherein you create a separate subnet and connect to the downstream router's WAN port.

Oh and yes, the Linksys router would be the gateway for any devices connected to it.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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