Solved Connecting two different IP networks...

June 2, 2012 at 11:08:12
Specs: Windows XP
I have a network in this fashion 199.199.xxx.xxx with a subnet of 255.255.255.0 in one side of a building connected to a wireless router.

I have this other network on this fashion 192.168.xxx.xxx with a subnet of 255.255.255.0 in another side of the building.

I'm thinking to use a wireless range extender to connect via wired the 192.168.xxx.xxx network and being able to access this network from network 199.199.xxx.xxx through the wireless signal.

Is this possible and if so, can you guys help me with the process of setting this up.


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✔ Best Answer
June 3, 2012 at 13:24:58
You would need to use a commercial grade router on one of the networks, a good option would be a sonicwall TZ100. You would set up one of its interfaces with a IP in the other network. On that interface, you would need to use a wired/wireless bridge to and configure it to connect to the wireless network of the other. I highly recommend against this setup, wireless is not reliable. If your company needs it to work reliably, they need to invest in running the wiring.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
Baltimore IT Support



#1
June 2, 2012 at 12:25:27
You want to route a pubic and private ip?

Hang up and live.


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#2
June 2, 2012 at 12:33:28
I know it is a public IP the 199.199.xxx.xxx but I didn't set this network up and it can not be changed.

This network is an isolated network inside this building that is only used to link production equipment. The problem is that in another part of the building where the other machines are located, the network used on these machines is the 192.168.xxx.xxx

I want to joint these two networks.


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#3
June 3, 2012 at 06:41:58
You'll need a router between them so you can apply static routes between subnets.

Just remember the 199.xxx.xxx.xxx is routable so keep it isolated from the internet. As long as you have a firewall between your LAN and the internet you shouldn't have any problems connecting the two.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#4
June 3, 2012 at 11:40:12
I have a router on the 199.199.xxx.xxx network. Can you help me with how to set the "Static Routes between Subnets" that you are referring too. I was thinking in another option, to use a D-Link wireless router I have sitting on my desk and set it as a wireless bridge.

Which one would you recommend is the best alternative?


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#5
June 3, 2012 at 13:24:58
✔ Best Answer
You would need to use a commercial grade router on one of the networks, a good option would be a sonicwall TZ100. You would set up one of its interfaces with a IP in the other network. On that interface, you would need to use a wired/wireless bridge to and configure it to connect to the wireless network of the other. I highly recommend against this setup, wireless is not reliable. If your company needs it to work reliably, they need to invest in running the wiring.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
Baltimore IT Support


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#6
June 3, 2012 at 17:20:40
Nothing will be running over this network. The only reason for having it is to provide a wireless access point to the machines PLC's for troubleshooting purposes.

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#7
June 4, 2012 at 07:36:01
You don't need a commercial grade router. SOHO equipment is good enough.

Perhaps I wasn't clear enough in my previous response so I'll try again.

You will need a router between the two subnets that is connected to the two subnets. On that router you would put one, or more, static routes depending on whether or not you needed the traffic flowing in only one direction, or going in both.

Before you configure anything you will want to click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN

For your scenario, you will want to use "Version 2" where you interconnect your two routers connect "LAN port to WAN port"

Can this be done wirelessly using a router in bridge mode you ask? I don't know for sure having never tried that myself. I avoid wireless whenever possible, especially for interconnecting network appliances. It's too unreliable compared to wired.

Having said that, I can only say, I have my doubts that it's possible with SOHO level equipment. When using a wired connection, you can diffentiate between WAN port and LAN. This isn't possible on any of the SOHO equipment I've worked on when you're talking a wireless connection. If it were me, I'd be reading through the router's manual and going through it's management interface to see if it's possible, but again, I doubt it since separate subnets means having two interfaces that are on different subnets.

Adding a static route isn't a complicated process. A few seconds to search will yield plenty of info on how to add a static route. A few minutes of reading will explain the process and logic behind it. Then you just need to find the place in your router's management interface where you can add a route and then do so and test.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
June 4, 2012 at 11:11:58
If the only purpose is to allow the wireless devices to connect to the wired devices, and not vise versa, then you could get away with using a SOHO Wireless Router like the cheapo Netgear ones, and hook the "internet" port to your wired LAN. It would allow an unsolicited connection from the wireless devices to the wired devices, but it would not allow an unsolicited connection from the wired to the wireless. The way you're describing it so far, this should work for you.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
Baltimore IT Support


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#9
June 4, 2012 at 12:09:08
hollowman512

I think you misunderstood the OP's requirements. He has two separate discrete networks inside one building, 199,199.xxx.xxx/24 and 192.168.0.0/24 He wishes to join the two subnets in order to allow communication between them.

All this requires is a static route for one-way communication or two static routes for bidirectional communication between the two separate subnets.

