Solved Discoverying other network devices

April 23, 2020 at 08:19:05
Specs: 10 64-bit, 3Ghz/8GB Ram
I had my network sharing all setup until the last major update (within the past several weeks). I just allow my computer to install the recommended updates and nothing extra or optional. Anyways I had recently installed Windows 10 on 2 different manufacturer computers. Before when they were working they would each list themselves as well as each other under the Network folder in Explorer. Then I don't know what happened. I had an update that took a long time on each computer and at the time I was addressing the difference of private network and public network settings on both computers, which I shut down (unchecked) the public network access by deselecting check marks for apps listed as on the public network in windows firewall settings.

Anyways, today I had some time and after checking the settings on both machines (they match) and after not changing anything I have one computer that now lists only the other computer and the other computer lists only itself. So, I have one computer that works as it should (by listing the other computer and its shared folders) and another that lists itself and the folders I want to share. The one that isn't working is the one that I first installed Windows 10. Using the same email address I loaded Windows 10 onto another (separate license) and that's when things got a little weird. By default the install on the second setup turned it like a tablet or something similar to a work tablet where things were shared weirdly. I was having folders and files appear on the second because of shared folders on the first. I believe these were shortcuts to the first computer. Anyways, i don't remember what I did but I eventually did get the second to be used as a separate computer and eventually got the computers to share folders with each other, which has since discontinued.

I would like to know how I get the first to discover the other computer. I suspect that whatever is wrong with it has something to do with why it lists itself as the only device on my network. As well, both computers show my router on the network.Both computers are Windows 10 Pro 64-bit and are separately licensed.

Any ideas of what is going on?


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✔ Best Answer
April 27, 2020 at 08:16:08
Getting them to connect to shares on other Windows based PC's actually worked quite well considering the issue with "seeing" other LAN clients.

If you're storing that much data that you run out of space regularly you might want to give some thought to how, and where you store.......and what you're storing.

For personal stuff that you definitely do not want to lose and are unreplaceable like pictures, video's of the family and critters, .pdf copies of personal documents etc, use the NAS.

For non-personal things that you'd rather not lose, but are actually replacable, like all the movies and stuff you're watching and want to keep, consider using an older PC and creating a NAS out of it.

I don't know if you're familiar with Linux or UNIX but if you are, you could use the zfs file system. I have a FreeBSD box here in my office with 4 - 2 TB drives in it using zfs. They're in what amounts to a RAID 5 array. This is where I store stuff like backups for our Windows PC's (I always do an image backup of the entire C: drive). If I were to store a bunch of movies and stuff like that, this is where I would do it. Should the day ever come where I run out of room (4 x 2TB drives in a RAID 5 = 6 TB's of actual storage), I will build another PC with larger drives (and possibly more drives too) and then I will just move that data over to it.

When you're mapping the drive you are using the correct format are you not?
examples:
\\hostname\share
or
\\xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx\share

You have to have the double backslashes at the begining

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
April 23, 2020 at 20:55:48
Windows 10 can be weird sometimes in sharing when not on a server network.
If you can add the name of the log in you use on the other computer under sharing and select its rights you should see it then.
Others who work with Windows 10 more will probably pop by soon with other suggestions as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
April 24, 2020 at 07:14:16
I became disenchanted with Windows ability to "see" other computers in a basic LAN back in the 98 days so I quit bothering to try. All you really need to know is the IP address of the other computer(s) in your network with shares you wish to attach to. Map a drive and tell it to reconnect at bootup and forget about it.

Better yet, buy a NAS device, connect it to your LAN, put all the data you wish to save and/or share on the NAS device and stop making shares on the other computers completely. Then you only really need to remember one IP address.

A NAS is a great idea as it will protect your data from loss as well as give you a single share point for all computers on your LAN.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
April 24, 2020 at 09:19:41
The history of windoze networking issues is a long saga of unresolved events. The geniuses at M$-land are clearly too busy phyxing things in wondoze that anin't broke, and ignoring those that are.

I echo Johnw re' a decent NAS One that you also backup regularly too - just in-case - to a stand alone (usb) drive; which seldom is powered up until required - and that backup isolated from the lan until required that way


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#4
April 24, 2020 at 21:28:32
Windows 95 may have been the easiest for sharing but most of us had only one computer in the home then. Windows 98 was the same under the hood but more polish to it.
Windows XP was fairly straight forward and probably a good compromise between easy and secure (at least at the time).
Windows 7 was/is a bit more annoying on sharing but Windows 10 Takes the Cake on that front.
I purposely skipped ME, Vista, and 8/8.1 .....

An NAS is a good idea with a back up plan that you stick with.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
April 25, 2020 at 03:28:17
I never had any luck with any previous versions of windows connecting with each other on a LAN. I was actually amazed that I got Windows 10, which is why I was hoping to fix.

I have a NAS. I need to replace the drive every two years and that is just to store stuff and not something that I need to access daily. Until I can find an affordable NAS that can fit a ssd in it ... I want to start using my laptops because they have large ssd's and according to their manufacturer's I should never have to worry about replacing them. I watch alot of video content.

I tried punching in the IP address but was unsuccessful. I can only hope a new update will resolve?

message edited by sluytman


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#6
April 27, 2020 at 08:16:08
✔ Best Answer
Getting them to connect to shares on other Windows based PC's actually worked quite well considering the issue with "seeing" other LAN clients.

If you're storing that much data that you run out of space regularly you might want to give some thought to how, and where you store.......and what you're storing.

For personal stuff that you definitely do not want to lose and are unreplaceable like pictures, video's of the family and critters, .pdf copies of personal documents etc, use the NAS.

For non-personal things that you'd rather not lose, but are actually replacable, like all the movies and stuff you're watching and want to keep, consider using an older PC and creating a NAS out of it.

I don't know if you're familiar with Linux or UNIX but if you are, you could use the zfs file system. I have a FreeBSD box here in my office with 4 - 2 TB drives in it using zfs. They're in what amounts to a RAID 5 array. This is where I store stuff like backups for our Windows PC's (I always do an image backup of the entire C: drive). If I were to store a bunch of movies and stuff like that, this is where I would do it. Should the day ever come where I run out of room (4 x 2TB drives in a RAID 5 = 6 TB's of actual storage), I will build another PC with larger drives (and possibly more drives too) and then I will just move that data over to it.

When you're mapping the drive you are using the correct format are you not?
examples:
\\hostname\share
or
\\xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx\share

You have to have the double backslashes at the begining

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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