Connecting server to router

July 29, 2009 at 01:04:08
Specs: Windows XP
I have a server running on port 80 and I would like to have it accessible by a wireless router. I have a ethernet crossover cable connecting the server NIC to the WAN port of the router. How do I configure the NIC properties (IP address, Default Gateway, DNS) for the server? What should the IP, Default Gateway, and DCHP settings be for the router? And, how should the router be set up so that if someone connects to it they are automatically directed to the server/port 80 for a splash screen?

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#1
July 29, 2009 at 01:22:31
First of all, why did you connect the server to the WAN port?
This could be a problem, because if the server is in the same ip range as the PCs and the routers LAN side, it will never asked the WAN port for accessing the server.
If the server is not in the same range and you have another router, to access the internet, that is configured as the standard gateway for the clients to access the internet, it will also never ask the WAN port of your wireless router, to access your web server.

So why are you using the WAN port to connect your web server?

Please send a reply, if you solved the problem !!!


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#2
July 29, 2009 at 20:54:44
Because I want to see how it can be done and how the WAN port differs from the LAN ports. I'm still wondering about the configuration as far as IP addresses go and how visitors can be directed to the server's index page. Note: This router will not be hooked up to the internet and I would like to know how to utilize the WAN port for this project.

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#3
July 30, 2009 at 07:13:15
But users from outside your network do come from the WAN port to your internal network (LAN port), where the server is connected to.

So the server has to be connected to a LAN port, firewall settings has to be modified, to allow access for port 80 to your server.
At the WAN interfase of the router, your have to use a static ip for testing, if your don't wonna test it over the real internet.
A client PC then must be connected to the WAN interface (maybe by using a crossover cable). The client PCs ip address must be in the same range as the IP of the WAN port, to get access to work.

That's it.

Please send a reply, if you solved the problem !!!


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#4
July 30, 2009 at 07:32:20
There really isn't any point to using the WAN port for this. It just adds complexity to your setup. Plug the server into a LAN port and be done with it. This requires no configuration to allow your other LAN clients to connect to the server.

The basic principle in all computing is: KISS which stands for "Keep It Simple Stupid"

And no, I'm not calling you stupid, that's just what the acronym stands for. What it really means with regard to your setup is, trying to utilize the WAN port for something that should be using a LAN port means having to properly configure the WAN port so as to allow traffic between LAN and WAN. If you knew how to do it, you wouldn't be here asking how and since you are, this means it's:
a) more effort than it's worth (since there is a simple, proper, way to do it

and

b) beyond your knowledge level and abilities and therefore again, more effort than it's worth since you either have to get explicit instructions from someone who can figure it out, or else, you have to figure it out for yourself.

I'm a networking professional. I have over 15 years of experience in computing (the last 4+ specifically in enterprise level networking) and I wouldn't bother with the mess you're attempting, I'd just plug my server into a LAN port and be done with it.


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#5
July 31, 2009 at 09:47:40
I figured it out and it was not difficult at all. Curt R. wouldn't it have been easier for you to write a paragraph about how it can be done than 4 with no help at all? Remember KISS!

Thank you paulsep for your assistance.


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#6
July 31, 2009 at 10:36:25
no problem.

Please send a reply, if you solved the problem !!!


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