This doesn't require commercial or enterprise grade equipment and could in fact be done very easily with a linux or UNIX box. It could probably be done on a Windows based box too (depending on OS version) as long as the computer has two NIC's. A SOHO router is perfect for this as it has separate WAN (internet) and LAN ports.

You should read the guide wrote that I told the OP to read. It gives a simple brreakdown on the two methods of adding a second router to an exiting network that already has one SOHO router in place.

I suspect the reason the OP is asking about doing connecting the two routers to each other wirelessly is to avoid using a cable between them. Possibly there is no existing cable run between his existing SOHO router and where he wishes to physically place the second one.

Regardless, SOHO level equipment is not likely to be able to join two separate (discrete) networks together as doing so requires two separate interfaces, one for each subnet. All the SOHO routers I've worked on have only a single LAN side connection for the wireless part of them.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#10
June 4, 2012 at 13:40:39
Let me explain a little better, how the set up on this building is working.

I have a network 199.199.xxx.xxx that is connected to several production machines. On this network there is a "Wireless Router" that allows me to use the WIFI on my laptop to view and troubleshoot the programable logic controllers for this machines from the convenient of my office.

Now, in another area of the building there is a set of machines that are on the network 192.168.xxx.xxx that I will like to access them with my laptop through the Gateway router I have setup.

This is why I was thinking that if I could create a wireless bridge to another wifi device connected to network 192.168.xxx.xxx that it will allow me to view and troubleshoot the equipment.


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#11
June 4, 2012 at 13:57:23
It is not advisable to be connecting the private lan with the public lan without placing a firewall between. After all you have created a connection between the two networks. Might want to review why they were seperate in the first place.

any reason why you can't wireless connect to each subnet via wifi one connection at a time?

This way you maintain the security as well as allow yourself access to each network.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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#12
June 4, 2012 at 14:16:56
This is why I was thinking that if I could create a wireless bridge to another wifi device connected to network 192.168.xxx.xxx that it will allow me to view and troubleshoot the equipment.

Yeah, as I said, this isn't likely to be possible since you have two discrete subnets.

Do you understand the problem? If the bridge on the 192 network is set to the following example TCP/IP settings:

Address: 192.168.0.2
SM: 255.255.255.0

(keeping in mind, to communicate with the other clients in that subnet, it HAS to be assigned an IP address within the same subnet as them)

and the other end of the wireless bridge has the following TCP/IP settings:

Address: 199.199.0.2
SM: 255.255.255.0

(the same restriction applies as to the IP settings as at the other end)

This leaves the two routers on two separate subnets and they cannot communicate with each other.....period, end of story.

Now, if you can find a wireless bridge that allows for two separate wireless interfaces and can then program one for each subnet AND, has a routing table so you can add a route from one to the other, then you could do what you want.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#13
June 5, 2012 at 05:14:49
What are the makes and models of the two routers you already have?

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
IT Support Maryland


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#14
June 5, 2012 at 05:44:05
Netgear DGN2200

D-Link DIR-655


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#15
June 6, 2012 at 07:19:21
The D-Link router will not work at all in this scenario. It is only designed to be connected to one LAN and the internet and makes no mention of static routes in its documentation. To make this work, you'd need to replace it with a router that can connect to two LAN's and the internet, in addition to a wireless bridge. The SonicWall TZ100 I mentioned earlier could do that, and so could a windows or linux box that are configured properly. I'd opt for the SW since you'd spend less time setting it up.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
IT Support Maryland


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#16
June 9, 2012 at 15:53:51
I decided to run the wired connection to the gateway I already have running on the 199.199.xxx.xxx network, then I will do the routing to get them to communicate.

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#17
June 11, 2012 at 07:32:59
hollowman512

The D-Link router will not work at all in this scenario. It is only designed to be connected to one LAN and the internet and makes no mention of static routes in its documentation.

You'll excuse me for chuckling but it is a SOHO router. What good would a "router" be if it can't "route"???

The simple fact that it has both a WAN (external) port and LAN (internal) ports implies it has to be able to route or else how would the traffic pass from one interface to another.

I suspect you haven't worked with too many SOHO routers but they're all designed along the same lines. But because they have the two interfaces, they can be used as described in my guide to create two separate subnets within a single LAN. In fact, if you wanted to, you could have multiple subnets within a single network using SOHO routers. You would need a separate router for each subnet.


JMR0311

Good for you. I recommended that method because you have no other choice with the equipment you're using. Just think of how much time you could have saved both of us if you had listened to me right from the begining.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#18
June 11, 2012 at 15:23:09
I certainly thank you Curt R for the the time you took to help me with this issue. After looking into my options deeper I discover that near where the 192.168.xxx.xxx network is located there is a cabinet that already has an industrial unmanage switch that belongs to network 199.199.xxx.xxx and I was able to run a short-run of ethernet cable to bring the 192.168.xxx.xxx network into it.

Now what I will need help is with the set up of what ever I need to be able to talk to this network.


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