Solved Connecting two different networks on diff ISPs

April 21, 2012 at 14:06:13
Specs: Windows 7
I have a 192.168.1.xxx network connected to Verizon FIOS via Actiontec MOCA / router.

I also have a 192.168.15.xxx network connected to Comcast via Motorola VT2442 router (used for Vonage) and a Motorola SB6121 cable modem.

Each network has it's own gigabit switch connected to each router. The two networks are physically separated but switches and routers are physically side by side.

What is the best configuration to allow devices on 192.168.1.xxx network to communicate with devices on the 192.168.15.xxx network (share printers, NAS, etc), but still have each network served by it's respective ISP, and each device still get it's dhcp, dns, gateway, etc from each respective router?


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✔ Best Answer
April 25, 2012 at 18:21:16
I think I discovered the solution ...

Set one router to 192.168.1.1, and set the other to 192.168.1.2

Set the devices using static IPs to use one router (Verizon), or the other router (Comcast)

Link the Switches to each other

Now - everyone is on 192.168.1.x so they can share resources, but use different ISPs for connecting to the internet.

Turn off DHCP in one router and only use DHCP on the other one, simply keeping in mind which traffic needs to go where.



#1
April 21, 2012 at 14:15:46
Stop using class based subnets and use a dedicated subnet mask for this case.

Text, talk, drive...CRASH.

Hang up and drive @#$%^^


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#2
April 21, 2012 at 14:23:45
Could you be a little more specific? or point me to docs?

Thanks,


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#3
April 21, 2012 at 18:03:04
Why don't you get a dual WAN router?

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Related Solutions

#4
April 21, 2012 at 18:08:51
It's a long story - but there is a reason they need to be separate.

In addition - the Verizon FIOS router is needed for TV functionality.


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#5
April 22, 2012 at 14:01:08
I know that there is probably a way to do this, but why do the WANs have to be different? Even if your FIOS router is needed for your TV you could still connect a dual WAN router up behind it.

Other than that I'm thinking a VPN into your other network, keeping your local gateway for internet access. But I think there is a simpler way to do this, it's just eluding me.

There maybe a way to do this using subnet masks, but I have only set them up for network segmenting using the same ISP, not the other way around.


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#6
April 22, 2012 at 16:03:21
I thought of putting them on the same physical switch, or connecting the switches, and using a 255.255.252.000 subnet (or something ike that) - but I would run into the prblem of dual DHCP servers (the routers) and how to I keep the one set to only get 192.168.1.xxx addresses, and keep the other set only getting 192.168.15.xxx addresses.

I am assuming the solution is to set one router (Motorola VT2442 for Comcast) as a gateway and connect it to the Verizon router ... so all the 192.168.xxx.xxx traffic stays inside the house, while each respective network and router uses it's ISP.


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#7
April 22, 2012 at 19:06:29
What I am trying to do is connect two different private LANs for sharing of printers, NAS, etc ... but each private LAN on a different network and a different ISP continues to function as such.

192.168.1.xxx to see and share resources with 192.168.15.xxx BUT

192.168.1.xxx uses Verizon, and 192.168.15.xxx uses Comcast for accessing the internet.

Verizon Comcast
| |
router router
| |
192.168.1.xxx <---------> 192.168.15.xxx


So I am thinking I need a router between 192.168.1.xxx and 192.168.15.xxx to router traffic just between the two?


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#8
April 25, 2012 at 18:21:16
✔ Best Answer
I think I discovered the solution ...

Set one router to 192.168.1.1, and set the other to 192.168.1.2

Set the devices using static IPs to use one router (Verizon), or the other router (Comcast)

Link the Switches to each other

Now - everyone is on 192.168.1.x so they can share resources, but use different ISPs for connecting to the internet.

Turn off DHCP in one router and only use DHCP on the other one, simply keeping in mind which traffic needs to go where.


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#9
April 25, 2012 at 19:58:44
You may want to go to ipchicken.com and verify the different IP address. Let me know, I am very curious to see this working.

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#10
April 28, 2012 at 13:51:00
It all works likes a charm. I have about 6 devices using the Verizon side (using 192.168.1.1 as the router), plus all the Verizon internet related TV stuff (for the guide for example), and about 6+ devices using the Comcast side (using 192.168.1.2 as the router). Everyone can see each other and see all the network devices / printers / etc.

I have disabled DHCP on the Verizon router and using static IPs for the devices I want to go over Verizon, and I have DHCP enabled on the Comcast router, as well a as some static IPs to control what goes out the Comcast side.

So now - I can move devices to different ISPs as I monitor why the Verizon side keeps locking up after 2 - 3 days - even after a change of Verizon ActionTec router.

Thankfully I am using existing and borrowed equipment for this experiment, and I got Comcast Blast! internet service for $29.99 for 18 months ... as a result I am paying an extra $30 / month for this experiment and secondary / backup internet connection.


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