DD-WRT Can't Access Bridge Client

Microsoft Windows xp home edition eng 3p...
September 25, 2012 at 17:18:33
Specs: XP, Pentium 4
I thought I set up everything correctly, only to discover I should have set a static ip address before beginning. I then set the static ip address and tried it but it didn't work.

Then, when I connected my client router via ethernet cable, I can bring up the internet, but when I attempt to login to 198,162,1.2 it's unable to connect.

Windows was unable to diagnose the problem. Any ideas what I'm doing wrong?

Thanks.


See More: DD-WRT Cant Access Bridge Client

Report •

#1
September 26, 2012 at 04:05:06
Please describe your environment in more details.
How is everything connected?
What ip addresses are you dealing with?
Does the client get the ip address via DHCP?
Which device provides DHCP service?

Report •

#2
September 26, 2012 at 07:23:57
Then, when I connected my client router via ethernet cable, I can bring up the internet, but when I attempt to login to 198,162,1.2 it's unable to connect.

I suspect you're attempting to connect to the wrong IP address.

Open a command prompt window (ie: Start >> Run >> type cmd and hit Enter) and perform the following command:

ipconfig /all

Look for the "Default Gateway" address....that's the LAN address of your router and is the IP you need to use in your web browser to connect to the router's management interface.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#3
September 26, 2012 at 18:32:48
Thanks for your reply. I did the cmd and found that the default gateway is 192.168.1.1. When I enter that as my url I get the login page to my main router, not to my second router that I want to use as a client bridge.

In attempting to set up the client bridge I assigned it to 192.168.1.2. When I attempt to login without Ethernet connection to that router), I get a message saying "The server at 192.168.1.2 is taking too long to respond." When I was wired to that bridge router last night, I kept getting yahoo search results for the term "192.168.1.1 or .2" instead of allowing me to enter the router's settings page.

Thanks again. Any ideas where to go from here?


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 27, 2012 at 10:02:30
How are you connecting with your client? Is it a wireless client or is it a wired connection plugged into the upstream router?

Have you tried plugging a client into the downstream router and then check to see if you have connectivity?

The next step, as I see it, is to confirm you have the second router properly configured and working.

I think the easiest way to test is take a client and plug it into a LAN port on router 2 (downstream) and ensure the NIC is set to DHCP. Does the client get a proper IP address? Can it ping the gateway address (LAN IP of router 1)? Can it access the internet?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#5
September 27, 2012 at 11:50:23
Curt. thanks for your help. I desperately need it.

I'm not especially knowledgeable about this and quite frankly, some of what you just asked has gone over my head, but let me try and answer the best I can.

I want a wireless connection from router to bridge. I thought I had it configured properly, than as I said, I read another post saying that I needed a static ip address. I set that and tried it out by plugging the bridge in at a midway point between the first router/modem and my desktop on the other side of the house. There was no improvement in signal strength so I figured something's not right.

Back to the drawing board, I planned to go in and change/save settings now that a static ip was set, hoping that would resolve things, but I wasn't and haven't been able to login to the bridge's setup page as described in previous posts.

You asked me the following questions

..."Have you tried plugging a client into the downstream router and then check to see if you have connectivity?"

I assume you mean plugging my notebook via Ethernet into the client router that's not wired in any way, correct? I just did that and wasn't able to connect.

..."The next step, as I see it, is to confirm you have the second router properly configured and working.

I think the easiest way to test is take a client and plug it into a LAN port on router 2 (downstream) and ensure the NIC is set to DHCP. Does the client get a proper IP address? Can it ping the gateway address (LAN IP of router 1)? Can it access the internet?"

I don't know how to do this, can you guide me through it?

FYI, because of the complexity of setting up DD-WRT with the linksys54G ver.5 router, I purchased a refurbed router with DD-WRT already installed. Would a simple solution to the problem be to do a hard reset and start over from the beginning? But, I wouldn't want to attempt this if there was any possibility it cold screw up my DD-WRT software install? It would be a nightmare if that got messed up.

Thanks again for your help.




Report •

#6
September 27, 2012 at 12:18:41
No I haven't. I assume you mean plugging via Ethernet the client router into one of the LAN ports, is that correct? How will I know if I have connectivity?

Yes, I mean plug a client computer (laptop or PC) into a LAN port on the downstream router. If the NIC on the computer you use is set to get it's TCP/IP settings automatically (via DHCP) you can tell easily by opening a web browser and trying to surf the web. If you can, you have connectivity. If you can't, you don't.

If you're not able to surf the web, open a command prompt window (Start >> Run >> type cmd and hit Enter) and perform the following command:

ipconfig /all

The output of the ipconfig command should have as it's gateway IP address, the same IP as the LAN IP of the router connected to the internet. You should be able to ping that IP and get a reply. Your IP address should be within the subnet you're using and will likely be in the range of 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.199. If your IP address shows a 169.254.xxx.xxx address, then you're not contacting the DHCP server and do not have LAN connectivity.

Just FYI, I've never done this type of setup using bridge mode and wireless. I always use a wired connection between network appliances as it makes setup and troubleshooting so much easier. I have written a guide that details how to add a second router to your LAN using a wired solution. Reading it may help you out with the configuration of your network settings on the 2nd router. It won't help you to connect the two routers wirelessly using one as a bridge however. That info you'll have to get out of the manual(s) or somewhere else off the net. To get to my guide simply click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#7
September 27, 2012 at 12:39:37
Curt, somehow I ended up posting before I compled my post. Unfortunately, you responded be my partial post. The completed post is now above your post.

