Solved DNS mapping does not work on computers

June 25, 2012 at 01:33:23
Specs: Windows 7
Hi,
I've been trying to map a specific domain name (say a.net) to a local (static) IP of a computer on that specific network, running Apache and used as a server.
I did this by setting the Static DNS mapping configuration on my Dynalink RTA-1025W management panel.
That works flewlessly on my iPhone and iPad, but does not work at all on any computer - desktop or laptop, Mac or PC, WiFi or LAN (tried a few desktop PCs, an iMac, a PC notebook and a MacBook Pro). On all of them, the browser is uncapable of resolving the DNS mapping, showing an error such us "Server Not Found".
The only way I could override that behavior is modifying the hosts file, and that is not a solution for me, as the network is used by guest machines (say, as a public WiFi in an hotel).
Is there a better approach for that?

Thanks


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✔ Best Answer
June 26, 2012 at 10:10:05
Saare,

are you allowed to configure dns entries at one or both of the dns servers of you ISP?
I assume you are not.

Therefore, the only way, to manage that, is to run your own dns server in house.
This dns server should use your ISPs dns server in the forwarding section.
But you can add your own entries, like RRs (Resource Records) and PTRs (Pointer Records) to your dns, to point to you local apache server.

Then all clients should use you inhouse dns server, to resolve dns queries.



#1
June 25, 2012 at 07:33:10
What kind of domain are you creating here?

Is it private, as in behind a firewall in a LAN, or is it public?

Is this a domain for a web page only, or for a computer network....as in a Windows Active Directory domain?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
June 25, 2012 at 09:44:59
When setting this DNS server at the Dynalink router, you don't have to set this at the client devices, such as PCs, Laptops aso.

The client devices has to be configured, to use the Dynalink routers ip address as default gateway and DNS server, where the Dynalink router acts as a DNS forwarder for the client devices.

The clients normally should get these settings via DHCP from the router automatically.

No need to configure the clients manually.

This should work for you.


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#3
June 25, 2012 at 10:10:03
I believe the issue is the OP is trying to map an internal domain name to an internal ip address.

Further I believe he is trying to use a dns entry in the router that refers to a internet based domain name for the local domain name resolution. Which is why it doesn't work.

Saare you should consider getting a internet based domain name and then redirect that domain name to the internal server housing your web server.

Or bring up an internal dns server that everyone points to that also forwards to the internet.

what you need to avoid is using a domain name that exists on the internet or this won't work.

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Related Solutions

#4
June 25, 2012 at 10:22:55
Oh, then I misunderstood the OP.
Anyway, that doesn't declare, why the iPhone and iPad do work, while the PCs, Laptops aso. doesn't.

Saare,
what is difference in the configuration of the iPhones and iPads and the other not working PCs and Laptops?

What OS is the Apache installed to?
Maybe you can configure the Apache server, to also act as a DNS server.
In that case, you can configure the DNS server, to point to a local IP address for a given domain name.


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#5
June 25, 2012 at 10:42:22
The domain name I'm trying to attach is not registered, though for that matter I am planning on purchasing it at the future (is that impossible?). Right now I'm trying to map an unregistered domain name to the static IP of my machine, to show a specific website.
I now realized that all of my computers have a static IP set, while my iPhone and iPad use DHCP to resolve an IP. I tried chaning some of my computers to use DHCP for testing but it still won't work.
Currently the Apache is installed on Windows 7, though it will probably be changed to some Linux distribution at the future. I can change that to Ubuntu for now, if that helps.

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#6
June 25, 2012 at 10:57:11
If I'm understanding you correctly, you can create a second DNS forward lookup zone on your DNS server that matches the domain name of that unregistered domain, and point it to your internal server's IP address.

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#7
June 25, 2012 at 11:02:25
I'm assuming you mean Static DNS mapping - if so, that's what I did, but it won't work correctly, as demonstrated above.

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#8
June 25, 2012 at 11:15:13
I'm not seeing why it won't work as long as your clients are using your DNS servers that have the zone. You clients should be using DHCP and your DHCP server should hand out the internal DNS servers IP's to connecting clients.

I did this same thing at home to point my Internet domain name to the same host as my Citrix Access Gateway internally (my external domain was different than my internal domain name) so I only needed to buy one SSL certificate.

Tony


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#9
June 25, 2012 at 11:37:12
Main question is, is there a DNS server running?
And if so, what DNS server is running?

The router is not a DNS server, but a DNS forwarder.


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#10
June 25, 2012 at 11:45:53
I am using the two DNS servers of my ISP. Should I add anything?

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#11
June 25, 2012 at 12:00:47
He is using the routers dns mapping which is not the same as having your own dns server.

You shouldn't have to create another zone since this internal only. You would only need host and ptr records that say domain name and the static ip of the windows 7 pc.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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#12
June 26, 2012 at 07:35:54
If one system works then use tools on it to decide why it works.

Normally you resolve names by some means. Not sure what this router is doing that you can resolve names either. It might be able to be fixed there.

Yes, local dns if offered in dhcp or added statically would or should resolve names if not cached. Even if the name is not a fully qualified name it should report in dig or nslookup or other dns tools.


Browsers don't care about mapping at all unless you are really taking about some re-direct. The OS uses name to ip then the browser uses the page.


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#13
June 26, 2012 at 10:10:05
✔ Best Answer
Saare,

are you allowed to configure dns entries at one or both of the dns servers of you ISP?
I assume you are not.

Therefore, the only way, to manage that, is to run your own dns server in house.
This dns server should use your ISPs dns server in the forwarding section.
But you can add your own entries, like RRs (Resource Records) and PTRs (Pointer Records) to your dns, to point to you local apache server.

Then all clients should use you inhouse dns server, to resolve dns queries.


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#14
June 27, 2012 at 08:46:54
"Yes, local dns if offered in dhcp or added statically would or should resolve names if not cached. Even if the name is not a fully qualified name it should report in dig or nslookup or other dns tools. "

There is no dns resolution so any "tools" won't work.

You can't be pointed to internet based servers and have local name resolution. This is why MS has its own dns server. It's used to local name resolution.

Unless the router is running some form of dnsmasq routers do not do name resolution. All they do is pass the request for name resolution thru. This can be to the specific isp dns server or just out the gateway ip in hopes some dns server would answer.

Saare following paulsep's advice will solve your issue.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
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#15
June 27, 2012 at 09:05:25
Thanks everyone, following paulsep's advice I looked into it, and I found MaraDNS could be of a good use for me - will test that. Do you got any other recommendations?

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#16
June 27, 2012 at 11:42:08
Another popular option is BIND

DNS Server Software Comparison

Tony


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