Connect To LAN via Router

September 4, 2009 at 11:14:05
Specs: Windows 7
I would like to connect to my Campus network (wireless) via my home router. It's within range. How can i do that ? Does my router need any special features, VPN etc. ?(LAN to LAN connection) Thank you.

Btw, campus LAN is using WPA-Enterprise security with TKIP encryption.

I want to connect to campus internet because its speed is VERY fast. How do I create the connection to campus LAN from my router so i can surf internet ?


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#1
September 4, 2009 at 12:42:44
You cant connect to another wirless netwrok with a wirless router unless the router has bridge mode, not all do. You would then need to connect your computre to the router via wire.

Normally you would connect to a wireless network with a wirless interface card on the computer.

Stuart


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#2
September 4, 2009 at 13:09:10
Campus's have high security, therefore ask the IT Dept if you are allowed to even attempt this, circumnavigating Internet Access Policy can lead to being disiplined!

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#3
September 5, 2009 at 01:41:44
So, my router must be able to bridge connections. Security policy is not a problem actually.

I connect to my router via cable and my router acts as a network interface card (NIC) and connects to my Campus wireless network. And then I bridge the ethernet and wireless LAN's. I get it until here.

One question, do you know any routers that can act as NIC's ? I mean to use them to connect to a wireless network ? (This should be equivalent to using your PC to connect to a WLAN). ?


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Related Solutions

#4
September 5, 2009 at 05:40:01
Router don’t act as NICs, they act as routers in bridge mode.

You have to understand how wireless network work. For any given channel Wi-Fi transmit and receive on different frequencies. They have to in order to get full duplex. Router and Wireless Access Points transmit on the same frequency that NIC receive on and vive vera.

In order to get your router to connect to the campus network the frequencies are reversed to it is transmitting and receiving on the same frequencies as a NIC would. This means that a NIC cannot connect to it as they are then transmitting and receiving on the same frequencies.

You can connect by wire and they would be on the network as the wireless router providing to disable DHCP in your router. There is really little to be achieved by doing what you are planning. If your router can connect to the wireless network why not just connect the computer? The only advantage is of you have a computer that has no wireless capabilities.

If you want to connect to your router via wireless you would need a wireless repeater, sometimes called range extenders. This is a different piece of equipment than a wireless router. They take the wireless signal from a router and retransmit it on a different channel.

Have a read of this:

http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.ph...

Stuart


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#5
September 5, 2009 at 08:10:18
Meaning if we flash the existing wireless router that can do "bridging" with the DD-WRT, we can connect to another LAN.

This is done by changing settings in the DD-WRT to make the existing wireless router to act as a repeater. Is this correct ?


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#6
September 5, 2009 at 08:23:48
Let me clarify the situation. Maybe my intended solution was not the best one (To connect to campus LAN via wireless router).

I'm living about 100 meters from campus. I want to connect to campus wireless internet. Im using an AMD Presario CQ-40 133AX laptop.

From my desk, I cannot connect to campus WLAN. However, if I stand by the window or balcony, I can get connected to campus LAN at one signal bar, which does not affect the surfing speed (High speed as usual). However, it does affect signal stability as it disconnects often.

My problem is I cant be standing at the window or balcony all the time. I need a way to connect to campus WLAN at my desk. What is the best way to do that ?

Will a USB wireless adapter hanging out of my window help ? As my laptop can connect with its built in wireless capabilities, I think USB wireless adapter should transmit more power and solve the signal stability problem ? Is this true ?

Does anyone have a better solution for my situation ?


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#7
September 5, 2009 at 08:51:34
100 meters you are pushing it, you are lucky to get anything at that distance unless you have complete line of sight. A wireless router really isn't going to do much to help at all.

A USB wireless adaptor on a flying lead is probably your best solution. Transmitting power has little to do with it as the amount of power tranmited by any wi-fi device is highly regulated. A USB device transmits no more power thanany other wi-fi device, however it can be better positioned which can make all the difference.

Stuart


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#8
September 6, 2009 at 05:45:35
If I'm not mistaken, you'd need both wireless devices at each end of the connection set to bridge mode.

If I'm correct, you could ask, but I wager the university wouldn't do this for you.

Does anyone have a better solution for my situation ?

At the risk of sounding rude my suggestion is get a part time job and then pay for highspeed internet in your own apartment.

This is a much better solution than connecting to the universities network because if you did do that, you would then have to live by their "appropriate use" policy which could (and likely would) restrict your usage.


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