Cisco srp527w (SRP500 Series) quick question

July 8, 2012 at 19:43:11
Specs: Win7, 8 Gig
Hi Guys

Does anyone have a Cisco srp527 or is able to tell me if they are capable of setting up either

1. IP Directed-Broadcast
or
2. Static ARP ? (not static DHCP)

Thanks heaps for any input.


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#1
July 9, 2012 at 07:09:20
If it doesn't say it will do it in the manual, then it probably doesn't. Alternatively you could google the device and read the specifications on it.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
July 9, 2012 at 19:37:13
If I have the intelligence to know what an IP Directed-broadcast or static arp is then there is a high chance that I already had the intelligence to Google it before posting this already :) thanks for your reply but not really helpful I'm afraid I was hoping to hear from someone who had that particular router who could say "Yes I just checked and it is an option or "no it is no an option", manuals do not outline every option in a router especially Cisco and where a command line may be involved !

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#3
July 10, 2012 at 07:18:29
If I have the intelligence to know what an IP Directed-broadcast or static arp is then there is a high chance that I already had the intelligence to Google it before posting this already :)

Adding the smiley face afterwards doesn't change a snarky comment into a nice one. If you had the intelligence you claim, you wouldn't be here asking for help. I've worked with Cisco products for years and never had to ask such a basic question in a forum like this. But then, I have the intelligence to do more than one simple search and give up.

manuals do not outline every option in a router especially Cisco and where a command line may be involved !

If you have a problem with how Cisco developes their manuals, bitch at them, not me. It's not my fault after all.

Personally, I'm not a fan of Cisco products and this is one of the reasons why. At one point in time, Cisco was the only game in town and they gouged clients horribly. They still do. On top of gouging for support, they keep their IOS as "mystical" as possible to force people to pay for overprices training and certifications.

If people would stop buying their products, eventually they'll lose a big share of the market and that will force them to create clear, concise, and accurate documentation and change some of their other business practices. But as long as fools keep buying their crap because "It's the best!" (it's not really, and hasn't been for some time but they'd like you all to keep thinking so) they don't feel the need to change their practices.

Luckily, where I work now, we've gotten rid of all the Cisco products and moved on to a competitors products which is every bit as powerful, flexible, and a whole lot easier to work with. Unlike Cisco, their documentation encompasses all the features of their equipment.

Having said all that, back to my original point. Google is your friend

There are multiple Cisco forums out there that you could peruse and if you don't find an answer off the top, you could join and ask this question there. I've done that numerous times in the past, successfully I might add, and all it will take is some of your time and a bit of skull sweat.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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