As a way of possibly simplifying things, this was my last paragraph in that post...

FYI, because of the complexity of setting up DD-WRT with the linksys54G ver.5 router, I purchased a refurbed router with DD-WRT already installed. Would a simple solution to the problem be to do a hard reset and start over from the beginning? But, I wouldn't want to attempt this if there was any possibility it cold screw up my DD-WRT software install? It would be a nightmare if that got messed up.

Could this be the simplest way to resolve this?


Report •

#8
September 27, 2012 at 13:59:18
FYI, because of the complexity of setting up DD-WRT with the linksys54G ver.5 router, I purchased a refurbed router with DD-WRT already installed. Would a simple solution to the problem be to do a hard reset and start over from the beginning? But, I wouldn't want to attempt this if there was any possibility it cold screw up my DD-WRT software install? It would be a nightmare if that got messed up.

Oh, I doubt you have to worry about hurting DD-WRT by resetting the router to factory defaults so I would definitely do that. At this point in time, it will be a lot easier than anything else. Especially since it appears the second router is not configured correctly.

Assuming the router connected to the internet (Router 1) has the following configuration:

LAN IP: 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
DHCP Enabled = Yes
DHCP Scope = 192.168.1.100 through to 192.168.1.199

Here's how you want to setup Router 2:

LAN IP: 192.168.1.2
SM: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
DHCP Enabled = No (you only want one DHCP server running)

Before connecting router to to router 1, ensure you can connect to it's management interface using 192.168.1.1
NOTE: for future reference, if you need to connect to this router's management interface for any reason, use a client that is plugged in with a network cable to one of the two routers. Always use a client that's connected via network cable as typical setup is to shut off wireless access to the management interface (so as to avoid having your router hacked by a wireless client).

Read my guide and if at all possible, connect the two routers with a network cable. This is not only a lot easier, it's a lot more reliable too.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#9
September 27, 2012 at 20:57:01
Curt,

I did a hard reboot and was able to access the interface but wasn't able to set it up. I tried several tutorials with no success. Often I would set firewall settings or something else and lose my internet connection -- even though I was hard wired to the client router at the time. It's been maddening.

What I want to do is be able to extend my first router's wireless signal so I can connect to my desktop on the other side of the house. It seems like a simple job if someone knows how to do it. I think it's called having a client bridge with a repeater.

Before creating a post offering someone $50 for successfully talking me through the process, I thought I'd offer you first chance since you've been so kind to me.

Let me know if you're interested along with a way to reach you and we'll set something up. If you're not interested but know someone who is, I'd welcome hearing from them.

Thanks again for all your help.


Report •

#10
September 28, 2012 at 07:20:10
To be honest, I wouldn't touch DD-WRT for twice that money. I've been avoiding saying it but will now.

A friend of mine called me because he was having issues with his Linksys WRT54GL. He had installed DD-WRT on it on someone elses advice. Had he asked me, I'd have had him put Tomato firmware on it because that's what I use on my WRT54GL. I tried to updgrade the firmware on his unit to Tomato with no luck. I then tried to return it to the firmware Linksys shipped it with and couldn't do that either. After wasting a couple hours trying to get rid of DD-WRT I came to realize they (the makers of DD-WRT) made it nearly impossible to remove on purpose to force people to continue using their product once they'd installed it on something.

I will not support anybody who uses such slimy, underhanded tactics. For what it's worth, he bought a new router and put tomato on it because DD-WRT didn't offer do what he wanted. I'm not sure if he threw out or gave the DD-WRT router out and don't care. All I know is, he asked me if I wanted it and my answer was a firm "no thank you!"

Having said that...I suspect your best bet is to get somebody with experience in setting up routers to help you.

I think it's called having a client bridge with a repeater.

In order to connect the two routes wirelessly, one would have to be in "bridge mode". I've never done this myself, as I've stated, I would hardwire the two together with a network cable because it's much more reliable. But I do know one device would have to be set to bridge. Some router's don't have a "bridge mode" but instead use something called "WDS" which is wireless distribution system. So if you can't find a "bridge mode" setting, you would look for WDS.

Again, I don't "do" DD-WRT and cannot tell you which it would use.

I will say in closing, if you can pull a cable from router 1 to where you want router 2, I would say do so. Heating ducts work very well for this. If you own, or can borrow a fishtape I would try pulling a cable and using that to connect the two. Don't forget, whatever you do, keep my how-to guide bookmarked so whomever you hire can give it a read if interconnecting two routers is new to them.

Sorry I couldn't be of more help to you.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#11
September 28, 2012 at 07:57:29
@ealvin

Check this documentation:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.ph...


Report •

#12
September 28, 2012 at 09:41:22
Thanks again Curt for all you help and I respect your take on this.

Report •

#13
September 28, 2012 at 09:48:55
Thanks for the link but I've had it with all of this. It's been exhausting.

If you know how to do this and would like to talk me through the process, I'd be happy to compensate you for it, but at this point I don't want to have to wade through the process by myself. If this appeals to you, let me know how to contact you and we can set something up.


Report •

Ask Question