Connect wireless router to win server network

August 15, 2011 at 09:57:01
Specs: Windows XP, 2.4GHZ/1G
Hi. I have a wireless router connected to our win 2003 network. Rough diagram is internet-> Linksys router -> wireless router & server -> switches

The wireless router's IP is setup as part of our network (given static IP, subnet, gateway, and DNS) It's working now, but the problem is I have to manually setup TCP/IP to conform to our network setup (like IP, subnet, gateway, DNS etc..) for each laptop. So users have to set the settings back to automatic IP setting mode when they leave our office. It's pretty inconveniet.

I just want to make people to type in our password and easily connect. How can I do this? Thanks in advance.


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#1
August 15, 2011 at 10:28:09
Do you not have DHCP enabled on the Linksys router? If yes and clients connected to the wireless router aren't getting proper TCP/IP settings from the DHCP server then something isn't correct.

I have written a guide for connecting a second router. May I suggest you read it. To read it, click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
August 15, 2011 at 10:54:00
Hello, Curt. Thanks alot for your help. I read your instructions. Some people advised to enable DHCP in the wireless router for a small range (outside the current DHCP range.) Which would be a better solution? This is mainly for guests who want to use internet in our building. Thank you.

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#3
August 16, 2011 at 08:25:52
Some people advised to enable DHCP in the wireless router for a small range (outside the current DHCP range.) Which would be a better solution?

Either will work. But it's simpler to use just one DHCP server. When the downstream router is correctly configured, it becomes transparent and all DHCP requests from wireless clients connecting to it pass through it to the DHCP server in the upstream router.

If you choose to have two DHCP servers running (not recommended) then yes, make sure the DHCP scopes do not overlap. You would want something like:

(example only)
Router 1
DHCP Scope = 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.150

Router 2
DHCP Scope = 192.168.0.151 to 192.168.0.199

However, I'm a firm believe in the KISS principle when it comes to computing and having two separate DHCP servers running in one segment of a network is overcomplicating things. It also means extra configuration and just one more thing that can be configured wrong, or break.

I'm a networking professional and I'm telling you if I were doing this at home, I'd set it up with just one DHCP server and leave it at that. I suspect whomever told you to split the DHCP is not a professional like me because no professional I know would do it that way unless they had no other choice.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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