Solved Daisy-chaining routers or alternative

June 28, 2011 at 08:22:06
Specs: Windows XP
Here is a scenario I often run into. I go to install a server and Cisco RVS4000 router at a customer site. I find that they have some other router (ex. Linksys) and often a wi-fi access point connected to it. The kicker is, the other router was usually installed by some other person in the past and no one knows passwords to access it. Plus, I don't want to access their router with all kinds of connections through it, break it, and therefore OWN it. I need my server to be separated from their wi-fi, etc. for security purposes. I also need to access my server remotely via Logmein (cannot use VPN at this time for other reasons).

Can I chain the routers? Or put a switch on the broadband modem and hang both routers off of that? What is the best solution. I hope I have given clear info. Thank you.


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#1
June 28, 2011 at 09:15:15
✔ Best Answer
Click on my name above in my response and read my "how-to" guide titled, "Add a second Router to your LAN"

If you don't need a separate, segmented subnet, it should be easy enough in all cases to use the scenario in my guide where you connect "LAN port to LAN port".

You will likey have to do a port forward on both routers to access the server remotely. It would be the same in both cases:

Forward [logmein Port Numer] to [LAN IP of server]

Putting a switch between the routers and the internet won't work as you probably only have a single WAN IP address and because of that, only one router would get internet connectivity.

Daisychaining will work well enough to serve your purpose.

If you can't access the management console of the routers that are in place to ascertain the DHCP Scope, keep in mind most use .100 to .199 so using a static IP like: 192.168.x.10 for the LAN side of your router should work. I would then use something like 192.168.x.11 for the server.

As long as the IP's you use are outside the defined scope you won't need to worry about duplicate IP's or using reservations or anything like that.

Do document all sites and the pertinent TCP/IP info for your equipment.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
June 28, 2011 at 13:35:59
Thank you very much for the guide. I am using separate subnets so Version 2 will apply. As far as accessing the server remotely, I will just have to play around with it. If I can't get access to the first router (and I don't want to hard reset it), then I won't be able to port forward. I'll cross that bridge when I come to it. Thanks again.

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#3
June 28, 2011 at 14:13:41
You're right, without being able to access the first router, you can't configure a port forward on it.

Surely someone at the site has the login information and the ability to create a port forward if you supply them with the target IP and the port number for forward?!?! That would certainly be helpful and at the same time, the person in question could confirm the DHCP Scope for you.

If not, I would suggest asking them to supply you with the password so you can do it yourself. If for instance, they hire a contractor/company to do this type of work for them, a reputable business will have supplied them with all pertinent documentation, including the login information for the routers management interface.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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