Solved Chaining 2 routers - 2 seperate Networks.

August 2, 2011 at 02:51:54
Specs: Windows 7
Hi all,

I know that question was raised several times but in the end, the solution was often to turn the whole thing into a switch.

Here my issue is that i'm using a cable modem that opens on a 192.168.0.1/24 net.
there i hav a second router that is actually a VPN gateway (wan is 0.100) and leads to a 192.168.1.1/24 network.
Not htat second router has also a gateway 10.0.0.0/24 for VPN purpose. then some routes will actually force anything behind the second router to go thru the VPN (hence the 2 network/routers)

Anyway, let's put the VPN aside for the time being. :)

Somehow i was expecting that having the Second router connected to the first one (lan 2 wan) and activating DynNAT, i should be able to access Internet 192.168.1.x natted into 192.168.0.x then internet.

Yeah well it doesn't work. i can't ping any external devices. I can however ping any adsress on both 0.x and 1.x from second router's lan.

Am i missing something here ?

Again, before turning the Router into a VPN gateway, i'd like to at least get the 2nd LAN to acces Internet.

First modem : Netgear cable Router;
Second Modelm : DD-WRT software


Thanks
cheers.
Fred.


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#1
August 2, 2011 at 07:37:30
✔ Best Answer
Somehow i was expecting that having the Second router connected to the first one (lan 2 wan) and activating DynNAT, i should be able to access Internet 192.168.1.x natted into 192.168.0.x then internet.

I don't know what DynNAT is. I suspect it's some external online service which won't work when you're talking about joining two LAN subnets. You can't use an external resource like that to join to internal subnets. It just won't work.

What you need is to have the two routers connected and to have a route between them. However, from the sounds of it, the WAN ports on both are being used for external connection which pretty much makes what you want to do impossible. If you were using something a little more robust than SOHO Routers you could do it.

For more in-depth info on how to setup/configure a dual router setup, click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN

I'm not sure if my guide will help you accomplish your goal, it probably won't since the scenario where you have two separate subnets requires the downstream router to connect to the upstream via it's WAN port.

Just FYI, if you had a 3'd router, you could put it between the two other's and make it work.
For example, we'll make one of your routers "router1" (the one with the internet connection. The other one (the VPN router) you wish to join to it will be "router3" and the new one (the go-between) will be "router2"
Here's the setup:

router1 (LAN Port) >> (WAN Port) router2 (LAN Port) >> (LAN Port) router3

This should work.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
August 2, 2011 at 09:27:50
hi Curt, thanks for the reply.
what I tend to call dynNat is juste the dynamic nat instead of 1to1 static nat. (to avoid confusion with port forwarding) nothing fancy here, sorry for the confusion.

Regarding the 2nd router, his sole purpose is to redirect alll trafic into the VPN. and therefore the computers behind the 2nd router whould access the Internet thru a gateway that is on the other end of the VPN.

regarding the route u mention, it is indeed what's probably missing.
I'll check it out and will update later on
cheers.



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