Solved Crazy Wi-Fi Networking Issue

Microsoft Windows xp home edition eng 3p...
September 5, 2012 at 11:03:57
Specs: XP, Pentium 4
I recently purchased a new desktop and was hoping that it might improve my wi-fi reception from my WRT54G router that located a ways from the computer. It didn't, and might even be worse than before.

A friend urged me to buy a Netgear N router believing I would get a much better result. It hasn't. I typically receive a Poor/1 bar signal, and Fair/2 bars is the best I've ever got. On my old XP I'd often get Good or Excellent (sometime poor also) but would often lose its connection all together. My Vista notebook has always gotten a stronger signal at the same location and is now showing 3/4 bars and rarely loses its signal.

I've had numerous email exchanges with Netgear but the results haven't changed. Thinking that maybe I had a bad network card in the new computer, I spoke to Asus tech support and they upgraded my wireless drivers but that didn't make a difference either.

The bottom line is this: I'm now getting a poorer result with my new computer and N router than I did with my old XP and G router (neither of which is really acceptable).

This doesn't seem to make sense and I'm really frustrated. Any ideas what I might do to fix this? Thanks in advance for any help in solving this maddening problem.


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#1
September 5, 2012 at 13:16:19
What type of house or building is it? Where is the router in relation to the computers? Include the distance.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
September 5, 2012 at 14:23:20
It's a decent sized house with the router on the main level on one side and the desktop on the bottom floor on the other side. While it may be a ways away, I think the key point is that I did better with an older/less sophisticated computer and router. If everything is set up and running correctly, is there any way this should be less effective that the previous incarnation?

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#3
September 5, 2012 at 15:00:24
✔ Best Answer
A friend urged me to buy a Netgear N router believing I would get a much better result. It hasn't.

I could have saved you the $$$ and told you beforehand a wireless N router wouldn't make a difference. Sadly, your friend doesn't know much about the topic at hand and that's why he/she offered that advice.

The bottom line is this: I'm now getting a poorer result with my new computer and N router than I did with my old XP and G router (neither of which is really acceptable).

Yeah, the issue is severalfold:
1) distance from PC to router
2) number of floors/walls in between (interferance)
3) power of antenna on router
4) power of antenna on PC wireless NIC.

Since you now have two wireless routers, what you could do is configure the second one to be in the same subnet as the first one (the one connected to the internet) and the same WLAN info (SSID, encryption key etc) and then put it physically about halfway between router 1 and your desktop. Then connect router 2 wirelessly, in bridge mode, to router one.

You should then get an excellet signal to router 2 from your PC after that.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
September 5, 2012 at 20:45:35
William, thanks for your reply.

First, out of curiosity why wouldn't the N give better reception than the G? Isn't it touted to be an upgrade?

Also, I'm not sure of all the technical details but it does raise a question. I've heard the advice about locating your router in a central location, but ASFARASIK, my router needs to be hard wired to my modem which is in the kitchen on the far side of the house. So this question applies to your suggestion as well. How would I make that 2nd router in a central location.


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#5
September 6, 2012 at 05:31:02
If the router is laying on the floor, put it on a table or something. I've seen that make a difference in wireless reception. How far is "a ways away"?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#6
September 6, 2012 at 07:31:33
First, out of curiosity why wouldn't the N give better reception than the G? Isn't it touted to be an upgrade?

How far, and how well, a wireless signal travels has nothing to do with the revision of wireless (A, B, G, N etc) and has everything to do with the power of the antenna. As you've discovered, just because a device is a newer revision, doesn't mean it's more powerful.

N improves bandwidth and gives 100+ Mbps bandwidth, whereas with G you only get about 56 Mbps.

Antenna power is a hardware issue unrelated to the actual bandwidth capabilities of a wireless device.

So this question applies to your suggestion as well. How would I make that 2nd router in a central location.

You're correct, your first router (Router 1) needs to be physically connected to your modem. As to how to located Router 2 in a central location....I explained that above. You would first of course configure it, but once configured, you simply set it in a central location and plug it in.

You would configure it to connect wirelessly using bridge mode to Router 1.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
September 6, 2012 at 13:38:52
Thanks again for all of your help and info. I'm really excited that you believe the dual routers should yield an excellent signal. I assume that this is true ever with different brands of routers, correct?

So as to not burden you, can you point me to a link with a step-by-step on how to do this? I think I conceptually understand this but there are some technical details that I'm not exactly sure how to handle.

Since you're so knowledgeable, I wonder if you could tell me what's going on this this? On this desktop in the basement, I have Sirius Internet Radio playing and I broadcast it to my other radios in the house with a low-power FM transmitter. In addition to frequently losing my wi-fi connection, which of course stops the Sirius broadcast, I've also discovered this phenomenon. I won't hear any sound from my computer speakers, and the app doesn't indicate that it has a problem or stopped the feed. When viewing the current song playing info displayed on the app it is current with what I'm hearing from that Sirius channel playing on on my notebook.

It seems like the Sirius player is getting enough of a signal to be/stay connected but not enough to generate the power it need to produce the feed. I hope I've explained this clearly and wonder if you have any thoughts on this?

Thanks again for everything. Your help is much appreciated.


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